Page 19 of 22 FirstFirst ... 91516171819202122 LastLast
Results 271 to 285 of 325

Thread: North Korea

  1. #271

    Default

    Why doesn't the US government step in and take action? Or has it lost its will to confront evil from wherever it comes? Now is not the time to show weakness.

  2. #272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    Incredible that the North Koreans have the power to infiltrate a fortune 500 company at will and destroy all of their credibility and hold all their intellectual property hostage.

    What does that say about everyone else's computer systems? I wouldn't be surprised if they have people working inside Microsoft / Adobe / Oracle / Cisco etc... planting backdoors
    I don't believe North Korea did this, they may be involved but certainly are not alone.

    This type of hack was pretty specific to Sony it has been discovered that they had an extremely lax security system and did not have many of the most basic and rudimentary security practices in place. There is no way anyone should be able to sneak terabytes of data from a system network without all types of warning bells going off, partially this is Sony's fault.

  3. #273

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    Why doesn't the US government step in and take action? Or has it lost its will to confront evil from wherever it comes? Now is not the time to show weakness.
    Though its being publicly being blamed on North Korea, there actually is little real evidence beyond speculation.

  4. #274

    Default

    Notwithstanding Sony's stunning lack of diligence on data security, I would be shocked if North Korea were not behind this. Still, I am not quite sure I understand what recourse the US has or the actions Mr. Wedford is recommending we take.

  5. #275

    Default

    Here's a good article that explains the details.

    First off, we have to say that attribution in breaches is difficult. Assertions about who is behind any attack should be treated with a hefty dose of skepticism. Skilled hackers use proxy machines and false IP addresses to cover their tracks or plant false clues inside their malware to throw investigators off their trail. When hackers are identified and apprehended, itís generally because theyíve made mistakes or because a cohort got arrested and turned informant.

    Distinguishing between all of these can be impossible unless youíre an intelligence agency like the NSA, with vast reach into computers around the world, and can uncover evidence about attribution in ways that law enforcement agents legally cannot.

    Sony and the FBI have announced that theyíve found no evidence so far to tie North Korea to the attack. New reports, however, indicate that intelligence officials who are not permitted to speak on the record have concluded that the North Koreans are behind the hack. But they have provided no evidence to support this and without knowing even what agency the officials belong to, itís difficult to know what to make of the claim. And we should point out that intelligence agencies and government officials have jumped to hasty conclusions or misled the public in the past because it was politically expedient.

    In their initial public statement, whoever hacked Sony made no mention of North Korea or the film. And in an email sent to Sony by the hackers, found in documents they leaked, there is also no mention of North Korea or the film. The email was sent to Sony executives on Nov. 21, a few days before the hack went public. Addressed to Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton, Chairwoman Amy Pascal and other executives, it appears to be an attempt at extortion, not an expression of political outrage or a threat of war.

    Despite all of this, media outlets wonít let the North Korea narrative go and donít seem to want to consider other options. If thereís anything years of Law and Order reruns should tell us, itís that focusing on a single suspect can lead to exclusionary bias where clues that contradict the favored theory get ignored.


    The Evidence That North Korea Hacked Sony Is Flimsy

  6. #276

    Default

    How? Do we want to spin up the (still technically continuing) Korean War? I sure the South Koreans will be happy to have Seoul shelled over a hacking case.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    Why doesn't the US government step in and take action? Or has it lost its will to confront evil from wherever it comes? Now is not the time to show weakness.

  7. #277

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    How? Do we want to spin up the (still technically continuing) Korean War? I sure the South Koreans will be happy to have Seoul shelled over a hacking case.
    I wasn't suggesting any military action but a determined effort by government to find who is responsible and then take them down, in an IT sense of course.
    I was reading today that Iran, China and Russia have armies of hackers whose sole job is to find ways of breaking into the West's computer systems, at a government/large corporation level as well as the many utility companies out there, in fact it's the latter that could bring a country to its knees.

  8. #278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    I was reading today that Iran, China and Russia have armies of hackers whose sole job is to find ways of breaking into the West's computer systems, at a government/large corporation level as well as the many utility companies out there, in fact it's the latter that could bring a country to its knees.
    Wouldn't it be easier to argue that it was the US federal government (and not the North Korean government) that hacked Sony?

  9. #279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EastMillinocket View Post
    Wouldn't it be easier to argue that it was the US federal government (and not the North Korean government) that hacked Sony?
    The motive being ......?

  10. #280

    Default

    I don't know - to frame the Koreans? Anyway, you're the contrails guy, so I will leave it to you to formulate the conspiracy theory.

  11. #281

    Default

    The FBI have confirmed that it was North Korea.

  12. #282

    Default

    I don't doubt it was. Again, what would you have us do?

    The real coward here is Sony who totally caved. Shame on them.

