Page 10 of 29 FirstFirst ... 6789101112131420 ... LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 428

Thread: New York University Expansion

  1. #136
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post

    In any other location, they'd have to acquire the land (with or without buildings on it), probably go through zoning changes with that. And who knows if the locals there would be as opposed to these villiage idiots. And in the end, if they did build elsewhere, they'd end up with a scattered, inefficient campus.
    NYU has been offered by CB1 the opportunity to build big tall and whatever at the 130 Liberty site at the edge of the WTC. The community would make many concessions for NYU to build there rather than here. There is little to no opposition to this offer, and any claims of too big, too tall, too crowded don't fly at a site next to where four huge towers are planned / rising and where the estimate is that upwards of 5 million tourists / year will be walking around in a couple of years.

    NYU is not completely centralized. They are currently developing their medical center on the East Side and expanding to Brooklyn. They also plan to expand onto Governors island. Not to mention their numerous international campuses planned for London, Singapore, Dubai and elsewhere (they wanted to open a campus in beautiful Paris, but found that zoning restrictions there weren't to their liking).

    The tower / hotel proposed for this site is part of the NYU PR plan for an international campus. That could be done at the downtown location, just a short subway ride (on numerous lines) a bit farther downtown.

  2. #137

    Default

    ^
    It's not "other areas of the Village." It's directly adjacent, on the same superblock, in the logical place to put the fourth tower.

    And that's the whole issue. Their not spreading highrises all over the village, they're putting them where they already are.

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    I disagree, and that's why I specifically mentioned towers in addition to those that already exist. Personally, I'd like to raze the Silver Towers. Nonetheless, while this cancer already exists in the Village, it would be nice to prevent it from spreading to other areas in GV.

  3. #138

    Default

    you haven't answered my question....
    Please explain how you come to the conclusion that THIS space is "necessary to sustain the economic viability of the city in the future"... and not with an opinion please- just facts.

  4. #139

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    As we've seen before landmarking is a VERY politically fungible process.
    You're talking about the reverse process.

    So what property in the city do you know of that was de-landmarked?

  5. #140
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    ^ Here's one.

    That same article also mentions three others within the past 14 years whose landmark designation was overturned by the City Council.

  6. #141

    Default

    Jamaica Savings was never upheld by the City Council. Silver Towers was upheld by City Council, which made it law.

    The rarity that the article speaks of is the Council overturning the LPC designation. I know of no case at all where they upheld and later reversed.

  7. #142
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    I don't believe that it's allowable for the City Council to overturn a full designation. There is nothing in the City Charter that speaks to that and there are no examples to be found where such a reverse of an LPC designation has taken place.

    NYU is a not-for-profit organization (amazing, but true) and therefore could apply to alter the landmarked Silver Towers site based upon financial hardship. From LPC FAQS:

    ... if a not-for-profit organization applies for a permit to demolish or alter a tax-exempt property on grounds of hardship, the law provides a different standard for establishing the hardship. The organization must prove, among other things, that the landmark building is no longer adequate or suitable for carrying out the organization's charitable purposes ...

    Mayor Bloomberg had an opportunity to disapprove the designation of Silver Towers after the LPC, City Planning and the City Council voted in favor of landmarking the site. The Mayor did not take such action, and therefore the property now has full protections of the NYC landmarking laws (which have been upheld by the US Supreme Court). However with the application from NYU for new alterations to the site (the building of the 4th tower) the Mayor could hold additional sway, by the appointment of an independent panel, if the application is denied and NYU appeals the LPC decision.

    More from the New York City Charter:

    Chapter 74 - 3020 Landmarks Preservation Commission

    8. All landmarks, landmark sites, interior landmarks, scenic landmarks
    and historic districts designated by the commission pursuant to any
    applicable law shall be in full force and effect from and after the date
    of the action of the commission.
    Within ten days after making a
    designation, the commission shall file a copy of such designation with
    the city planning commission and the council. Within sixty days after
    such filing, the city planning commission shall (a) hold a public
    hearing on any such designation of a historic district and (b) shall
    submit to the council a report with respect to the relation of any such
    designation, whether of a historic district or a landmark, to the zoning
    resolution, projected public improvements, and any plans for the
    development, growth, improvement or renewal of the area involved. The
    city planning commission shall include with any such report its
    recommendation, if any, for council action with respect to any such
    designation of a historic district.

    9. The council may modify or disapprove by majority vote any
    designation of the landmarks preservation commission within one hundred
    twenty days
    after a copy of such designation is filed with the council
    provided that the city planning commission has submitted the report
    required above or that sixty days have elapsed since the filing of the
    designation with the council. All votes of the council pursuant to this
    section shall be filed by the council with the mayor and shall be final
    unless disapproved by the mayor within five days of such filing.
    Any
    such mayoral disapproval shall be filed by the mayor with the council
    and shall be subject to override by a two-thirds vote of the council
    within ten days of such filing
    .

