Page 7 of 29 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 428

Thread: New York University Expansion

  1. #91
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    More on NYU's proposed changes on the superblocks and the approvals required:

    NYU Releases 20 Year Expansion Plan

    ANTHEMION
    GVSHP Newsletter
    Summer 2010

    University’s Growth Rate Would Double, But Only If Given Public Approvals

    ... NYU’s proposal would add 1.5 million square feet of space* to several blocks south and east of Washington Square Park, another 1.5 milllion square feet of space to unspecified locations throughout the Village, East Village, and NoHo ...

    The 1.5 million square feet NYU wishes to add to the blocks south and east of Washington Square would require many layers of public approvals, and thus their fate is still to be determined. NYU is seeking to change the zoning for these nine blocks from residential to commercial, change the zoning to lift the current requirements for preserving open space, get the city to give them several pieces of public land on Bleecker, Mercer and West 3rd Streets and LaGuardia Place (some of which are currently occupied by public parks), and get the city to lift deed restrictions attached to formerly publicly-owned land which prohibit any new construction until 2021.

    ... a 38-story hotel on Bleecker Street – the tallest building ever constructed in the Village – and several other massive structures in the surrounding blocks. The hotel plan must also overcome the high hurdle of approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, since it is within the I.M. Pei-designed Silver Towers complex, for which GVSHP secured landmark status in 2008.

    *NOTE: 1.5 million square feet = TWO (2) Javits Convention Centers (~ 700,000 sf)

  2. #92
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    At the August 9 CB2 meeting, NYU revealed some previously undisclosed details about their plan for the superblocks, specifically the size and capacity of the mixed-use "Zipper Building" to be built on Mercer Street (replacing the ~ 2-story Coles Gym building):

    Groans as N.Y.U. pitches its plan; New mega-dorm in mix

    THE VILLAGER
    By Albert Amateau
    August 12, 2010

    New York University last week submitted its plan to Community Board 2 to add 6 million square feet of space in the next few decades — most of it in the Greenwich Village area — in preparation for going to the Department of City Planning in the fall to lock into place its long-term mega-project.

    ... The heart of the expansion plans — known collectively as N.Y.U 2031 — is the development of between 1.5 million and 2.2 million square feet on the two superblocks the university owns between LaGuardia Place and Mercer St. The northern superblock, between W. Third and Bleecker Sts., is occupied by Washington Square Village. The southern superblock, between Bleecker and Houston Sts., includes Silver Towers and the Coles Sports Center.

    ... Village residents who packed the two meetings were loud and clear in their opposition to developing the superblock sites. They repeatedly demanded that N.Y.U. look outside the Village for expansion. Many wore tags that read “Financial District Yes, Village No,” distributed by the Community Action Alliance on NYU 2031, a newly formed coalition of about 15 Village neighborhood associations. The alliance statement says that it is “working…to ensure that N.Y.U.’s growth plans do not destroy the qualities of our neighborhood we hold dear.”

    Jo Hamilton, C.B. 2 chairperson, said at the Aug. 9 meeting that the board would ask the university some hard questions.

    “We want N.Y.U. to tell us what they are building, why they are building it and why does it have to be in our neighborhood rather than someplace else?” Hamilton said.

    Alicia Hurley, N.Y.U. vice president for government affairs and community engagement, said the university was planning about half of its total expansion outside of the Village. But, regarding the focus on the superblocks, at one point, she said, “It’s our home.” Again, in response to more superblock questions, she said, “It’s our own property — we can develop it incrementally [rather than all at once].”

    “The Financial District is looking to diversify,” Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, said at the Aug. 9 meeting. “Why is it not possible to accommodate 3 million square feet of growth outside of our neighborhood?” added Berman.

    ... Although the university’s brochure on its plan outlines possibilities for “remote” expansion, it does not include the Financial District.

    Hurley, however, said, “We have had meetings with the Port Authority [about potential Downtown development] and we’ve received several offers of space Downtown, but we have to decide whether they satisfy our academic needs and whether they fit our financial plans.”

