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Thread: Exhibition: "Everybody Street" Explores Street Photography - Seaport Museum

  1. #1
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Exhibition: "Everybody Street" Explores Street Photography - Seaport Museum

    "Everybody Street" by Cheryl Dunn Explores Street Photography since Stieglitz

    Pam Bristow




    During the early decades of the twentieth century, Alfred Stieglitz vividly captured the architecture and urban streetscapes of New York City. The first photographer to take the camera off the tripod, out of the studio, and into the streets, I like to think of Stieglitz as the father of New York City street photography - a genre that has produced some of the most exciting and provocative images of the past eighty years. Stieglitz the man, a central figure in the history of photography and modern art and husband of artist Georgia O'Keeffe, had a very blatant love/hate relationship with my hometown, much like I and most other native and long-time New Yorkers do.

    Filmmaker and New York City photographer Cheryl Dunn can definitely relate. She and I grew up in parallel worlds, slugging it out with a town determined to either destroy or deliver us. We'd cross paths at art openings or photo shoots, secret performances or underground fashion shows... she with her Leica strung around her neck forever chronicling her fellow downtown artists and angling for the perfect shot.

    In conjunction with the just-opened Alfred Stieglitz New York show at Seaport Museum New York, Dunn nods to the controversial old master in a unique film that delivers an intimate portrait of some of the most important New York City photographers to emerge since the 1930's. Her cinematic compilation includes interviews, photographs, and candid footage of the artists, exploring their lifelong dance with New York as their photographic subject. From the poignant images of Bruce Davidson, Mary Ellen Mark, and Rebecca Lepkoff, and to the celebratory photojournalism of hip hop historians Martha Cooper, Jamel Shabazz, and Ricky Powell, to gripping imagery by Clayton Patterson, Bruce Gilden, and Jeff Mermelestein, to the historically significant 911 images of award-winning photographer Joel Meyerowitz, Dunn's film documents a range of shooters with the same passion for New York.

    Alfred Stieglitz New York featuring Everybody Street runs from September 15, 2010 to January 10, 2011 at Seaport Museum New York, 12 Fulton Street in New York City.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pam-br..._b_717573.html

  2. #2
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Photos: Alfred Stieglitz's New York


    Title: The Terminal (Alfred Stieglitz Collection, Courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington)



    (click to enlarge)

    There's a new exhibition of Photographer Alfred Stieglitz's iconic New York City photographs opening at the Seaport Museum today. (The late photographer, who was married to Georgia O'Keeffe, died in the city in 1946.) This is the first time the images will be shown together in almost 80 years; the exhibit features "an unprecedented group of legendary early twentieth century" photographs which will be separated into three galleries.
    The first gallery evokes the spirit of 291, Stieglitzís pioneering gallery, which cemented his reputation as an impresario of European modern art. It will include a facsimile of a lantern slide show, the first time Stieglitzís lantern slides have ever been exhibited, and prints from 1893 to 1916. The second gallery presents portraits taken from the windows of his midtown Manhattan apartment and gallery in the 1930s, when Stieglitz re-engaged New York as a subject for his photography.

    The third gallery examines the explosion of imagery of New York in popular culture and fine arts, including works by renowned photographers Paul Strand, Lewis Hine and Berenice Abbott.
    The images will be on display through January 2011, and here's a little preview.

    http://gothamist.com/2010/09/15/alfr...z_new_york.php

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I'm still trying to figure out the location of "The Terminal" seen in the first photo.

    Stieglitz on "The Terminal":

    From 1893 to 1895 I often walked the streets of New York downtown, near the East River, taking my hand camera with me. . . . [One day] I found myself in front of the old Post Office. . . . It was extremely cold. Snow lay on the ground. A driver in a rubber coat was watering his steaming car horses.

    Though many of Alfred Stieglitz's early photographs relied heavily upon atmosphere to mute the harshness of urban life, he romanticized nothing in this image. At the southern end of the Harlem streetcar line that traveled up and down Fifth Avenue, he simply captured a streetcar driver watering his horses in front of the old Post Office.

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    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ Well, it's not this old post office (as you know ). Still looking.


  5. #5
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    There was an old RR terminal nearby (on Chambers Street, farther to the west), but I think that had been torn down around the 1860's, well before Stieglitz took that shot.

    The photo could have been taken near the old City Hall Post Office that you show above; perhaps we're seeing the front of a building that used to stand on Broadway (in the vicinity of the Woolworth / Transportation buildings near Barclay / Park Place).

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    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Astor House, Broadway between Barclay and Vesey Streets, demolished in 1926.

    The Third Avenue street railway and the Madison Avenue car systems had their terminals there, opposite the old Astor House.
    http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/...s?artobj=69300



    http://www.leshp.org/history/compone...stor-1763-1848

    Astor House was built by John Jacob Astor and opened in 1836 as the Park Hotel. It was located on Broadway between Vesey and Barclay Streets, across from New York City Hall and diagonally across from the New York Herald. The building was designed by Isaiah Rogers in a Greek Revival style.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/40045986@N00/3129757948/

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    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Here it is in relation to the post office c. 1888, and Broadway c. 1875.

    Scanned from New York 1880, Robert A.M. Stern, Thomas Mellins and David Fishman, 1999
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    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    'Alfred Stieglitz New York': New Book Collects Artists' Photographs From NYC For First Time Since 1932

    "Alfred Stieglitz New York" (Skira Rizzoli 2010) accompanies the exhibition of the same name, which is on view until January 10, 2011, at the Seaport Museum New York.



    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bonnie...?ir=New%20York

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Astor House, Broadway between Barclay and Vesey Streets, demolished in 1926.
    Good find. That location is what I was thinking. The Transportation Building at 225 Broadway now stands on the north end of that block (SW corner of Broadway / Barclay).

    It's like the little sister to the Woolworth. A great pair (much marred by the arrival of the new bully oh the block at 10 Barclay) ...


  10. #10
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    There was an old RR terminal nearby (on Chambers Street, farther to the west), but I think that had been torn down around the 1860's, well before Stieglitz took that shot.
    A PHOTO from 1860 of that RR Terminal at Chambers / Hudson and South Fifth Avenue (West Broadway).

    Amazing how small it was.

    Here's a PHOTO of the Hudson RR Terminal built to replace it in 1868 on St. John's Square at Varick / Laight / Hudson / Ericcson Place (where the Holland Tunnel exit / St. John's Rotary is now).

    In the upper right can be seen the frieze with the statue of Cornelius Vanderbilt, which now stands outside Grand Central Terminal (info + picture posted HERE).

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