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Thread: Vehicle Security Center (VSC) at World Trade Center

  1. #496

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    Here's a shot of the VSC from WTC Progress on Facebook, including the church plot. Notice the two square-shaped cutouts at the bottom of the picture, near the South Bridge. I'm assuming these are where the support pylons will go.

  2. #497

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    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know how the height of Liberty Park (at its highest point) compares with that of the original Austin J. Tobin Plaza and 130 Liberty Plaza?

    They all seem to be at approximately the same height at any given point based on the following logic:
    1) When the South Bridge is conjoined with the VSC, the elevation of the bridge's floor (approximately) matches that of Liberty Park.
    2) The South Bridge is at the same elevation as the former North Bridge, as the corridors between them (within the WFC) remain level.
    3) When the former North Bridge was conjoined with the WTC, the elevation of the bridge's floor matched that of the original Austin J. Tobin Plaza.
    4) The bridge between the original Austin J. Tobin Plaza and the original 130 Liberty Plaza remained level across its span.

    And another point: the South Bridge was originally intended to connect with a structure of the same elevation, because that hypothetical structure would potentially feature another bridge to the original 130 Liberty Plaza, itself featuring access to the original Austin J. Tobin Plaza.

    If my logic is flawed, please let me know.
    Last edited by Enigmatism415; July 27th, 2014 at 12:37 PM.

  3. #498
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I think your analysis is correct, regarding how the level of this park compares with former WTC Tobin Plaza.

    Due to the elevated location, this park could turn out to be a much needed area of quiet & calm at the WTC.

    On the other hand, with direct access from the west via the pedestrian bridge to World Financial Center and Battery Park City, it could become a much traveled raised sidewalk. Given that there are no elevators on the east end of the park, I'd be willing to bet that 75%+ of the foot traffic here will be moving through the park from west to east.

    Whichever way it works out, this is going to be a terrific addition to the neighborhood.

  4. #499

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Whichever way it works out, this is going to be a terrific addition to the neighborhood.
    I wholeheartedly agree. In both utility and aesthetics, this little park is a highly underrated component of the overall complex; it's also the only component that I regard as an unequivocal improvement over what was there (or perhaps wasn't there) before 9/11.

    To really sweeten the space, I hope that the architect of the eventual 5WTC designs a lobby mezzanine featuring direct access to Liberty Park, so that it connects with the rest of the complex more seamlessly (as the original 7WTC did).

  5. #500

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enigmatism415 View Post
    I wholeheartedly agree. In both utility and aesthetics, this little park is a highly underrated component of the overall complex; it's also the only component that I regard as an unequivocal improvement over what was there (or perhaps wasn't there) before 9/11.
    True, the public spaces that surrounded the north and west base sections of the former WTC was an oddly configured and isolated network of outdoor corridors. I used to take short-cuts through those back sections and there were not many pedestrians because nobody but me knew about them; but there were small homeless encampments, couples having al fresco sexual encounters, and the occasional person engaging in unlawful public urination. I must admit: I was often guilty of that last aforementioned offence of public urination.....LOL

  6. #501

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    It looks like they're dismantling the east face of the South Bridge to prepare for the extension.

  7. #502

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    A few trees have been planted on the roof (Liberty Park).

    Related: The bridge over West St was closed on May 11th, and will remain closed until the park opens. First order of business is to dismantle the temporary bridge on a weekend. I wonder if the bridge will get a new facade. Several pieces are damaged, and up close, the whole thing looks crummy. A few drums of Noxon?

    The genius of good timing: Brookfield decided that right now is a good time to close the red bridge over Liberty St. It will be closed at least for the rest of the year while it's gutted and rebuilt. I heard more glassy. All that beautiful polished stone ripped up.

    The Fargo People will have to wander about in traffic. Worried about them.

  8. #503

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    New York Times
    May 19, 2015

    Leafy Refuge in Liberty Park for Residents Annoyed by Construction

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    Workers setting up a honey locust, one of 54 trees that will dot Liberty Park. The elevated acre of land will provide a walkway between the financial district and Battery Park City.

    There is almost nothing neighborly about the neighborhood south of the World Trade Center.

    Truly a war zone 14 years ago, it has since been a nonstop demolition and construction site. Residents’ needs have rarely prevailed.

