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Thread: 9.0 Earthquake Strikes Japan

  1. #166
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    To where?

  2. #167

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    @ BBMW, Did you read the story?

  3. #168
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I think Tokyo is learning more than Capitalism from the US......

    *cough*Deepwater*cough*

  4. #169
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    The Simpsons Called It:
    Three Eyed Fish Caught Outside a Nuclear Power Plant


    http://gizmodo.com/5853988/the-simps...ar-power-plant

  5. #170

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    Tsunami debris: Huge dock washes up on Oregon coast


    People inspect a massive dock with Japanese lettering that washed ashore on Agate Beach
    north of Newport, Ore. (Thomas Boyd / The Oregonian / June 6, 2012)

    By Kim Murphy
    June 6, 2012, 5:24 p.m

    SEATTLE — Authorities have confirmed that a 66-foot-long dock that floated onto a beach near Newport, Ore., this week came from Japan — the latest in a growing wave of debris from the earthquake and tsunami that ripped through the Japanese coast in March 2011.

    The Japanese Consulate in Portland confirmed Wednesday that the large floating pier originated at the port of Misawa in northern Japan, and from there appears to have drifted across the Pacific to where it was first spotted Monday on Agate Beach, about a mile north of Newport.

    “It has a metal plaque written in Japanese. It was rather easy to identify where it originated,” Deputy Consul General Hirofumi Murabayashi told the Los Angeles Times.

    By Wednesday afternoon, flocks of people were making their way to the scenic emerald cove where the dock — now surrounded by warning tape — lay beached on the sand like an alien ship.

    “What we have is a really large, well-built dock that survived a cross-ocean voyage,” Chris Havel, spokesman for the Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation, said in an interview with The Times.

    “It’s 66 feet long, 19 feet wide and seven feet tall, covered with reinforced concrete. We’re used to debris and trash that you can pick up and throw in a trash bag, and the occasional vessel that runs aground. Something like this, this large, this heavy, requires a little more careful handling,” he said.

    Authorities say the pier was able to float across an entire ocean because, although covered in concrete, it is filled with Styrofoam.

    The wayward pier is only the latest in what scientists say may be 1 million to 2 million tons of tsunami debris drifting across the Pacific.

    In April, the U.S. Coast Guard unleashed cannon fire to sink a ghost ship found floating off the coast of Alaska after being cast adrift by the tsunami in Hokkaido, Japan. A shipping crate containing aHarley-Davidson motorcycle turned up in British Columbia this year.

    In Oregon, the tsunami debris also contained a bit of living cargo: A starfish native to Japan was among the marine life clinging to the dock, according to scientists from the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport.

    Havel said salvage experts were trying to determine whether the dock could be re-floated at the next high tide and shipped to the port of Newport, or whether it would have to be dismantled in place.

    Murabayashi said Japanese officials didn't care which option the state chose.

    “The owner of this dock is Aomori Prefecture,” he said, “and they told us that they do not wish to have it returned.”

    Los Angeles Times, 202 West 1st Street, Los Angeles, California, 90012 | Copyright 2012

  6. #171
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Do they wish to pay for its removal and disposal?

    I wonder why limited efforts were made to contain or clean up some of this debris before it washed up?

    Some, not all.

  7. #172
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    Yeah, here you go nation of thousands of dead and millions with substantial economic losses, here is your bill for the dock. Pay within 30 days, k thanks.

  8. #173
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Seems like they'd want to just keep it there as an oddity/tourist attraction.

  9. #174
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    You don't read winkeys, do ya GG

  10. #175

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    The last line of the article may seem silly, but it falls within maritime law with respect to salvage.

    Since this is technically not a recovery at sea, I'm not sure how the law applies; but the person who salvages the property must contact the owner. If the owner wants it back, fair compensation is given.

    If not, finders-keepers.