    10. (a) There shall be a panel, independent of the commission,
    consisting of five members appointed by the mayor with the advice and
    consent of the council in accordance with the procedures in section
    thirty-one. Such panel shall review appeals from determinations of the
    commission denying applications for certificates of appropriateness,
    based on the grounds of hardship, to demolish, alter or reconstruct
    improvements that are exempt from real property taxes
    , provided that
    such appeals may be brought only with respect to applications made under
    applicable law on the grounds of hardship applicable only to tax-exempt
    properties.

  8. #143
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Jamaica Savings was never upheld by the City Council. Silver Towers was upheld by City Council, which made it law.
    The rarity that the article speaks of is the Council overturning the LPC designation. I know of no case at all where they upheld and later reversed.
    According to the Designation Process as found on the LPC site, landmark designation does not require the City Council to uphold it:

    6. Commission Vote.
    The Commission then votes on the designation at a public meeting. Six votes are needed to approve or deny a designation. By law, landmark designation is effective upon the Commission's vote, and all rules and regulations of the Landmarks Law are applicable.
    The City Council has the option to reverse the LPC's designation (within 120 days) however that does not necessarily mean that any action is required on their part for the designation to be considered lawful:

    8. City Council Vote.
    The City Council has 120 days from the time of the LPC filing to modify or disapprove the designation. A majority vote is required. The Mayor can veto the City Council vote within five days; the City Council can override a Mayoral veto by two-thirds vote within 10 days.
    In other words, the CC does not have to approval it, just the power to disapprove it (provided it is done within the 120 days timeframe).

    There is a big difference.

  9. #144
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    NYU's New Greenwich Village School Hinges on Expansion

    Residents decry NYU's offer to build a new school in the area in exchange for their real estate project's approval.

    By Gabriela Resto-Montero


    Greenwich Village residents said they want NYU to work with the Department of Education
    to turn this building at 75 Morton Street into a 600-seat, K-6 school.


    GREENWICH VILLAGE — NYU is ready to build an elementary school for its neighbors as part of its 2031 expansion — but there's a catch.

    The new school's construction is contingent on the success of the university's application to build a new tower in the neighborhood.

    Neighbors said that the possibility of a new school is the latest tactic NYU has used to gain approval for a controversial 400-foot tall tower in the landmark protected Silver Towers complex, designed by I.M. Pei.

    "Just because we want a school doesn't mean we need to accept a 40-story hotel in the middle of our superblock," said Jo Hamilton, chair of Community Board 2. The blocks between West 3rd Street and Houston Street from LaGuardia Place to Mercer Street are called "superblocks" for their size.

    From the beginning of its expansion plans, NYU planned to include a 600-seat, K-6 school in its development, said Gary Parker, director of government and community affairs for the university at a meeting with residents and parents Tuesday.

    But it was not clear to community members that plans for the school would indeed be folded into the larger expansion application, which includes the controversial tower.
    "Do not link this school to the success of your NYU 2031 project," said David Gruber, a community board member, to NYU officials at the meeting.

    "I'm calling on you to be a good neighbor, you use our services and we need you to give back," Gruber said of plans to build the school.

    The push to get the tower approved began in earnest last week, when NYU architects argued at a community board landmarks meeting that a fourth tower at the Silver Towers complex would add to Pei's design.

    University officials next said if the Landmarks Preservation Commission rejected the tower design within the complex then NYU would have no choice but to build at the site of the Morton Williams supermarket.

    In response to the university's presentation, Community Board 2 postponed a vote on approving the design but inidicated strong opposition to continued construction in the Washington Square Park area.

    Another point of contention between the university and the community are the possible locations for the school.

    NYU has proposed allotting space for the school in one of two buildings they plan to build at either the LaGuardia Place retail strip between West 3rd and Bleecker streets or Mercer Street between Houston and Bleecker Streets.

    Instead of building a new high-rise on the core around the university's campus, community members urged NYU to collaborate with the Department of Education to transform an existing building located at 75 Morton Street into a school.

    "It's close, it's real, it exists and with a minimum amount of resources, it could be converted," Assemblywoman Deborah Glick said at the meeting.

    Both NYU officials and community board members agreed to continue hashing out the new school through an ongoing exploratory committee, Hamilton said.

    If the city approves NYU's development plans, construction on the new school would start no sooner than 2015, Parker said.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20101117/gree...#ixzz15dP7Nh4m

  10. #145
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Massive Projects Zoned Out of the Village

    New Village rezonings could stymie NYU

    Tom Stoelker

    New zoning will affect a 100-room hotel proposed for Washington Street.

    Although larger battles loom, preservationists claimed victory last month with the passage of the Far West Village and East Village rezonings by the city council. The new regulations affect two projects in the West Village, and set the stage for a confrontation with New York University over its NYU 2031 expansion plan.



    Zoning changes in the East Village are in part a reaction to the tower behind St. Anne's Church on 12th Street (Above).
    Changes also affect a mixed-use proposal in the Far West Village at Washington and Charles Streets (below).




