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Thread: World Cup 2010

  1. #76

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  2. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by hbcat View Post
    After watching a couple of matches the vuvuzela hum fades out into a background noise,
    Audionamix Vuvuzela Remover

    If your TV sound system has an equalizer, zero-out 300hz, and increase the adjacent bands.

    -----------------------

    I thought octopi were a hockey thing.

  3. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    The level of play in this WC isn't usually high enough to make me put up with that awful sound for more than a few minutes.

    There were reports of ethnic and religious divisions within the French team. A player (Gourcuff) was said to have been bullied and excluded supposedly because he is too well-mannered, good-looking and something of a gay icon. The media were shut out, so we don't really know (the players interviewed so far have denied it).

    It's a small "national crisis" because football matters too much in Europe and the players' refusal to practice after Anelka was sent home for insulting the coach made the whole performance a debacle on more than a sports level. The country felt humiliated.
    The French were doomed from the start:
    - They were very fortunate to even get to the WC Finals group stage after the disservice of Henry and his hand (not once but twice) against the RoI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09iXr...eature=related).
    - Domenech uses astrology to pick his teams; scorpio's can't 'play' football so they aren't even called up, he is wary of leo's as defenders (ie pretty much all of the best French defenders...are leo's) because they are more likely to gamble on counter-attacks - you can't manage a team with such crazy logic.
    - French football development has been on the decline in recent years; Clairefontaine the once-prestigious French football academy (that produced the talents of Anelka, Gallas, Henry, Saha, etc...) hasn't produced anyone of significance in the past 5 years.

    Football is immensely engrained within not just European, but Africa, South and Central American societies. It is also gradually taking hold across the Middle East and Asia (when travelling through rurual Laos I ran into a local who supported Newcastle United - the same club I support). Thus because it is the worlds' only true global sport, the status of the team can play towards how countries/cities are viewed in many peoples' eyes.

  4. #79
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Ghana won against the US 2-1 and I'm happy for them.

  5. #80
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    "just simmer down over there"
    ˆ I love this...
    And use of the the royal "we"... "I'm-speaking-for-the-forum" ...is pretty good too.
    We *sigh*
    Don't sigh, just chuckle. It will be more bearable for you. You do know I was joking... having some fun right?
    Note the laughing emoticon; and this was said after you joked about your "pee" updates.
    What you said was funny and created an amusing visual...thus the suddenly colorful speech in my post about "putting us off our lunch" (you omitted that part of my post when quoting) and the royal tone of someone who would find that uncouth. It was a joking tone, as in ha-ha. Who even says "simmer down" anymore? Do you really think I couldn't eat my lunch?

    If you took it the wrong way (and your response suggests you did), meaning you think the "royal we" was meant seriously...I don't know what to say.

  6. #81
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    I would really like to see Mexico win on Sunday.


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    World Cup 2010: Mexico shed fear factor ahead of Argentina showdown

    Mexico are confident they can shake off the inhibitions of old and avenge defeat by Argentina at the same stage of the World Cup four years ago


    For Chileans who have suffered the tragic consequences of an earthquake and tsunami recently, the gift of something to cherish was there to be seized. A crowd of 50,000 descended upon Santiago's main thoroughfare on Friday night to honour Chile's progress in the World Cup.

    They were the last of what has been a clean sweep of South American teams, with all five contenders from the Conmebol region reaching the last 16 of the tournament with barely a hiccup. Argentina won their group with maximum points. Brazil, Uruguay and Paraguay topped theirs without losing a game. Chile won plenty of friends as they went for the jugular, only to end up behind Spain on goal difference. Unlike their European cousins, there have been no shambolic exits, no shamed faces, no bad-tempered uprisings and no apologies to report. Even Diego Maradona has been as sweet as pie.

    Considering not a single South American side made it as far as the semi-finals at Germany 2006 (which comprised an all European quartet) this new show of dominance has puffed up the chests of those involved.

    The iconic Uruguayan schemer Enzo Francescoli thinks the difference is the dual experience South American players have of top-level football on their own continent during a gruelling qualification campaign allied to regular club football in Europe. "The players are used to a different standard of football, with different tactical movements and different marking styles. South American football is another thing altogether," he reckons.

    If you include the progress of Mexico and the USA, teams from the Americas make up almost half of the last 16. Unbridled confidence is a common theme. So too is a commitment to go for it. Although Brazil might not yet be winning as many marks for aesthetic impression as the world has come to expect, it has been refreshing to see Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Mexico and Argentina take the field with the attacking vibrancy and fluency that comes with a three-pronged attack.

