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Thread: New York University Expansion

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    Do they own them? Should the city seize them by eminent domain, and serve them up on a silver platter?
    I doubt that they own them. Eminent Domain would be fine with me though it's not practical in the whining/complaining capital of the world. Therefore, buying these Ps of S is the only option.

  2. #17

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    Actually I agree with you , londonlawyer, about that building with the Staples. My bad.

    I had in mind that wonderful organic jangle of roofs and terraces a bit further down the avenue. Just sort-of happened over time as back yard construction. It stayed hidden until the avenue's widening revealed it.

  3. #18

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    I think I know the site you're referring to. It has some very nice old buildings on it. I would not want to see that touched, but I've always hated these crap buildings above the subway.

  4. #19

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    The governors island campus doesnt make too much sense logistically, they would need ferries running back and forth every hour for a few students. And what if you miss the ferry by a minute, miss a class or an exam.

    I think sprucing up the health corridor and downtown Brooklyn would be great though.

  5. #20
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Open House: NYU 2031-Strategy for Future Growth

    NYU is having an open house to discuss its strategy for future growth in New York City.
    The open house is scheduled for Wednesday, April 14th, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South, 10th Floor.
    Refreshments will be served and activities for children will be provided.

  6. #21
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    NYU Presents 25-Year Growth Strategy

    NYU 2031

    The PLAN

    Strategy Calls for Thoughtful Growth in Health Corridor,
    Downtown Brooklyn, Governors Island, and NYU’s Existing Properties


    After a three-year dialogue with its neighbors, NYU is set to present its strategy – NYU 2031: NYU in NYC -- to ensure that its facilities keep pace with the academic aims that have propelled the University to the ranks of the nation’s top research universities.

    NYU 2031: NYU in NYC is a framework for how and where NYU should develop space for its academic mission. The strategy envisions the addition of as much as 6 million sq. ft. of space over more than two decades, with half spread over three remote locations -- along Manhattan’s Eastside health corridor, in Downtown Brooklyn, and on Governors Island – and half in or near its core.

    The process employed to create this vision – guided by input from the Community Task Force on NYU Development established by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer -- was a significant departure from the University’s previous approach to development, setting a new standard for community dialogue, transparency and practicality. Consistent with the emphasis on intensive community involvement, NYU will host another of its numerous “Open Houses” about the strategy on April 14 from 5:30 – 8:00 PM on the 10th floor of the Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Sq. So.

    NYU President John Sexton said, “Academic excellence is the driver of all we do. This is a pivotal moment for NYU, both as an academic institution and as an integral player in New York’s evolving landscape. We are committed – through a productive discourse -- to a sensitive and sustainable approach to preserve the special character of our core campus, while maintaining the strength and vibrancy of our intellectual community into the future.”

  7. #22
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    NYU Plans for Downtown Brooklyn







    NYU released more information earlier this week about its long-term plans for Downtown Brooklyn as part of its NYU 2031 master plan. In addition to building a tower or two along Jay Street (which it has the air rights to do), the plan aims strengthen the campus feel around Metrotech. Academic areas that could be expanded in the area include science, continuing ed, and arts; according to the Brooklyn Eagle, the university is looking to increase its presence in the area from 700,000 square feet to about a million square feet. The third slide shows where one small tower and one very large tower could be built along Jay Street and the fifth slide show where a new "campus walk" would form the spine of the campus parallel to Jay Street. This is pretty exciting: It could be the tipping point for Downtown Brooklyn becoming a truly vibrant 24-7 community.

    NYU Details Plans To Transform Polytechnic Institute [Brooklyn Eagle]
    NYU 2031: Downtown Brooklyn [NYU]

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...lans_for_d.php

  8. #23
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    At N.Y.U. Open House for Expansion Plans, Simmering Civility

    By Roland Li


    An earlier rendering of a possible new tower in N.Y.U.'s Silver Towers complex.

    Another publicity salvo was exchanged on Wednesday evening between N.Y.U. and local preservation groups, as a throng of residents waved signs outside the Kimmel Center on Washington Square South, protesting the university's expansion plans. This preempted the school's open house inside detailing an ambitious plan that calls for up to six million square feet of additional space throughout Greenwich Village, a First Avenue corridor, downtown Brooklyn, and potentially Governor's Island.

    Although details of the plan have been public for the last few weeks, the event offered a physical setting, on the 10th floor of the Kimmel Center, overlooking Washington Square Park, for local residents, school officials and the general public to coalesce. And while such results could very well have been explosive, it's a testament to the university's well-oiled publicity machine that the exchanges appeared calm, perhaps even genial, especially in contrast to the anger displayed outside the building.