    The Far West Village rezoning—bound by Greenwich, Washington, and West 10th and 12th streets—imposes an 80-foot height limit and ends commercial bonuses for hotels. The rezoning will impact a 100-room hotel proposed by developer Charles Blaichman for the corner of Washington and Perry streets, and a mixed-use building proposed by brothers John and Ron Pasquale for the corner of Washington and Charles streets. John Pasquale said his company will comply. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) began a concerted letter-writing campaign in 2008 after Blaichman’s proposal came to light. Both sites sit no more than two blocks from where Jane Jacobs wrote her famed treatise.

    More reactive than proactive, proponents of the East Village rezoning began writing city officials in 2005 after developers demolished much of St. Anne’s Church on East 12th Street. Its 1847 stone facade now fronts a 26-story dorm purchased by NYU earlier this year for $134 million.

    “It was a long, hard fight in the case of the East Village. We faced a lot of resistance [from the city], but they eventually came around,” said GVSHP Executive Director Andrew Berman, crediting Councilmember Rosie Mendez in particular.

    Known as the 3rd Avenue Corridor, the rezoning includes the area between 3rd and 4th avenues and East 9th and 13th streets. New restrictions cap building heights at 120 feet and eliminate zoning bonuses for community facilities such as dorms. Most buildings in the East Village district already meet the new criteria, making the rezoning akin to a warning shot in the battle between preservationists and the university.

    “We hope the city will apply the same logic to the NYU 2031 plan,” said Berman, adding that the 400-foot tower proposal beside I.M. Pei’s Silver Towers is likely the next flashpoint. “NYU has been portraying it as community-friendly, consistent with Jane Jacobs’ urban planning, but nothing could be farther from the truth.”

    In an email, NYU’s chief spokesperson John Beckman suggested that neighborhoods undergo rezoning to update existing codes “considered out-of-date for the current development needs and desires.” Noting that NYU 2031 plans have not been affected by the rezoning, he added, “It is this philosophy of needing to put in place new mechanisms to allow appropriate development that drives us to undertake our own rezoning efforts on our own property.”

    http://www.archpaper.com/e-board_rev.asp?News_ID=4999

  11. #146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    According to the Designation Process as found on the LPC site, landmark designation does not require the City Council to uphold it:

    The City Council has the option to reverse the LPC's designation (within 120 days) however that does not necessarily mean that any action is required on their part for the designation to be considered lawful:

    In other words, the CC does not have to approval it, just the power to disapprove it (provided it is done within the 120 days timeframe).

    There is a big difference.
    You're misinterpreting the process. Designation is the law applied to private property. The LPC are not elected officials. They must hand it over to the legislative for approval. Inaction for 120 days is de facto approval.

    I don't know if the City Council debated and voted on Silver Towers. At any rate, the designation passed the final hurdle after going to the City Council and became law.

    Jamaica Savings never got out of City Council. The designation by the LPC (which was not yet law) was denied by the City Council. Jamaica Savings never became a city landmark.

    What happened with Jamaica Savings and what would have to happen with Silver Towers are entirely different. I was going to edit last night and say that I didn't know how that could be done; but Lofter already posted it.

  12. #147

    Default BREAKING: NYU Drops 40-Story Tower, But Here Comes Plan B! Thursday, November 18, 201

    NYU has routinely defeated those who have opposed the school's expansion efforts over the years, but a 93-year-old man has just derailed the Purple People Eaters' plan to build the tallest tower in Greenwich Village. The school announced that it is withdrawing its proposal to build a 38-story hotel/residential tower on the superblock containing Silver Towers, the landmarked complex designed by I.M. Pei. It was only Monday when we discussed the possibility of Pei opposing the new "Pinwheel Tower" and what that would do to NYU's plan, which needs Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.
    According to an NYU statement, Pei has informed the school that he's not on board with the glassy new building. That all but guarantees that the LPC, which would be facing immense community opposition to the building, wouldn't be very gung-ho, either. So it's victory for preservationists in the first big battle regarding the NYU 2031 plan, but here's the thing: Plan B ain't going to please too many folks, either.


    for the rest:
    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...lan_b.php#more

  13. #148

    Default

    They got what they asked for, but they're going to lose their supermarket.

  14. #149
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    They were always going to lose the supermarket.

  15. #150
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    NYU is going to eventually build something. At least for now, it will be a shorter, fatter tower instead. Nobody wins, everybody loses.

Page 10 of 29 FirstFirst ... 6789101112131420 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Morgan Library & Museum Expansion - 29 East 36th Street - by Renzo Piano
    By NoyokA in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: October 29th, 2010, 09:57 AM
  2. Lower East Side Tenement Museum fights for expansion
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 6th, 2010, 06:38 PM
  3. Huge Expansion For Kings Plaza
    By muscle1313 in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: February 3rd, 2010, 07:25 AM
  4. Expansion of Museum of Jewish Heritage
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: November 9th, 2003, 06:12 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software