    Even in their undiluted misery back home in France and Italy, it would take a footballing spoilsport of the highest order not to want to cast an eye over the rendezvous between Argentina and Mexico at Soccer City in Johannesburg this evening.
    History may teach Mexicans not to be overly optimistic, but the health of their football is such they do wonder when they can unlock their vast potential. Their football industry is one of the highest ranked in the world in terms of revenue and income. Outside Europe, support for the domestic league is surpassed only by that of Brazil. They have always been importers of talent and now they are exporting, too. It has a thriving TV business and acts as the gateway for broadcasts to South and North America.

    Around 20,000 Mexicans travelled to South Africa, despite the cost of most tours (an average of $13,000 – £8,640) being well beyond the reach of all but the very rich. Javier Aguirre's team, which fuses the enthusiasm of youthful strikers such as Carlos Vela and Giovani dos Santos with the experience of the trio of captains in Rafael Márquez, Gerardo Torrado and Cuauhtémoc Blanco, are desperate to get one over Argentina. Torrado has urged his team-mates to "play to the death".

    Márquez insists they have the qualities to do so. "They are a good team, but we also can play a bit and have bags of talent. We have to plug into that," said the Barcelona defender. That said, they do know they have to improve on a subdued display against Uruguay in their last group game. As Dos Santos admitted: "We've got a lot of things to work on. It's vital for us to set the record straight as a team from now on." There is a hint of revenge involved, too.

    At this stage four years ago, Mexico locked horns with Argentina in what was a thoroughly engrossing, but ultimately heartbreaking, footballing dance. A steaming hot evening in Leipzig provided the setting and Mexico did an expert job in matching Argentina for more than 90 minutes as they astutely stood up to the aristocrats pound for pound, tackle for tackle, chance for chance. It took a thunderbolt from Maxi Rodríguez in extra-time to foil them. Incidentally, the youngest player Argentina have picked at a World Cup should also have been awarded a late goal (it was wrongly ruled out by the referee). The kid was Lionel Messi.

    It was a particularly emotional situation for Mexico's coach at the time, Ricardo La Volpe, who happened to be Argentinian and spectacularly volatile. He spent most of the World Cup at Mexico's camp eating doughnuts and smoking under a roped-off parasol. "Get out of my face! You know nothing," he snapped at reporters. "Don't break my balls, you ****ing idiots."

    Life is considerably calmer, and more focused, under the current coach Aguirre – the fifth man to take charge of Mexico since then. The defender Francisco Rodríguez explains how the squad have settled into a more comfortable rhythm. "The mindset has changed a lot, especially as far as the younger players are concerned. Now I see with my own eyes that Mexican players really want to win when they play for the national team. Mexican footballers have lost that fear that they used to have, the fear of winning and of trying new experiences abroad."

    Eight of the usual starting XI earn their living abroad. "It's helped Mexican football to grow considerably," adds Rodríguez. "Bit by bit, we're raising the level, not just in football, but in the country as a whole as well. We obviously talked a lot before the World Cup and what we all agreed on is that we wanted to make history."

    To do so they must overcome the mighty obstacle of Argentina. Superstitious Mexicans think that the year augurs well: 2010 is the bicentenary of Independence and the centenary of the Revolution. For something momentous to happen now feels inevitable.

    The motto Mexico chose to have sprawled all over their official team bus during their stay in South Africa aims miles further than they have ever before managed at a World Cup. "¡Es tiempo de un nuevo campeón!" is the message. It is time for a new champion.

  7. #82

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    This just in: post #80 wins the World (Wide Web) Cup in the category, "backpeddling".

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    More hot air:

    World Cup 2010: Organisers will not ban vuvuzelas

    World Cup organisers say they will not ban vuvuzelas from stadiums in South Africa, despite numerous complaints.

    The sound of the plastic horn has been likened to the drone of a thousand bees or a herd of stampeding elephants. Portugal winger Cristiano Ronaldo says the noise affects player concentration, while some fans watching on television claim they cannot hear the commentary. But a World Cup spokesman insisted vuvuzelas are "ingrained in the history of South Africa" and will remain.

    Rich Mkhondo also said vuvuzelas had worldwide appeal. "Let us not make this a South Africa instrument alone," he said. "A vuvuzela is now an international instrument. People buy them and stuff them in their suitcase to go home.
    "Only a minority are against vuvuzelas. You either love them or hate. We in South Africa love them."

    England defender Jamie Carragher said the noise did not bother him when he came on as a half-time substitute during the 1-1 draw with the United States and he said he had already bought two to take home to his children in Liverpool.

    I have always said that Africa has a different rhythm, a different sound "When I came on I didn't notice it too much. I think you notice it more when you are watching on TV," he said. "But my kids have been on the phone and asked for two so I'll have to take two home for them. I've got two in my bag already. "Anyone who watches me play at Anfield will know that I am louder than the vuvuzelas!"

