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Thread: The Seedy World Of Hackers Who Trade Celebrity Nudes

  1. #1

    Default The Seedy World Of Hackers Who Trade Celebrity Nudes

    "Several deep dives by security researchers into the secretive online world of stolen nudes paints a very different picture. An underground trade in these high-profile images has been going on for years, and continues today. This leak was likely an aberration, a clueless move from a greedy rookie that exposed a long-hidden ring built around stealing and trading private photos of high-profile women. Disturbingly, according to those with knowledge of the trading rings, these leaked photos represent just the tip of the iceberg, an accidental glimpse into a world that would have preferred to stay buried."

    A GLIMPSE INTO A WORLD THAT PREFERS TO STAY HIDDEN

  2. #2

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    I think people have to come to the realization that anything stored online is at risk of being exposed. They need to be ambivalent to the prospect of its release to the public.

    It's worse than having your financial information compromised. That can be repaired, and if you're vigilant, usually at no cost. But once photos are out there, you can't get them back.
    Last edited by ZippyTheChimp; September 10th, 2014 at 10:52 AM.

  3. #3

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    Regrettably, I agree.

    The issue with I-Cloud (or for that matter google clound services for android) is once it is set-up, it automatically backs up data and photos from your phone. You don't really have to store data it on-line, IOS or i-tumes automatically does if for you. Because the back up function is a passive process, it is easy to forget or not realize your photos are being stored.

    In addition, when deleting photos from your phone i-cloud is synced and updated. Unfortunately, what most people don't realize (including me until recently) is even after deletion, a digital foot print remains that apprantely can reproduce the deleted photo.

    As troubling as this is, I am more confounded by some of the media coverage which has bascially take the "blame the victim" approach. News pundits from mos of the cable outlets are somehow suggesting these young women are to blame for having the audacity to take nude photos of themselves for their private purposes, as if to suggest they are moral degenerates who got what they deserved. Many of the Fox anchors are taking this position, but they are not alone. On Morning Joe, Minka Brzezinski appeared to be positively mortified that someone would have the audacaity to take an actual nude photo of themselves for thier own personal purposes.


    Jon Stewart:

    "I get it. These women were asking for it," Stewart said. "It's like they said to the Boston Strangler's victims: 'If you don't want to get strangled, you shouldn't have had a neck.'"

    Last edited by eddhead; September 10th, 2014 at 10:39 AM.

  4. #4

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    Why do celebs put nude pics of themselves on iCloud in the first place?

  5. #5

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    the issue with i-cloud (or for that matter google clound services for android) is once it is set-up, it automatically backs up data and photos from your phone. you don't really have to store data it on-line, ios or i-tumes automatically does if for you. because the back up function is a passive process, it is easy to forget or not realize your photos are being stored.



  6. #6

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    iCloud Photo Stream can be turned off easy enough. The purpose of passively backing up photos are the numbers of people who've walked into Apple Store's and complained that they've lost all of their photos.

    Most people don't bother with backing up their photos to their computers or to a hard drive, so those precious memories are mostly archived on the phone - which are eventually lost, dropped into water, or smashed and unrecoverable.

  7. #7

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    The vulnerabilities aren't inherent to the cloud services themselves, which for the most part are very secure. The problem is in passwords that are too easily compromisable. Though it can be argued that this is a security flaw in the system.

    Using a password that is too closely associated with something in your life opens the possibility for someone who is motivated enough to research the intimate parts of your life and put together password options.

    Such as using your dogs name, your favorite color, or your birthdate. These are weak password combinations that open vectors of attack.

    iCloud and many other services offer the ability to generate random passwords that would be very difficult to guess and store them in the browser for you. Most people don't use them.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teno View Post
    The vulnerabilities aren't inherent to the cloud services themselves, which for the most part are very secure.
    How about theft by an employee?

    Using a password that is too closely associated with something in your life opens the possibility for someone who is motivated enough to research the intimate parts of your life
    A prime motivation seems to be money.

    It's not necessarily about sexy photos. Like you can't find that anywhere on the internet. People are willing to pay for something that belongs to someone else, something they shouldn't have.

    These are weak password combinations that open vectors of attack.
    True enough, but anything can be hacked. It just changes the odds that it will happen to you.

    How many people know about this?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    How about theft by an employee?
    The bigger cloud services Apple, Google, Dropbox all encrypt the contents of user accounts so employees of the companies do not have direct access to the contents.


    A prime motivation seems to be money.
    Very true, when I first heard an iCloud hack was used to steal the pictures, I didn't believe it because such a hack would be a huge deal and not only used for something so trivial. It would be used to access information for leverage around money.


    True enough, but anything can be hacked. It just changes the odds that it will happen to you.
    Yep nothing is 100%. Most of the time they are just trying to stay a step or two ahead of the hackers.Though I will add the majority of hacking techniques are extremely difficult to successfully pull off, and most of the time these guys put in many hours of trying before they succeed.

    One major reason Apple is pushing TouchID on its mobile devices. But of course its only a matter of time before someone discovers a way around it.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teno View Post
    iCloud Photo Stream can be turned off easy enough.
    The problem isn't that it can be turned off but rather most people don't think to turn it off, or don't realize it is on.

    The purpose of passively backing up photos are the numbers of people who've walked into Apple Store's and complained that they've lost all of their photos.
    I agree it is a valuable feature - one I used myself when I had an i-phone and use today with Google drive. The purpose of my post wasn't to attack Apple, it was to focus that at least for these women either there unforseen consequences to backing up their photos, or unknown back up features. It was in response to possible suggestions that people were knowingly posting nude pics of themselves on i-cloud

    I can also understand how i-phone owners might be under the impression that function deleting photos using the i-Cloud dashboard means the photos are deleted forever. Clearly they are not.

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