    The room was arranged with a circular perimeter of displays that detailed the various segments of the school's expansion plans, in the same style as the clean, bright aesthetic of its new Web site. In the center were models of proposed new development, arranged like toy blocks, as well as fruit, crackers, cheese and beverages. It was in the same style as previous open houses, which date back to 2007, more akin to a gallery opening than a community board meeting.

    The results were effective. Even the most hardened opponents of expansion, wearing white stickers with maxims like, "40 Story Towers? No Way," were hard-pressed not to indulge in free food, and the sheer magnitude of the room atomized what had been a vocal, angry mob into concerned individuals, not nearly as overpowering.

    But still, the opposition's convictions were clear. In the same tradition of, say, Stuyvesant Town residents vs. Tishman Speyer, they were the local underdog, going toe-to-toe with the powerful institution, with the strength of their neighborhood behind them. And if there is one focal point for the opposition movement, it has to be Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. Mr. Berman is almost reflexively quoted whenever N.Y.U. does something controversial, much like Congressman Daniel Garodnick was the central opposition figure of Stuyvesant Town.

    "We would really like NYU to preserve the balance of the community," said Mr. Berman, who wants the school to bring new development outside the Village. He proposed moving the Stern Business School to the Financial District and the film branch of the Tisch School to Long Island City, where there is an active filmmaking industry. "They've taken some baby steps in the right direction," he added, referring to the school's more receptive approach toward the community, but he isn't satisfied.

    N.Y.U.'s position, on the other hand, is all about big ideas. Aggressive expansion has transformed what was historically a commuter-driven college into one of the country's premier research institutions, and this, from the school's perspective, is simply the next, natural step. It's the same ambition that has made New York great, the school argues in one of its pamphlets.

    The school is also fond of using stats to boost its image: 1.4 million hours of community service by N.Y.U. students in 2008-2009; $30 million in uncompensated dental care from the College of Dentistry each year. By contrast, the school has only 160 square feet per student as of 2006, while the Ivys have upward of 800 square feet per student. Give us enough space, N.Y.U. seems to suggest, and we can do anything.

    However, John Beckman, a spokesman for N.Y.U., is a bit more pragmatic.

    "This strategy recognizes that the Greenwich Village area cannot accommodate all the space N.Y.U. needs," he said. "If we can't develop it remotely, we'll do without it." He didn't rule out the Financial District or Long Island City as possibilities, if current sites do not pan out. The school plans to borrow loans and stage another fundraising campaign to fund the expansion; it raised over $3 billion in seven years in its last effort.

    Among the most controversial additions within the Village is a proposed 40-story tower in the historic district south of Washington Square Park, which would be used to house faculty and visiting academics. But as past proposals have shown, the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which must approve all development in a historic district, will often trim exceptionally large buildings.

    Right now, nothing is certain. As noted by the university, six million is the maximum amount of space it seeks, and the expansion plans are more of a sketch than a finished product.

    "You don't want to be in a position where you have an academic need, and you have financing, and you don't have a plan," said Mr. Beckman, but he added, "This framework is not an obligation."

    The Department of City Planning, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, the City Council and the mayor will all be involved in the lengthy approval process, which will take years. But the next clash will come much sooner: Community Board 2 has a meeting scheduled on April 19.

    http://www.observer.com/2010/real-es...ering-civility

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Among the most controversial additions within the Village is a proposed 40-story tower in the historic district south of Washington Square Park, which would be used to house faculty and visiting academics. But as past proposals have shown, the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which must approve all development in a historic district, will often trim exceptionally large buildings.
    The proposed ~ 40-story tower is not in an "historic district" but rather on part of the parcel containing the I.M. Pei Silver Towers complex, which recently received Landmark designation.

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Well, there goes the quiet haven. Does all urban space need activity?

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  12. #27
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    NYU Presents 25-Year Growth Strategy:
    cancerous consumption of the Village

    make em build elsewhere!

  13. #28

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    ^ Can't find the link.

  14. #29
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The spot seen here, right where Greene intersects Bleecker, is precisely where NYU proposes to build the ~ 40-story tower, obliterating the site line downtown and closing off part of Greene Street ...

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post


  15. #30

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    Isn't that new tower really proposed between Wooster and West Broadway?

    In any case --precisely because it's at ground level-- the space between Silver Towers has none of the magic of the elevated space between the twin slabs of Washington Square village, where you can read a book or smoke a joint.

    Two of my life's most important conversations took place in this space: both with women, both secure in our privacy. Elsewhere in New York, you have to go to Central Park to get that kind of seclusion --and even there you can't be sure of it. (Here comes the coke dealer.)
    Last edited by ablarc; May 3rd, 2010 at 12:25 PM.

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