    Fifa president Sepp Blatter also weighed into the debate and believes vuvuzelas are part and parcel of football in South Africa."I have always said that Africa has a different rhythm, a different sound," he commented on social networking site Twitter.
    "I don't see banning the music traditions of fans in their own country. Would you want to see a ban on the fan traditions in your country?"

    A recent survey found that the sound emitted by a vuvuzela was the equivalent to 127 decibels - louder than a drum's 122 decibels or a referee's whistle at 121.8 decibels.

    Portugal star Ronaldo is the latest World Cup star to voice unease about the instrument. "It is difficult for anyone on the pitch to concentrate," said the Real Madrid forward. "A lot of players don't like them but they are going to have to get used to them."

    France captain Patrice Evra blamed the noise generated by the vuvuzelas for his side's poor showing in their opening group game against Uruguay, which finished goalless.
    He added: "We can't sleep at night because of the vuvuzelas. People start playing them from 6am. "We can't hear one another out on the pitch because of them."

    Backing for the under-fire vuvuzela has come from the England Supporters' Band, which has not missed an England game - home or away - since 1996. Trumpeter John Hemmingham, who is leading an eight-man team in South Africa, said the plastic instruments were part of the local culture and should not be banned from stadiums.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/foot...10/8737455.stm

  8. #83

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    In light of all the complaints the organizers should have banned them themselves, to be good hosts. It's not a sacred local "music tradition."

    Domenech uses astrology to pick his teams; scorpio's can't 'play' football so they aren't even called up, he is wary of leo's as defenders (ie pretty much all of the best French defenders...are leo's) because they are more likely to gamble on counter-attacks - you can't manage a team with such crazy logic.
    That was a rumor, not sure I buy it. But there's no doubt he was a mediocre coach.

  9. #84
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Good to see that both Midtown Guy and Fabrizio have made it through to the next round, and that their on-going rivalry will continue

  10. #85

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    Does this count as a Godwin? --


  11. #86

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    Lofter: I lost long ago. There is no way I can beat: "Do you really think I couldn't eat my lunch?".

  12. #87
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    But we're only at the quarterfinals. Don't give up yet. Try the vuvuzela. Now that the US is out folks over here need something to keep our interest going.

  13. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Now that the US is out folks over here need something to keep our interest going.
    Here is something 'interesting' to keep our interest: Former FIFA ref calls - 'foul play' on biased soccer officials. I am in general agreement with the claim: too many excuses are being given (by officials) for many (many) blatantly bad calls. The refusal of the goal in the US/Slovenia game was just more of the same sort of BS I have been witnessing in World Cup games for years now.

    BTW, the second goal for the UK today was improperly disallowed: pure BS - how can this kind of nonsense take place in the face of a millions of viewers. FIFA SUCKS. A missive from a disgruntled loser? Perhaps!

    June 19, 2010
    The reality of international soccer - anti-American bias
    Ben Voth
    International soccer is an artistic expression painted by referees on a canvas of grass with athletes as brushes.

    Neither current public comments of frustration or the reactions of American players sufficiently explains how international referees create and render the game of international "soccer." The referees do not specify any foul when they are called. So "offsides" or "tripping" are never named when they are called by a referee. The referees do not have to provide any clarification apart from where the kick shall proceed from as it re-enters play.

    Referees can decide when the game ends. Referees can issue yellow cards and red cards on the basis of pure discretion. Linesmen do not over rule or have independent authority and can be over ruled or ignored on any flag they offer.

    It is not a coincidence that the Germans were called so poorly in their recent match. Germany is the European hegemon in soccer and they will be destroyed if at all possible from the artistic perspective of the international referee. Germany's recent bailout of Greece and its increasingly dominant financial position earns the wrath of grudge-driven referees from a global community that largely views itself as unfairly aggrieved by such powers.

    Imagine for a moment what a game involving Israelis would be like. International soccer is always essentially a statement by international referees in reference to their subjective political sentiments. As in so many other sports, many teams would simply refuse to play-- in deference to their powerfully held anti-semitic views. Such attitudes are far more normative to the general practice of international soccer than Americans tend to imagine.

    I was a FIFA (International Federation of Association Football) certified referee. I have refereed hundreds of games and love the sport. Nonetheless, the collision of international politics and sportsmanship is powerful and it leaves far more professional wreckage on the field of play than the American public used to 'instant replay' and the general norms of fair play would expect.

    I laughed recently when I read a Los Angeles sportswriter suggesting America forfeit our games so the world won't feel so bad about our general hegemony:

    "I love the World Cup. And I love America - it's my hometown! But I would not love to see America win the World Cup.

