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Thread: North Korea

  1. #16
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Bink, you were being reactionary, just admit it and move on.

    There is no such thing as a precision shotgun, at least, not with buckshot. You can hit a target within a dozen feet from thousands of miles away, but that Nuke will kill tens to hundreds of thousands immediately, throw up nuclear debris that will blow SOMEWHERE, and leave a nch of really happy people ready to come to an agreement with everyone

    You are flame baiting and you know it.

  2. #17

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    I'm serious Ninja, North Korea has got to be dealt with rather than pussy-footing around pretending there's no problem. They've threatened South Korea, Japan, and God knows who else and one day these loonies will unleash their nuclear weaponry upon unsuspecting countries killing millions, so we wait til then? The answer is yes if you're some wishy-washy liberal who, to quote Norman Bates, "wouldn't hurt a fly". I say let's confront reality and deal with the problem before it deals with us. I know it's difficult for some liberals to accept this fact but sometimes you just have to make some harsh decisions that will result in the deaths of the few to protect the lives of the many and remove an implacable ruthless foe.

  3. #18
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    "Deaths of a few" ???

    If you are going to "confront reality" then that includes the acknowledgement that the use of nuclear weapons involves calculating the risk due to the fallout cloud of radiation. Those calculations, from what is posted above, seem to be inadequate or faulty or both. A nuke strike on NK would result in a cloud of killing radiation that would move east, over both South Korea and Japan. Tens of thousands of citizens in those two countries, if not more, would likely be poisoned or die. Not to mention the hundreds of thousands in the NK who would be vaporized. And once the NK guys see our weapons flying through the air aimed at them, then what reason would they have not to lob any and all of their weapons towards China, SK, Japan, Russia? Any person, liberal or conservative or whatever, should be able to understand that.

    Maybe: Playing too many video games?

  4. #19

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    This is the first time in a while that I've been somewhat concerned about Korea.

    I've been of the opinion that the Iran stuff was sabre-rattling on both sides. The Iranian government is rational, and their country is somewhat open. North Korea, on the other hand, seems to be the opposite of rational and is completely closed off.

    Hopefully it'll cool down.

  5. #20

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    at binky, I am not even sure this is worth commenting on (so of course I will) The potential harm from radioactive fall-out is only the begining of the problem. What happens if China decides they are not able to sit idly by and watch North Korea be blown to oblivion. They have lots of interesing options including flooding the market with our debt, driving up our deficit finance costs and sending us into an ecomomic tailspin (although given the state of the euro, the chinese may decide they lack alternative monetary control options) Worst case, they execute a counter strike against the south and drag us into a third world war.

    Entangled military alliances coupled with significant military capability constituted the indirect cause of WW1. It is not unreasonable to think the same scenerio will lead to WW3.

  6. #21
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Along with the China plan for economic retaliation I understand that factories over there are going to make a killing off of BB's idea:


  7. #22

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    So Ninja, lofter1, & eddhead, if we can't use the nukes to destroy our enemies, why has the US spent $Billions building & maintaining an arsenal of nuclear weapons? What's the point?

  8. #23

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The point is that they scare the sh!t out of the other side.

    Mutually Assured Destruction

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Things are heating up ...

    South Korea Begins Large-Scale Military Exercises

    THE HUFFINGTON POST
    By KELLY OLSEN
    May 27, 2010 - 4:04 PM

    SEOUL, South Korea Military tension on the Korean peninsula rose Thursday after North Korea threatened to attack any South Korean ships entering its waters and Seoul held anti-submarine drills in response to the March sinking of a navy vessel blamed on Pyongyang.

    Separately, the chief U.S. military commander in South Korea criticized the North over the sinking of the South Korean warship Cheonan in which 46 sailors died, telling the communist country to stop its aggressive actions.

    North Korean reaction was swift. The military declared it would scrap accords with the South designed to prevent armed clashes at their maritime border, including the cutting of a military hot line, and warned of "prompt physical strikes" if any South Korean ships enter what the North says are its waters in a disputed area off the west coast of the peninsula.

    A multinational team of investigators said May 20 that a North Korean torpedo sank the 1,200-ton ship. Seoul announced punitive measures, including slashing trade and resuming anti-Pyongyang propaganda over radio and loudspeakers aimed at the North. North Korea has denied attacking the ship, which sank near disputed western waters where the Koreas have fought three bloody sea battles since 1999.

    "The facts and evidence laid out by the joint international investigation team are very compelling. That is why I have asked the Security Council to fulfill their responsibility to keep peace and stability ... to take the necessary measures, keeping in mind the gravity of this situation," U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said as he opened a conference in Brazil meant to help find solutions to global conflicts.

