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Thread: 34th Street Transitway

  1. #76
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    Hmm, I was under the impression that Macy's had since purchased the corner building

  2. #77
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New 34th St. Traffic Plan Gives Cars Just 2 Lanes

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...ding_lanes.php

    Cars and trucks on 34th Street in Manhattan would be squeezed into two lanes — one moving east, the other west — with a bus-only lane on either side, under a revised plan for the thoroughfare to be unveiled by the Bloomberg administration on Monday.

    The plan would eliminate an earlier proposal for concrete barriers that would have separated bus lanes on the street from other vehicular traffic, according to four people briefed on the city’s plans who did not want to be identified over concerns that city officials might be angry at them for releasing the information early.

    The reconstituted streetscape is a stripped-down version of an earlier design, first proposed by the city in 2008, that drew ire from some residents and tabloid columnists.

    Other controversial elements of that plan have now also been scrapped, including a pedestrian plaza that would have banned cars and trucks between Herald Square and the Empire State Building.

    The new proposal calls for buses to travel in exclusive terra cotta-hued lanes, similar to a street design recently installed along First and Second Avenues that has speeded up trips along Manhattan’s East Side.

    But a parking and loading lane would be installed in some places between the bus lanes and the curbside, a concession to residents and business owners concerned that the plan would block automobile access to the front of their buildings. A spokesman for the city’s Department of Transportation declined to comment on Friday.

    The design will be formally presented on Monday at a public hearing hosted by Janette Sadik-Khan, the transportation commissioner, and Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president.

    The proposal comes after a difficult few weeks for Ms. Sadik-Khan, who has been sued over a bicycle lane in Brooklyn and has been the subject of much criticism over the initial 34th Street plan, which naysayers denounced as a detriment to the street’s aesthetic.

    The city has long sought a way to speed up mass transit and to provide more room for pedestrians on 34th Street, a notoriously car-clogged corridor.

    On Friday, politicians and business leaders said the new plan represented a step forward in the Transportation Department’s willingness to integrate community concerns into its designs.

    “In the midst of all this hubbub, there has been careful analysis going on behind the scenes,” said Dan Biederman, president of the 34th Street Partnership. “They have come to a scheme that they believe in, rather than one that’s only the product of political compromise.”

    Mr. Biederman added that he was pleased that cars would be restricted to a single lane in each direction. “It is not a good thing for Midtown retail to have a screaming four-lane roadway,” Mr. Biederman said. “It’s very un-New York.”

    Daniel R. Garodnick, a City Council member who said his office had fielded concerns about the plan from 34th Street residents, said the new proposal “is much closer to what the community was looking for.”

    “Curb access is already the source of much frustration, and this plan may actually bring some relief,” Mr. Garodnick said.

    The decision to eliminate the concrete barrier between bus lanes and other traffic is bound to disappoint some transportation advocates, who say a physically quarantined bus lane, which cannot be impeded by swerving cars or illegally parked vehicles, provides for the fastest possible trip. But Gene Russianoff, a lawyer for the Straphangers Campaign, said he was taking a pragmatic view.

    “This is New York,” Mr. Russianoff said. “Every inch of public space has a constituency and a set of demands. It’s just realistic to pay attention to what those are and the parameters of what’s possible.”

    The bus lanes would be on opposite sides of 34th Street, rather than adjacent to one another, which the original plan called for. The new design is also expected to create more space for parking, loading and deliveries than is found in the street’s current configuration.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/12/ny...ffic.html?_r=2

  3. #78
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    City Rolls Out New 34th Street Redesign With Larger Sidewalks, Fewer Lanes

    The new plan is intended to ease congestion along

    By Jill Colvin




    MIDTOWN — Drivers on 34th Street will be given only two lanes of traffic under a makeover plan that includes new express bus lanes and 18,000 square feet of new pedestrian space.

    The plan, which was unveiled by the Department of Transportation to a group of community leaders Monday evening, is intended to ease congestion and speed bus travel along the notoriously busy stretch.

    The plan calls for the street to be divided into five lanes between Third and Ninth avenues, with a dedicated bus lane running in each direction from the FDR Drive to Twelfth Avenue. Cars and other vehicles would travel east and west in single interior lanes.

    The last lane, which would shift from the north to south side of the street, would alternate between loading and unloading zones, right-turn space and sidewalk extensions, dubbed "bus bulbs" where bus stops and seating would be placed.

    East of Third Avenue and west of Ninth avenue, the wider roadway would include loading zones and new pedestrian spaces on both sides of the street.

    "As we know, 34th street is a street that is just not working today,” said Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, who had originally envisioned a much more ambitious plan that would have included a pedestrian plaza between Fifth and Sixth avenues.

    The department announced the plaza idea had been scrapped earlier this month after months of criticism from local residents and business owners who worried barriers would cut them off from the street.