    Frankly, we don't need another feather in our already overstuffed cap. And considering soccer is the world's game - and most of the world is at odds with America at any given moment - I think it might be a nice idea for Uncle Sam, in an effort to promote world harmony, to lie down in South Africa."

    --What gullible American nonsense! Zero games are played outside the US where the referees are not actively working to undermine, embarrass, and hinder the American team.

    Little was said in the Slovenian game about the ball hitting an American player in the face and the referee giving a yellow card disqualifying him from the next game!? Apparently the referee was alarmed that the ball nearly bounced off his face and into the Slovenian goal.

    Moreover, the international referees license violence against American players which is also quite visceral because of the nature of international politics and the global public euphoria at ‘beating the Americans.' When Mexican fans recently chanted "Osama" while hosting the US team, they also treated American fans braving the scene to peltings with batteries. Much like the Israelis, Americans are not viewed as fully moral equals to other nations in the minds of soccer's ruling authorities.

    Soccer remains a valuable international tool for fostering dialogue. Despite this, Americans would do well to understand the widely disseminated contempt toward them that makes the subjective reign of soccer referees a wildly artistic endeavor designed to communicate the proper subjective political ends. For the majority of international referees, it is unimaginable that Americans would be worthy of equal and fair consideration on the playing field given their conduct in the global sphere. Soccer is for these referees an opportunity to make a lifetime artistic achievement in expressing that widely held pathological sentiment. The Slovenia game was but one more masterpiece in a massive global soccer art gallery sanctioned and built by FIFA.



    Ben Voth is the chair of Communication and director of Debate at Southern Methodist University and a former FIFA-approved soccer referee.
    Last edited by infoshare; June 27th, 2010 at 12:09 PM.

  14. #89
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    But we're only at the quarterfinals. Don't give up yet. Try the vuvuzela. Now that the US is out folks over here need something to keep our interest going.
    Well Lofter, clearly he's already got *sigh*ing down pat...now it'll just be learning how to push all that hot air through a different kind of blow hole.
    ---


    fabrizio said, "This just in: post #80 wins the World (Wide Web) Cup in the category, 'backpeddling'."

    ^ and that post wins the booby prize for a good try.
    ---

  15. #90
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    tonight:

    World Cup Bet Of The Day: Argentina - Mexico

    Deja vu for both teams as our Sunday night fare is a repeat of their clash from four years ago at the same stage of the tournament. We'd gladly settle for a repeat of that one as we look ahead to our betting options.

    Argentina were the undisputed stars of the group stage comfortably emerging with nine points playing superb football along the way. Diego Maradona's critics have been forced to eat their words (for now) as La Albiceleste have found form and favour with the bookies who have them as third favourites for the trophy at 5.50 at the time of writing.

    Mexico were hit and miss in the group stage sharing the spoils with South Africa in an anxious opener. They impressed against France but that's not saying much considering how poor Les Bleus were. A loss to Uruguay followed where Mexico switched their strategy from attack to caution as they were clearly influenced by events from the France - South Africa match.

    Argentina Tips
    Fresh from his Greece rest after grabbing a hat-trick against South Korea Gonzalo Higuain is an excellent 1.95 to score during the 90 minutes and 4.0 to score first.
    Leo Messi has sparkled during the tournament and has been involved with the best of Argentina's play. There's only one thing missing from his game - a goal. He is surely going to break his duck soon and there is no better time than today when it really matters and he is 1.80 for anytime and 4.0 to score first. Messi's moment is coming mark my words.

    Mexico Tips
    Giovani dos Santos has shone for Mexico and his quick feet and artistry will cause problems for any opposition. He's already forced seven shots with three hitting the target and is well priced at 5.0 to score at anytime and 13.0 to be on the mark first. Veteran Cuauhtemoc Blanco, who scored against France, is 15.0 to score first and 5.0 for anytime. In his World Cup swansong the Mexican legend is worth keeping an eye on.

    Betting Verdict

    Since Diego Maradona took over as manager of Argentina La Albiceleste have not drawn a single game. In that 22 game run they've only failed to score twice and are on hot winning streak with seven victories on the spin. At 1.67 they are a strong and fairly safe bet to beat a side they have bested by three goal margins in their last three meetings.

    Argentina's Martin Demichelis is not a player who inspires confidence and you would have to suspect he is likely to make a mistake at some point. Mexico will be exceptionally motivated to make up for their defeat in 2006 and both teams to score is another tasty bet. It's happened in every knock out game so far.

    * Argentina to win - 1.67

    * Both teams to score - 2.20

    http://www.goal.com/en-gb/news/3095/...gentina-mexico

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