    Patricia L. Moore, who has lived at 125 Cedar Street since 1977, serves Community Board 1 as the chairwoman of its quality-of-life committee.

    “The joke is: We have none,” she said. “We’re struggling to try to find some.”

    A small bit of hope has arrived, in leaf. A 15-foot serviceberry tree was planted Monday as the first in the new Liberty Park.

    The elevated park is a bit more than an acre, on the rooftop of an entrance structure leading to the trade center’s underground vehicle security center. It is bounded by Liberty, West, Cedar and Greenwich Streets. The park will share the rooftop with the St. Nicholas National Shrine, a successor to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, which stood on the site until Sept. 11, 2001, when it was crushed.

    “The hottest, newest park in New York City is the High Line,” Patrick J. Foye, the executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, said. “At the World Trade Center, the Port Authority is building what will also be a popular, widely used, elevated, linear park.”


    A worker installed stone paneling in Liberty Park. A construction official said he hoped the park would be open early next year.

    The cost of Liberty Park is estimated at $50 million.

    Ms. Moore said authority officials had “really worked with the community” to modify the park design and take the neighbors’ concerns into account.

    “We have enough people going back and forth,” Ms. Moore recalled telling the Port Authority several years ago. “We said, ‘Wouldn’t it be nice if we had an area where people could sit and reflect?’ ”

    To underscore the authority’s nod to its long-suffering neighbors, Mr. Foye and Steven Plate, the director of World Trade Center construction, were joined in the speech-free tree-planting ceremony by Catherine McVay Hughes, the chairwoman of Community Board 1 in Lower Manhattan.

    When they arrived, two serviceberry trees and a honey locust were already sitting in small pits at the southwest corner of the rooftop park. The officials had only to toss a few shovels full of lightweight manufactured soil — compost, sand, loam and water-absorbent aggregates — into the tree pits. Then they were done.



    Mr. Plate said he hoped the park would be open early next year. It is to have 54 trees. The honey locusts are for shade. In February and March, two kinds of witch hazel will flower in yellow and orange, followed in April by the serviceberry’s white and in May and June by the pink of a hybrid dogwood that has been bred for resistance to anthracnose fungal disease.

    Liberty Park will offer a pedestrian route between the financial district and Battery Park City, over the abutting Liberty Street bridge. Between two high-traffic walkways, however, planting beds and boxwood hedgerows will form small wells and islands that are intended as oases of calm.

    “We see this very much as a neighborhood park,” said Andrew Lavallee, a landscape architect in the Downtown Streetscape Partnership, a unit of Aecom, which designed the park for the Port Authority.

    Though Liberty Park is 25 feet off the ground, disabled residents and those with strollers can reach it by ramps, Ms. Hughes noted.

    Another landscaped public space, the northeast corner of the National September 11 Memorial plaza, will open next month, Erica Dumas, a spokeswoman for the Port Authority, said.

    Ms. Moore, meanwhile, sounded grateful but not optimistic. “Any greenery we can get, I’m thankful for,” she said. “But as soon as the park opens, the Greek church will go into construction and we’ll start all over again.”

    2015 The New York Times Company

  9. #504
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The High Line need not feel concerned about competition .



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/0...ike_a_park.php

  10. #505
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    I feel sorry for them as far as the construction is concerned, it seems never ending. Now, thousands of tourist 365.

  11. #506

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    The earthcam barely shows that they've begun adding the new segment of the South Bridge to connect it to Liberty Park. 3WTC now obstructs. Any ground photos?

  12. #507

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    Quote Originally Posted by BStyles View Post
    The earthcam barely shows that they've begun adding the new segment of the South Bridge to connect it to Liberty Park. 3WTC now obstructs. Any ground photos?
    I second this request...

  13. #508

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    Went over to the bridge the other day. The new segment lines up with the old one almost seamlessly, and they've shifted the weight distribution from the curbside pylon to the median.






  14. #509

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    If I'm not mistaken, the South Bridge is the last remaining, still-in-use part of the old WTC complex. It somehow survived the falling towers (for the most part). It is the last reminder of the pre-9/11 area. I am glad it was retained and reused.

  15. #510

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    Views of the rooftop park.
    Last edited by asg; May 5th, 2016 at 11:00 PM.

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