    One real estate broker, who asked to remain anonymous, told The Villager that she presented N.Y.U. with more than 350,000 square feet of alternative space near the World Trade Center site on behalf of a property owner whom she declined to identify.

    ... Will Haas, N.Y.U. director of planning, outlined some specifics of the superblock plans. On the Silver Towers/Coles block, the university plans to build a 36-story fourth tower, taller than the three I.M. Pei-designed residential buildings, with a total of 275,000 square feet for faculty apartments and a 100-unit hotel to accommodate visitors and guests attending university events.

    The current one-story Morton Williams supermarket on LaGuardia Place would be demolished and be replaced by public open space. A supermarket would be developed below grade on one of the superblocks.

    The Aug. 9 audience groaned at the announcement that the current Coles gymnasium on the Mercer St. side of the southern superblock would be replaced by a dormitory of 13 to 17 stories and 160 to 200 feet tall to accommodate 1,400 students.

    On the Washington Square Village superblock, the university plans to retain the existing residential buildings facing W. Third and Bleecker Sts. and add two new academic buildings between them facing LaGuardia Place and Mercer St.

    Of the 1.5 million to 2.2 million square feet of new development in the two superblocks, 30 percent would be below grade, Haas said.

    “I’m still not ready to accept 3 million square feet of development in the superblocks and the surrounding neighborhood,” said David Gruber, chairperson of the C.B. 2 Institutions Committee and a member of the now-suspended Stringer task force. Gruber also questioned N.Y.U.’s intention to seek a single ULURP for all of the superblock development — since the projects would be done in phases, making the whole plan take from 20 to 40 years to complete. “It seems that you’re asking for a long-term development line of credit,” Gruber said.

    ... At one point during the Aug. 9 meeting after an N.Y.U. reference to the university’s “Washington Square core,” members of the audience shouted, “It’s not your core campus, it’s our neighborhood.”

  3. #93
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    'Inside' lobby work

    Commish 'conflict'

    By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN

    Why lobby others when you can lobby yourself?

    Two part-time city commissioners who work fulltime as lobbyists are paid tens of thousands of dollars by clients who stand to gain from the commissions on which their conflicted lobbyists serve.

    Landmarks Preservation Commissioner Margery Perlmutter is on New York University's payroll to lobby for the school's large-scale expansion -- which first needs a green light from Perlmutter's commission, according to lobbying records.

    Meanwhile, Taxi and Limousine Commissioner Harry Giannoulis is the president of a lobbying firm that represents an alternative-energy group that wants vehicles to run on biodiesel.

    Perlmutter and two of her colleagues at the Bryan Cave lobby firm have been paid more than $42,000 by NYU to lobby the Landmarks Commission and seven other agencies for approval to build in the heart of Greenwich Village. Among its plans is a 385-foot skyscraper.

    Perlmutter plans to recuse herself from the commission's vote, a source said.

    Since joining the unpaid commission four years ago, Perlmutter has gained a reputation as pro-preservation and critical of high-rise projects like NYU's.

    "It would truly be a shame if NYU were able to buy the silence of one of the strongest voices on the commission by hiring the firm she works for to represent them," said preservationist Andrew Berman.

    The city's Conflicts of Interest Board warned Perlmutter in 2006 to steer clear of landmark matters in her day job as a lawyer and lobbyist at Bryan Cave -- and not to share in her firm's profits from lobbying her commission.

    Perlmutter told The Post there was no conflict because she claims her work for NYU is limited to the parts of the plan that don't require approval from her commission.

    "There are many components -- it's a huge project -- and I'm not involved in the landmarks component," she said.

    Giannoulis of the TLC lobbies for the National Biodiesel Board.

    He declined to comment.

    A source said the biodiesel group hired Giannoulis' Parkside Group to track heating-oil legislation, and that Parkside doesn't work on the biodiesel board's transportation agenda.

    There are currently 580 lobbyists in the city -- up from 378 just three years ago, according to the City Clerk's Office.