    The current plan calls for 300 loading and unloading commercial parking spots — seven times more than the number today, officials said.

    And while concerns remain about the location of the loading zones and whether two lanes will be enough to handle traffic on the street, overall, the plan received a much more positive reception than previous incarnations. Residents praised the department for addressing many of their concerns.

    "It’s certainly an improvement over the initial design," said City Councilman Daniel Garodnick, who said that the new plan should help to improve the curb-side access problem.

    "34th Street is screaming for an overhaul and it is clear that DOT took heed of the community’s concerns," he said, adding that "the gridlock on 34th Street is definitely not going to get any better on its own."

    Mark Thompson, the chair of Community Board 6, also called the plan "impressive."

    "It's much better than the last one. Really improved," he said.
    But not everyone was happy, including George Haikalis, co-chair of vision 42, a group that wants to see 34 Street transformed into green space from the Hudson to the East River.

    "It's better than what we had, but it's definitely not a miracle on 34th Street," he said of the plan. "We're going to put a little pavement, nudge it a little. It's not a vision, it's an accommodation."

    West Village resident Maria Hansen, who is blind, also called on the city to beware that new, unusual street configurations present serious challenges to the visually impaired.

    Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, who also praised the current plan, stressed that the version presented Monday was only a "first draft."

    "The process doesn’t end tonight. It's really just the beginning," he said.

    The DOT will now begin a traffic study and environmental review. It expects to have a final version ready to present by late 2011 or early 2012. Curb-side bus payment and bus lane camera enforcement are set to begin later this year, with construction planned for 2012.

    The public will have a chance to weigh in at two meetings later this month. The first will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on March 30 at the Norman Thomas High School at 111 E. 33rd St., and the second will be held on March 31 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the New Yorker Hotel at 481 West Eighth Ave.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110314/manh...#ixzz1Gfh8v9bk

  4. #79
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    No dropping off the wife to go shopping. Unless the aim is that she gets hit by a bus on her way to the curb.

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    Would help the trade deficit.

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    No dropping off the wife to go shopping. Unless the aim is that she gets hit by a bus on her way to the curb.
    Well, according to this design you can cross the bus lane and pull over on the south side while driving East. But yes, if you're driving West, then you are seriously risking your well being by opening that door

  7. #82
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I think the curb access is for deliveries and such. Maybe cabs, too -- but that shouldn't be allowed, either. What's the point of creating a dedicated bus lane if cars are going back and forth across it willy nilly?

  8. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    No dropping off the wife to go shopping. Unless the aim is that she gets hit by a bus on her way to the curb.
    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    Well, according to this design you can cross the bus lane and pull over on the south side while driving East. But yes, if you're driving West, then you are seriously risking your well being by opening that door
    Crosstown traffic speed will improve --over an occasional dead body.

    Is this like the suburbs?

    In the city, isn't safety assured by a complex interaction of eye-contacts --not rules?

  9. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    In the city, isn't safety assured by a complex interaction of eye-contacts --not rules?





  10. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Park the damned cars at the perimeter of Manhattan and use public transit / taxis to get around midtown.
    Makes sense. I love driving, sadly, but recently I had to go from Midtown to Philly. It took me the exact same amount of time to get from 60th and Lexington to the Lincoln Tunnel as it took me to get from the tunnel to Philadelphia - 1.5 hours. Seriously.

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeCom View Post
    Makes sense. I love driving, sadly, but recently I had to go from Midtown to Philly. It took me the exact same amount of time to get from 60th and Lexington to the Lincoln Tunnel as it took me to get from the tunnel to Philadelphia - 1.5 hours. Seriously.
    It is pretty ridiculous, I also went to Philly 2 weeks ago and going from astoria to jersey took about an hour on a Sunday morning. It seems to me that the fastest way may be to take the harlem river drive all the way up to the GWB and come back down the turnpike, strangely enough.

    It's too bad there's no through tunnel from Queens to Jersey, that would relieve a lot of congestion

  12. #87
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    What would relieve a lot of conjestion would be a few things:

    1. CHARGE ALL ACCESS to Manhattan. Triborough, Queensborough, Brooklyn, EVERYTHING.
    2. DO NOT ALLOW TRUCKS, over a certain size, in the city after a certain hour and before a certain hour. Not just entrance, but actual PRESENCE. Too many trucks in the "city that never sleeps".
    3. Find some way to encourage people to park their cars. I don't know, Metro credit if you come across the bridge (keep your receipt or something?), PARK your car, and then take Mass Transit.
    4. The congestion charges they kept batting around and wussed out on.

  13. #88

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    That would be great, but having a visionary like Bloomberg with the gumption to do something like that is a once in a lifetime occurrence in NY. Thus, this great idea will not come to fruition.

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