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Thread: Arts and Crafts Architecture in New York

  1. #1
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Arts and Crafts Architecture in New York

    Just gorgeous .


    Walkabout: It’s Time for Arts and Crafts


    Lafayette Ave, Clinton Hill


    Lafayette Ave, Grand and Classon


    3rd St. Kinko's, Park Slope


    Prospect Pl Cottages, Crown Heights North


    Kinko's Houses, Brooklyn Ave


    Excerpt from article:

    So what about Brooklyn? We see the Arts and Crafts influence more on the interiors of our buildings, in the tall oak paneling and choice of fireplace tiles and mantles in many Renaissance Revival row houses, and in the beamed ceilings of free-standing houses in Victorian Flatbush. The architects working in our neighborhoods at this time were not ignorant of styles and trends. Working within the strictures of a 20’ urban plot does not lend itself to too much variety, but inside? The two-family Kinko houses of Crown Heights North and Park Slope, built between 1910 and 1915, were A&C cottages inside, with a more open layout, built-ins, and Craftsman style lighting fixtures, paneling and tile inside. Many of Axel Hedman’s limestones also feature A&C details, often mixing interior Neo-Colonial details, such as French doors, leading to rooms with five foot high oak wainscoting, plate rails and other classic A&C details. Victorian Flatbush is home to bungalows and Four-squares, as are parts of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst and other parts of southern Brooklyn.

    Other architects are more influenced by the English building tradition of Arts and Crafts. Row houses in Clinton Hill, and a special row in Crown Heights North illustrate this part of the tradition well, although they are few and far between. The distinctive use of brick as a building and trim material often heralds a more English style A&C house, and the Crown Heights Cottages are in a class by themselves. The decorative styles of the movement can be used in a variety of homes, and the clean, uncluttered simplicity of Mission furniture lends itself nicely to a spare, modern aesthetic, adding natural warmth to what can sometimes be a cold look. All in all, the Arts and Crafts Movement is still very much with us, a versatile and valuable style again for the 21st century. I only scratched the surface of this important movement.

    See Flickr for more photos.

    full article from Brownstoner

  2. #2

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    In many ways, a lot of non-modernist, suburban architecture is still strongly influenced (if usually badly rendered) by the 'Arts & Crafts' movement/style.

    Interestingly, this is a school of architectural thought that is difficult to categorize very precisely and overlaps significnatly with 'free style'. some later art nouveau, as well as 'impressionism'. All part of the "picturesque secession", to strict classicists, I guess.

  3. #3
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Many more spot on examples on the West Coast.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    In many ways, a lot of non-modernist, suburban architecture is still strongly influenced (if usually badly rendered) by the 'Arts & Crafts' movement/style.

    Interestingly, this is a school of architectural thought that is difficult to categorize very precisely and overlaps significnatly with 'free style'. some later art nouveau, as well as 'impressionism'. All part of the "picturesque secession", to strict classicists, I guess.
    In art history courses - from what I recall - the Arts & Crafts Architectural style was 'categorized' as being a "regionalist" style. Your post prompted me to take a look at one of my old art history texts - most of which were written by By either Canaday or Gardner.


    A snippit from some recent readings -
    The interesting thing about styled traditional architecture, as opposed to vernacular, is that, up until the late nineteenth century, the style always derives from religious architecture, and this is true not only of our home-grown European styles of Classical and Gothic but also of traditional styles throughout the globe.

    The nineteenth century exceptions to this rule are the widespread late "regionalist" styles such as Arts and Crafts in England (Fig. 5), Modernista in North Eastern Spain (Fig. 6), the Prairie School in America's mid-west (Fig. 7), and so on, but all of these to a greater or lesser degree were founded on local vernacular architecture and on the local environment, for it was in this way that they established the regionalist credentials they sought.
    Last edited by infoshare; April 21st, 2010 at 12:19 PM. Reason: add link

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