    Several former City Council members are lobbyists, including Ken Fisher, Melinda Katz, Peter Vallone Sr. and Ed Wallace.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/i...#ixzz0wr1PKE11

  4. #94
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    NYU's Answer to Religious Strife Rises on Washington Square South

    August 24, 2010, by Pete




    (click to enlarge)

    Across from the festive fountain in Washington Square Park steel is rising tall for the new NYU Center for Academic and Spiritual Life. Given the cosmic kerfuffle taking place further downtown, one might think this building is chicken soup for the soul of our fair city. Not so fast! The design, by Boston-based Machado and Silvetti Associates, was recently described by disgruntled critic James S. Russell as "a sallow coffin on stilts" decorated with "tree-form patterns that imbue no life whatever." Let us pray...that it comes out better looking than that.

    Big bands of I-beams framing the building have gone in above Thompson Street, where real leafy trees recently stood. From a pit dug 30 feet down, beefy columns are shooting up, eclipsing the brick and terra cotta steeple of McKim, Mead and White's old Judson Memorial Church across the street. There is some good news here: The framework is covering up NYU's Kimmel Center next door. The bad news: The Center's boxy plan will leave exposed Kimmel's upper floors on the west, a hodgepodge of glass and brick rising above the park and facing the blunt butt end of another NYU newcomer, the barrel-roofed Furman Hall. The Center for Academic and Spiritual Life is set to open in 2012, barring any Mayan-predicted apocalypses.

    58 Washington Square South - Center for Academic and Spiritual Life [NYU Construction]
    New York University Assails Greenwich Village [Bloomberg]
    Center for Academic and Spiritual Life coverage [Curbed]

    http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showth...l=1#post286634

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...south.php#more

  5. #95
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Wilf Hall Not Bad By NYU Standards

    Matt Chaban


    Wilf Hall (Courtesy Archidose)

    Yesterday, John Hill, arguably the city’s most prolific architecture critic, finished up one of his latest projects, entitled “31 in 31.” In addition to his usual flood of posts, Hill is chronicling one building every day in August, in preparation for a new guide book. The buildings are scattershot, ranging from the new Crocs super store in the West Village to One Bryant Park, but most of them are new and, in a way Hill always seems to manage, representative of precisely what has been going on in the city recently—not comprehensive, but authoritative. It’s a rundown worth running down, but one building in particular caught our eye: the rather unassuming Wilf Hall at NYU.


    Not a bad piece of facadism. The old Provincetown Playhouse
    can be seen at lower left. (Courtesy Archidose)

    The project is not yet complete, but it caused quite a stir when it was proposed. Local preservationists objected to the project because it would destroy the Provincetown Playhouse, where Arthur Miller got his start, as well as the home of a number of other old, long-gone bohemian haunts. (Granted prerservationists object when NYU sneezes.) Even though the project is not located in a historic district, master faker Morris Adjmi was brought in, an architect known for his historically sensitive work, including the Scholastic Building in Soho and the High Line Building across from the Standard.

    Here, Adjmi appears to have pulled off a very nice set of four modern rowhouses, rather prettier ones than the building it replaced. The retained and restored facade of the Provincetown Playhouse is particularly notable for how draws attention to the historic structure, highlighting it instead of hiding it. It is a refreshing building after so much massive development by the university, from Philip Johnson’s unusual Bobst Library to the downright awful Kimmel Center. It would seem this is the first project from NYU to make good on its promise to respect the scale and architecture of the Village—a promise that may not hold if its bombshell of an expansion plan is approved in the coming months and years.

    So what does Andrew Berman, head of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and leading NYU antagonist think of Adjmi’s building? He is not impressed, to say the least. In response to a query from the Observer, he sent over the following email:
    The Provincetown Playhouse and Apartments was one of the most historically and culturally significant buildings in New York City, and should never have been demolished. It was the home not only of the world-famous theater, but of a collection of institutions which were called by historians “the cornerstone of bohemia” and “the locus of cultural activity and the gathering places of all the figures associated with the Greenwich Village Renaissance that began the era of Modernism in the U.S.” The entire building had been determined eligible for the State and National Register of Historic Places, and for a mere increase of 17,000 sq. ft.of space NYU chose to demolish rather than renovate or reuse the building, though only five years earlier they had demolished several other historic edifices including the Poe House and Judson Houses just across the street to make way for yet another mammoth Law School building. To add insult to injury, NYU’s promise to preserve in perpetuity about 5% of the original building was secretly compromised when, behind construction walls, they actually demolished part of the tiny theater space and kept that fact hidden, which was only revealed by vigilant neighbors and GVSHP.
    Is the new building less overwhelming and oppressive than many other recent NYU projects? Of course, but it would be a shame if that were the sliding scale by which we judged the university. Wilf Hall will sadly always be a monument to the university’s broken promises and greed, and to the loss of yet another irreplaceable piece of New York’s proud history.
    So much for community outreach.

