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Thread: North Korea

  1. #61
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    Leaving North Korea, Rodman Calls Kims ‘Great Leaders’



    “He’s proud, his country likes him — not like him, love him, love him,” Rodman said of Kim Jong-un. “Guess what, I love him. The guy’s really awesome.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2013...ea-rodman.html


    isn't that technically some sort of treason?

  2. #62

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    Maybe not.

    Dennis Rodman @dennisrodman

    Maybe I'll run into the Gangnam Style dude while I'm here @psy_oppa #WORMinNorthKorea
    2:06 PM - 26 Feb 13


    PSY @psy_oppa

    @dennisrodman I'm from #SOUTH man!!! kk
    3:23 AM - 27 Feb 13

  3. #63
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Maybe he is just an Idiot.....


    A lonely Idiot.

  4. #64

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    Sounds right to me.

  5. #65

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    So Worm, how do you like him now?

    March 7, 2013

    New Sanctions Imposed on North Korea as it Warns of Pre-emptive Nuclear Attack


    By RICK GLADSTONE and CHOE SANG-HUN

    The United Nations Security Council approved a new regimen of sanctions on Thursday against North Korea for its underground nuclear test last month, imposing penalties on North Korean banking, travel and trade in a unanimous vote that reflected the country’s increased international isolation.

    The resolution, which was drafted by the United States and China, was passed in a speedy vote hours after North Korea threatened for the first time to launch a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the United States and South Korea.

    “The strength, breadth and severity of these sanctions will raise the cost to North Korea of its illicit nuclear program,” the United States ambassador to the United Nations, Susan E. Rice, told reporters after the vote. “Taken together, these sanctions will bite and bite hard.”

    Li Baodong, the ambassador from China, which lent its support to the new sanctions to the anger of the North Korean government, told reporters the resolution was aimed at the long-term goal of denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula.

    “This resolution is a very important step,” he told reporters.

    Calling such sanctions “an act of war,” the North has sharply escalated its threats against the United States and its allies in the last few days, declaring the 1953 armistice that stopped the Korean War null and void and threatening to turn Washington and Seoul into “a sea in flames” with “lighter and smaller nukes.”

    The combative country had often warned that it had the right to launch pre-emptive military strikes against the United States, which it claimed was preparing to start a war on the Korean Peninsula. On Thursday, it ratcheted up its hostile language by talking about pre-emptive nuclear strikes for the first time, citing the continuing joint American-South Korean military exercises as a proof that the United States and its allies were preparing for “a nuclear war aimed to mount a pre-emptive strike” on North Korea.

    “Now that the U.S. is set to light a fuse for a nuclear war, the revolutionary armed forces of the DPRK will exercise the right to a pre-emptive nuclear attack to destroy the strongholds of the aggressors and to defend the supreme interests of the country,” a spokesman of the North Korean Foreign Ministry said in a Korean-language statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency. He used the acronym for his country’s official name, Democratic People’s republic of Korea.

    The spokesman said that North Korea was no longer bound by the 1953 armistice ending the Korean War — and its military was free to “take military actions for self-defense against any target any moment” — starting from Monday, when it declared the cease-fire was terminated.

    The resolution the United Nations adopted to impose more sanctions against the North “will compel the DPRK to take at an earlier date more powerful second and third countermeasures as it had declared,” the spokesman added, without elaborating.

    In the past, whenever the United Nations considered more sanctions, North Korea’s typically strident rhetoric had grown harsher with threats of war. The threats were just that, and analysts said the message was meant as much for its home population, to whom they said the young leader Kim Jong-un sought to inspire a sense of crisis, as it was meant to unsettle the region to force Washington to engage it with concessions.

    Photos filed by news agencies from the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, and carried in South Korean media on Thursday showed buses covered with military camouflage and university students rushing out of their classroom building in military uniforms in a military exercise.

    Few analysts believed that North Korea would launch a military attack at the United States, a decision that would be suicidal for the regime. But officials in Seoul feared that North Korea might attempt an armed skirmish to test the military resolve of Park Geun-hye, South Korea’s first female president, who took office less than two weeks ago.

    On Wednesday, in an uncharacteristically blunt response to North Korea’s threat, a South Korean Army general called a news conference and warned that if provoked, South Korea would strike back at the top North Korean military leadership. The two Koreas’ front-line units exchanged artillery fire after North Korea launched a barrage against a South Korean border island in 2010.

    In the same year, 46 South Korean sailors were killed when their navy corvette sank in an explosion the South blamed on a North Korean torpedo attack.

    With the United States standing behind it, South Korea has since vowed to strike back with a deadlier force if North Korea provokes again.