    Inter-Korean political and economic ties have been steadily deteriorating since the February 2008 inauguration of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who vowed a tougher line on the North and its nuclear program. The sinking of the Cheonan has returned military tensions and the prospect of armed conflict to the forefront.

    Off the west coast, 10 South Korean warships, including a 3,500-ton destroyer, fired artillery and other guns and dropped anti-submarine bombs during a one-day exercise to boost readiness, the navy said.

    South Korea also is planning two major military drills with the U.S. by July in a display of force intended to deter aggression by North Korea, according to South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff.

    Gen. Walter Sharp, chief of the 28,500 U.S. troops in South Korea, said the United States, South Korea and other members of the U.N. Command "call on North Korea to cease all acts of provocation and to live up with the terms of past agreements, including the armistice agreement."

    The U.S. fought on the South Korean side during the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty. North Korea has long demanded a permanent peace agreement.

    The prospect of another eruption of serious fighting has been constant on the Korean peninsula since the war ended. But it had been largely out of focus in the past decade as North and South Korea took steps to end enmity and distrust, such as launching joint economic projects and holding two summits.

    The sinking of the warship, however, clearly caught South Korea which has a far more modern and advanced military than its impoverished rival off guard.

    "I think one of the big conclusions that we can draw from this is that, in fact, military readiness in the West Sea had become very lax," said Carl Baker, an expert on Korean military relations at the Pacific Forum CSIS think tank in Honolulu, calling it nothing short of an "indictment" of Seoul's preparedness.

    South Korean and U.S. militaries are taking pains to warn the North that such an embarrassment will not happen again.

    South Korean media reported Thursday that the U.S.-South Korean combined forces command led by Sharp raised its surveillance level, called Watch Condition, by a step from level 3 to level 2. Level 1 is the highest.


    The increased alert level means U.S. spy satellites and U-2 spy planes will intensify their reconnaissance of North Korea, the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said, citing an unidentified South Korean official.

    The South Korean and U.S. militaries would not confirm any changes to the alert level. It would be the first change since North Korea carried out a nuclear test in May 2009, a South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff officer said on condition of anonymity, citing department policy.

    A South Korean Defense Ministry official said Seoul will "resolutely" deal with the North's measures announced Thursday, but did not elaborate. He spoke on condition of anonymity, citing department policy. South Korea's military said there were no signs of unusual activity by North Korean troops.

    Despite the tensions, most analysts feel the prospect of war remains remote because North Korea knows what's at stake.

    "I don't think they're really interested in going to war," said Daniel Pinkston, a Seoul-based analyst for the International Crisis Group think tank. "Because if it's all-out war, then I'm convinced it would mean the absolute destruction" of North Korea. "And their country would cease to exist."

    Thousands of South Korean veterans of the Korean and Vietnam wars rallied Thursday in Seoul, beating a life-sized rubber likeness of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il with wooden sticks and stabbing it with knives. "Dialogue won't work with these North Korean devils," said Mo Hyo-sang, an 81-year-old Korean War veteran.

    In Moscow, the Kremlin said President Dmitry Medvedev sent a group of experts to Seoul to study the findings of the investigation into the ship disaster.

    "Medvedev considers it a matter of principle to establish the reason for the sinking of the ship," it said.

    ___

    Associated Press writers Hyung-jin Kim and Sangwon Yoon in Seoul, David Nowak in Moscow and Marco Sibaja in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this report.

    Copyright 2010 HuffingtonPost.com, Inc.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    The point is that they scare the sh!t out of the other side.
    They don't appear to worry Kim Jong-il.

  12. #27

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    In spite of all the fools and idiots that occupy government positions throughout the world, it's comforting that some of us don't have any say in the release of nuclear weapons.

  13. #28

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    Nuclear weapons should never be used. Even in the event that a rogue nation hits one of us with a nuke it is still not justified to retaliate with one. In this case however I do believe that military action should be taken against N. Korea to completely incapacitate them. This is not a little thing that can be diplomatically brushed under the rug. If a US ship was sunk do you think there would be any diplomacy? No.

  14. #29

  15. #30

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    The fact that China is finally behaving ambivalently toward the DPRK has to be a good sign. No one (except maybe Binky :-)) wants a war with North Korea, but that is not really the problem here: the regime has been teetering near collapse since the mid-90s and, in its desperation to keep rising discontent among its populace in check, it has taken to increasingly dangerous and aggressive military policies and tactics. First the nukes, then the withdrawl from the armistice in May, 2009, and most recently in the sinking of the South Korean ship.

    Seems bizarre, but Chinese diplomacy probably offers the best chance for a peaceful resolution.

    China faces pressure to act over North Korea at summit

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