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/8728

  6. #96

    Default

    As I mentioned in the other thread, NYU filed plans for a 1 msf, 408-foot medical tower on 34th and the FDR It'll be designed by Ennead Architects, formerly Polshek.

    Permit:
    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01


    This will have a very large impact on the skyline. It will rise south of-across 34th St. from River Gate (315'). River Gate is the ugly residential tower with the clumsy setbacks.


  7. #97
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    This evening at 6:30 CB2 will hold a public meeting regarding NYU's proposed land use changes:

    UPCOMING MEETINGS:

    September 20, 2010 – Presentation by NYU about the zoning actions that will be proposed in their ULURP application (click here to view our calendar)

    JOINT ARTS & INSTITUTIONS & LAND USE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    David Gruber, Chair, David Reck, Chair

    Mon., 9/20 @ 6:30 PM –P. S. 41, 116 West 11th St. Auditorium

    *Presentation by NYU of the proposals for land use changes in the superblocks and blocks east of Washington Square Park that will be part of their ULURP application for NYU Plan 2031.

    JOIN CB2 IN REVIEWING THE NYU EXPANSION PROPOSAL

    In April 2010, New York University announced NYU Plan 2031, their long-term strategy for growth. They are proposing to add 3 million square feet in our neighborhood, with estimated 1.5 million square feet within the Washington Square core. This is one of the largest projects to come before our community in many years, and the outcome will have a profound effect on our district for generations to come.

    CB2 is committed to do everything we can to ensure that NYU is not allowed to overwhelm our neighborhoods.

    We need your input and your participation, and have established this website to make sure you are fully informed, and have a place to let us know what you think. Check in regularly for updates.

    THE LATEST:

    • CB 2 wrote again to President Sexton, pressing the University for real answers to our questions about what is being suggested for the Washington Square core and why it can’t go elsewhere (click here).
    • NYU response letter (click here).
    • Land Use Proposals (click here).
    • Urban Renewal History (click here)
    • NYU 2031-an overview (click here)

  8. #98
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default The Front Man for NYU Expansion

    Slick as ice -- but a lot less transparent ...

    Thank You for Not Hating N.Y.U.

    CAPITAL NY
    BY SARAH LASKOW
    Sep. 29, 2010

    If New York University had compromised with its neighbors back in 1965, Alicia Hurley’s office would have a less impressive view. Hurley, the university’s vice president for government affairs and community engagement, works from the top floor of Bobst Library, the massive red building on the south side of Washington Square Park, and her wide window looks out over the treetops and onto Greenwich Village, spread out below.

    In the 50s or '60s, it would have fallen to someone in Hurley’s position to listen to Village residents argue that Bobst was too large, too expensive and too alien to be allowed. Today, Hurley spends much of her time listening to similar arguments about N.Y.U.’s plans to add an additional 3 million square feet to its real-estate holdings in the Village and explaining why and how the school will go forward with its buildings anyway.

    With this latest expansion, N.Y.U. is trying harder than ever before to present a friendly face to a neighborhood that for decades has rallied against its development projects. The anger about N.Y.U.’s expansion focuses on the insistence of the university—an entity whose profile is increasingly global, and corporate—that it belongs in the Village, one of the few places in Manhattan, as long-time Villagers say, where you can still see the sky.

    Hurley is N.Y.U.’s primary ambassador to its neighbors, and when she descends from the 12th floor of Bobst, she carries that chilly corporatism with her, in the form of a coterie of lawyers, sharp PowerPoint presentations, and bland, purposeful phrases to describe plans that will mean, in some cases, tearing down homes.