    Despite such warnings, however, South Korean officials feared that Mr. Kim, an inexperienced leader eager to build his credentials and gravitas as leader of his “military-first” country might have been emboldened by his country’s recent successful tests of a long-range rocket and nuclear device to believe that he could try an armed provocation with impunity.

    In North Korea, where pronouncements are carefully choreographed and timed, the threat on Tuesday to use “lighter and smaller nukes” was read on North Korean television by Gen. Kim Yong-chol. General Kim, the head of the North’s military intelligence, is one of the hard-liners that South Korean officials suspected was deeply involved in the 2010 attacks.

    Rick Gladstone reported from New York, and Choe Sang-hun from Seoul, South Korea.

    © 2013 The New York Times Company


    Some advice from fellow NBA alumnus Shaqille O'Neal.


  6. #66

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    Jesus. I mean, guess what. Jesus.

    Last edited by hbcat; March 8th, 2013 at 12:31 AM.

  7. #67

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    Quite a contrast in those two vids.

  8. #68

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    He's never looked so foolish -- quite an accomplishment, actually.

  9. #69

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    HAH!

    BTW - I find it promising that whereas they have been an obstacle in the past, China drafted the latest sanctions resolution. I am no expert in resolutions, but based on comments from US foreign policy sources, it seems to have some teeth. If so, it clearly more credible coming from the Chinese, and if the Obama administration worked behind the scenes to push China a bit, it is a big win for them.

    p.s. Welcome back! Long time no post!

  10. #70

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    China may have become uneasy with the rhetoric coming out of North Korea.

    The talk of tearing up the armistice and launching a nuclear strike against the US may seem like silly posturing from over here, but what about South Korea. A half-century long standoff can become a hot war overnight. If that happens, the US is in - hell, we're in already. And China is in. Japan? Russia?

    It would be a global disaster.

  11. #71

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    Wasn't it Geroge Washington that warned us about Foreign Entaglements? In today's vernacular the more appropriate concern might be Global Entanglements.

    Given the US and China are allied with oppossing countries techmically still at war with each other, I can easily see WWIII starting on the Korean penninsula.

    I absolutely believe China is not comfrotable with the rhetoric coming out of North Korea. Even a best case 'contained' war, potentially means tens or hundreds of thousands of refugees spilling over the Yalu river into eastern China. The Chinese do not want to deal with that.

  12. #72
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    For china, "War" is fine so long as it is contained. They can support NK all they want and keep them out of their hair.

    If they start lobbing nukes, that gets them in deeper, and possibly risks their own well being (fallout... literally).

    I am just wondering how long you can starve your country, blame others, and forbid different hairstyles until you get a mass oposition to your policy. Maybe not an armed insurrection, but more of a "You want this? Do it yourself" situation.

  13. #73

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    I don't think the Chinese want a war of any kind - contained or otherwise.

    For one thing, as you sort of noted, it is not at all clear that a war on the Korean penninsula CAN be contained, especially if he North has a nuclear launch capability. That is a game-changer that has to scare even the Chinese.

    For another as I mentioned above, if things go badly even in a contained situation, an unmanagable amount of NK refugees are going to end up in China creating a mess of mass proportions.

    Historically, China has backed NK's game figuring they had a measure of influence that would allow them to rein them in at any point. I am not so sure they're as comfortable with that paradimn today as they were than. Kim is literally a child, and is probably not in complete control of what is happening in the North where a gang of militarlisic nationals are probably flexing their muscles. At the very least they are likely taking advantage of his youth to exert influence on him.

    I wonder if they were surprised when China yanked hard on their leash.
    Last edited by eddhead; March 8th, 2013 at 01:09 PM.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    I am just wondering how long you can starve your country, blame others, and forbid different hairstyles until you get a mass oposition to your policy. Maybe not an armed insurrection, but more of a "You want this? Do it yourself" situation.
    Probably indefinitely at this point. Stalin shipped everyone off to the Gulag and purged every corner of dissent then sent in the secret police and enlisted an army of civilians to report their own grandmothers. NK is the same thing, except that it is vastly smaller and thus is even easier to maintain an iron grip on. It's been 60 years of repression and nobody with any sort of means to act knows anything other than living under a boot with an eye trained behind your shoulder. The only thing that can change things outside of an invasion is either a personality transplant for Kim Jong Un or for the country to be staved of resources so badly that the inner circles revolt against the dictatorship and openly court the world. China is the main problem at this point, they are the enablers.

  15. #75

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    Interesting fact. North Korea's average life expectancy is 68.00yrs. 8.5 years lower than their neighbors to the South and 4.9 years lower than the impoverished masses to the north.

    I wonder do they include all the "death-by-thinking-differently" numbers in that average?

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