  13. #283

    Default

    I completely agree, Ed. On the other hand, this is probably the most amazing publicity "The Interview"'s director and producers could have dreamt of. The film has gotten poor reviews, but now that it has been sabotaged by the DPRK, censored by Sony and insinuated into an international confrontation by Obama, it is a must see. It won't stay hid for long, I predict.



    19 December 2014 Last updated at 22:53

    Sony hack: Obama vows response as FBI blames North Korea


    President Barack Obama has vowed a US response after North Korea's alleged cyber-attack on Sony Pictures.


    The US leader also said the studio "made a mistake" in cancelling the Christmas release of The Interview, a satire depicting the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
    Sony said it still planned to release the film "on a different platform".

    On Friday US authorities linked North Korea to the hack, which saw sensitive studio information publicly released.

    Sony said it cancelled the planned Christmas release of the film after a majority of cinemas refused to show it following anonymous threats.

    "We will respond," Mr Obama told reporters on Friday, declining to offer specifics. "We will respond proportionately and in a space, time and manner that we choose."

    He added: "We cannot have a society in which some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship in the United States."

    The US leader said it was important to protect both public and private cyber-systems from attack which could have significant economic and social impacts.

    Mr Obama also noted he believed Sony Pictures was mistaken in failing to go ahead with the release.

    "Americans cannot change their patterns of behaviour due to the possibility of a terrorist attack," he said. "That's not who we are, that's not what America is about."

    Analysis: Dave Lee, BBC technology reporter


    The FBI say it spotted distinct similarities between the type of malware used in the Sony Pictures attack and code used to attack South Korea last year.

    Suspicious, yes, but well short of being a smoking gun. When any malware is discovered, it is shared around many experts for analysis - any attacker could simply reversion the code for their own use, like a cover version of a song.

    But there's another, better clue: IP addresses - locations, essentially - known to be part of "North Korean infrastructure" formed part of the malware too.

    This suggests the attack may have been controlled by people who have acted for North Korea in the past.

    What is the FBI evidence?


    Sony Pictures chief executive and chairman Michael Lynton later told CNN it had not made an error in pulling the film.

    He said the president, press and public were mistaken about the withdrawal, saying the decision had only been taken after major chains had refused to screen it.

    He said: "We have not caved, we have not given in, we have persevered and we have not backed down."

    A Sony statement on Friday said that the firm was "actively surveying alternatives to enable us to release the movie on a different platform".

    "It is still our hope that anyone who wants to see this movie will get the opportunity to do so," the statement said.

    Earlier on Friday, the US Federal Bureau of Investigation officially tied North Korea to the cyber-attack, linking the country to malware used in the incident.

    Hackers had earlier issued a warning referring to the 11 September 2001 terror attacks, saying "the world will be full of fear" if the film was screened.

    The movie features James Franco and Seth Rogen as two journalists who are granted an audience with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

    The CIA then enlists the pair to assassinate him. The film was due to have been released over Christmas.

    The film's cancelled release drew criticism in Hollywood, with some calling it an attack on the freedom of expression.

    Actor George Clooney told the trade website Deadline on Thursday the film should be released online, saying Hollywood shouldn't be threatened by North Korea.

    In November, a cyber-attack crippled computers at Sony and led to upcoming films and workers' personal data being leaked online.

    The hackers also released salary details and social security numbers for thousands of Sony employees - including celebrities.

    North Korea earlier this month denied involvement in the hack - but praised the attack itself as a "righteous deed".

    An article on North Korea's state-run KCNA news agency, quoting the country's top military body, said suggestions that Pyongyang was behind the attack were "wild rumour".

    However, it warned the US that "there are a great number of supporters and sympathisers" of North Korea "all over the world" who may have carried out the attack.

    In the article, Sony Pictures was accused of "abetting a terrorist act" and "hurting the dignity of the supreme leadership" of North Korea by producing the movie.


    BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.
    BBCDOTCOM analytics template:client-side journalismVariant: true ipIsAdvertiseCombined: true adsEnabled: false flagpole: ON BBCCOM analytics client-side

  14. #284

    Default

    This amounts to two thumbs up from Siskel and Ebert:

    Pascal and other Sony film executives asked Rogen to remove some of the gore from the the scene in which Kim dies in a slow-motion fireball. The aim of the cuts was to emphasize the comedic nature of the film and depict the scene in a more cartoonish light.
    “In shot #337 there is no face melting, less fire in the hair, fewer embers on the face, and the head explosion has been considerably obscured by the fire, as well as darkened to look less like flesh,” Pascal wrote to Hirai on Sept. 28. “We arrived at this shot (#337) after much cajoling and resistance from the filmmakers.”

    The movie has drawn scorn from North Korean officials, who called it an “act of war” and in June promised to “mercilessly destroy” anyone who had a hand in making it.

  15. #285
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    Obama becomes 3lit3 hax0r:

    "CloudFlare, an Internet company based in San Francisco, confirmed Monday that North Korea’s Internet access was “toast.”"

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/23/wo...collapses.html

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software