    But after she spars at public hearings with Village activists and community board members, taking punches for N.Y.U., she makes it a point to turn right around and kiss her opponents on the cheek at fund-raisers and community events.

    Hurley likens her job to working in the office of an elected official.

    “We’re like every local political office,” she said, in an interview arranged after an extended back-and-forth about this article. “We’re essentially doing constituent services and construction mitigation.”

    Hurley’s uniform tends to be a straight bob and streamlined, black outfits, and at community meetings she’ll stand for hours taking criticism from neighborhood activists; she knows just what kind of comments will set off angry hisses and boos at community meetings.

    On N.Y.U.’s terms, at least, Hurley and her team are succeeding. In its 2031 plan, which lays out the school’s future ambitions, N.Y.U. encompasses its community-engagement goals with the term “awareness,” and is more concerned with being transparent about its plans than actually winning support for them ...

    FULL ARTICLE

    ***

    An early render for one of the super blocks (now removed from the NYU website) ...



    The more recent plan for that block:






  9. #99
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Somebody should work up a render of the proposed plan as seen along Mercer Street (where the big boomerang building reaches its fullest height -- and NYU proposes building it right out to the sidewalk by acquiring land now controlled by DOT and where a playground now exists). That height in conjunction with the proposed 17-story "zipper" along Mercer one block to the south will create quite the canyon here -- which NYU claims is "contextual" but only so because the height / bulk markers they use are the NYU buildings that are, for the most part, non-contextual with almost anything nearby.

    A local resident offers his POV ...

    tag me with a spoon

    capitalnewyork:


    This article would be better if it contained more detailed info about NYU’s plans to destroy the Village and East Village. What it does explain — buried near the end — is scary: NYU plans to “demap” a big chunk of the area south of Washington Square Park, my emphasis:

    Last week, for instance, she spent more than two hours in P.S. 41’s auditorium, acting as buffer between neighborhood residents and the lawyers she’d brought along to explain N.Y.U.’s latest land-use proposals, which include demapping stretches of Bleecker, LaGuardia, West 3rd and Mercer Streets, and changing the zoning of areas to the south and east of Washington Square Park. The demapping proposal—which would deliver the land to N.Y.U.—was the first one to elicit hisses from the audience. The presentation was interrupted intermittently thereafter by boos and angry questions.

    Make no mistake, they are going to be tearing down homes if they get their way:

    At this meeting, the speakers were mostly older, and while some asked questions about the zoning plan, others gave prepared speeches about N.Y.U.’s wrong-headedness. The very last speaker said he lived at 15 Washington Place, and asked if N.Y.U. was going to tear down his building. Hurley replied that 15 Washington Place was “a site identified as one that could be converted.” In other words, yes, maybe.

    The sad thing is, NYU did this once before, destroying the area above Houston between Laguardia and Mercer with the help of New York City. As Hurley, the NYU community flack tells it:

    She also pointed out, consolingly, that N.Y.U. first took possession of the superblocks as part of a slum-clearing project in the 1950s, but that N.Y.U. was “not the one who bulldozed those blocks.”

    She smiled broadly, for maybe the first time that night. “That was Robert Moses.”

    Hah, “consolingly” - nice one. Here’s what actually happened, as narrated by Marc Eliot in Death Of A Rebel (a bio of Phil Ochs):

    The first warm breeze of spring [1959] brought the announcement by the City of New York that a nine-square-block area of Greenwich Village, from Third Street to Houston, from Mercer to La Guardia, had been condemned. It was seen as no less than peacetime ethnocide by the Italian and German residents, and spelled financial ruin for the neighborhood merchants. The store owners formed a group and obtained legal counsel. After a long, bitter, and confusing fight in the city’s courts, it looked as though the people had won their battle. The condemnation order was thrown out. Relative calm was restored in the community, only to be shattered once again six months later. The city machinery moved quietly, political oil keeping the parts from squeaking. New York obtained a higher-court reversal—the condemnation order became law.

    Curiously, it was later discovered, the city paid seven dollars a square foot for the condemned property and sold it at fifteen dollars per to New York University. By then, it was too late to stop the derricks that bit into the generations of Greenwich Village homes and destroyed the century-old neighborhood. The families were relocated, dissipated throughout the five boroughs.

    Go look at the ugly, Brutalist towers standing in that area now that replaced the historic section. Do not be charmed by NYU’s community relations flacks whose job is “explaining why and how the school will go forward with its buildings anyway,” ugh. Their goal is to expand the area described above and turn it into their campus, destroying a historic neighborhood in the process. The Cap article quotes NYU as saying they “cannot let space constraints limit its academic ambitions.” No, they can’t, but we can.

  10. #100

    Default

    NYU could be allowed to build much taller to reduce the amount of footprint its buildings take up.

    It's footprint that destroys community, not height or density.

  11. #101
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    These buildings they're proposing would be the tallest in the area. They can't even go this big without major re-zoning.

    They could build bigger and taller than that farther downtown with no problem whatsoever. In fact they've been invited to do so and no doubt could cut some very good deals.

  12. #102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    These buildings they're proposing would be the tallest in the area. They can't even go this big without major re-zoning.
    Re-zoning is what I'm talking about. The low-rise envelope has already been busted by Washington Square Village and the Pei towers.

    You make it sound like you think zoning is immutable. I know that's not so (since --sorry-- I specialize in rezoning down here in the boondocks).

  13. #103
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    I know it's not immutable.

    But it's fairly hilarious that NYU says the "contextual" envelope of the area should be decided by existing NYU buildings on 3 large blocks, all of which tower over buildings to the south and west (and to some degree to the east and north). Many of those buildings required a specific zoning variance(s) to rise higher and bulkier than allowable under the zoning text.

    So, while the low-rise envelope has been busted, that doesn't mean that the bust line should be the new starting point.

    For this area it's also more than about the size of the buildings. NYU has so far not specifically stated WHY they need these buildings (or why they need them HERE). Rather, they just want to get their ducks in a row to cover possibilities over the next 20 years. As a recent speaker at a public meeting pointed out, it's more like NYU (when requesting the huge zoning upgrades) is asking for a zoning credit line rather than for changes to fulfill a building plan that is specfic and necessary. Plus, there is the infrastructure required to support the big increase in size at NYU (schools, fire protection, police, transportation, etc.). Note that NYU is a Private Non-Profit Tax Exempt Organization and pays no property taxes. part of that deal is that NYU must provide for the "Public Good." Balancing that out is what we're talking about.

  14. #104

  15. #105
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    NYU Begins Landmarks Commission Fight for Pinwheel Tower

    October 7, 2010, by Sara



    A key part of NYU's plan for world domination NYU 2031 expansion plan is the 40-story "Pinwheel Tower" on the Bleecker Street side of the landmarked, I.M. Pei-designed Silver Towers complex. Community rage hasn't done anything to stem the plans so far, but there's another potential roadblock in the form of the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will have to okay an addition to the complex. NYU filed an application with the Landmarks Commission today, Crain's reports, and it should hand back a decision in a few months. Commence nailbiting, Villagers! The process involves an advisory vote from Community Board 2, at least one Landmarks hearing, and then a vote. Plan B is a new NYU tower on the corner of Bleecker and LaGuardia, so perhaps the Morton Williams supermarket currently on the block should prepare itself.

    NYU says fourth tower's best for landmarked site [Crain's]
    NYU Tower Proposal Not so Warmly Welcomed by Villagers [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...heel_tower.php

Page 7 of 29 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Morgan Library & Museum Expansion - 29 East 36th Street - by Renzo Piano
    By NoyokA in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: October 29th, 2010, 09:57 AM
  2. Lower East Side Tenement Museum fights for expansion
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 6th, 2010, 06:38 PM
  3. Huge Expansion For Kings Plaza
    By muscle1313 in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: February 3rd, 2010, 07:25 AM
  4. Expansion of Museum of Jewish Heritage
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: November 9th, 2003, 06:12 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software