  11. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    You don't read winkeys, do ya GG
    My winkeys are invisible

  12. #177

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    August 20, 2013

    300 Tons of Contaminated Water Leak From Japanese Nuclear Plant

    By HIROKO TABUCHI

    TOKYO — Three hundred tons of highly contaminated water have leaked from a storage tank at the ravaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on Japan’s Pacific Coast, its operator said on Tuesday, raising further concerns over the site’s safety and prompting regulators to declare a radiological release incident for the first time since disaster struck there in 2011.

    Workers raced to place sandbags around the leak at the site to stem the spread of the water, a task made more urgent by a forecast of heavy rain for the Fukushima region later in the day. A spokesman at Tokyo Electric Power, the plant’s operator, acknowledged that much of the contaminated water had seeped into the soil and could eventually reach the ocean, adding to the tons of radioactive fluids that have already leaked into the sea from the troubled plant.

    The leaked water contains levels of radioactive cesium and strontium many hundreds of times higher than legal safety limits, Tokyo Electric said. Exposure to either element is known to increase the risk of cancer.

    The company said it had not determined the source of the leak.

    “We must prevent the contaminated water from dispersing further due to rain and are piling up more sandbags,” said Masayuki Ono, a spokesman for the operator, also known as Tepco. But he also said much of the water has been absorbed into the soil, and workers would need to try to remove some of the soil using shovel cars and other heavy machinery.

    Tepco has acknowledged in recent weeks that leaks of radioactive runoff at the site, about 150 miles north of Tokyo, are at crisis levels. The runoff comes from cooling water that workers are pumping into the damaged cores of the site’s three most damaged reactors, as well as from groundwater pouring into the breached basements of those reactors.

    Some of that runoff has been seeping into the ocean since the accident at the site in 2011, triggered by a powerful earthquake and a 14-meter tsunami. To reduce the leaks, Tepco has started pumping out some of the contaminated water and storing it in almost 1,000 large tanks it has built on the debris-strewn site.

    Tepco hopes to start cleansing the water using an elaborate filtering system and start releasing low-level contaminated water into the ocean. Those plans have been delayed by technical problems and protests from local fishermen.

    Desperate for options, Japan’s nuclear regulator has suggested surrounding the plant with a huge underground ice wall to stem any leaks. That plan has its own drawbacks, however, and would require huge amounts of electricity almost indefinitely.

    The latest leak comes from one of the site’s 1,000 tanks, about 500 yards inland, Tepco said. Workers discovered puddles of radioactive water near the tank on Monday. Further checks revealed that the 1,000-ton capacity vessel, thought to be nearly full, only contained 700 tons, with the remainder having almost certainly leaked out.

    There had been concerns raised among some experts over the durability of the tanks. Mr. Ono said that Tepco had assumed the tanks would last at least five years, but the latest leak comes less than two years after the company started installing the storage vessels at the site to deal with the growing amounts of runoff.

    “It is going to be very difficult and dangerous for Tepco to keep on storing all this water,” said Hiroshi Miyano, an expert in nuclear system design at Hosei University in Tokyo. He said, for example, that another strong earthquake or tsunami could destroy the tanks and lead to a huge spill.

    At some point, Tepco will have no choice but to start releasing some of the water into the ocean after cleaning it, Dr. Miyano said. The continued mishaps at the site have heightened public scrutiny of Tepco and made it more difficult to build public consensus around any release of water, he said.

    “That just makes the problem worse, with no viable solution,” he said.

    The Nuclear Regulation Authority described the leak as a Level 1 incident, the lowest level, on a global scale that rates radiological releases. This was the first time that Japan had declared a radiological event since earthquake and tsunami in March 2011, which was rated at Level 7, the highest on that scale and on par with the 1986 accident at Chernobyl.

    In a statement, the regulator ordered Tepco to do its utmost to identify the exact source of the leak, to step up radiation monitoring at the site and to remove contaminated soil. Tepco said it would do its best to comply.

    Makiko Inoue contributed reporting from Tokyo.

    © 2013 The New York Times Company

  13. #178
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    It just keeps getting better, doesn't it?

    Nothing to worry about though, they have lots of sandbags

  14. #179
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Holy Glowing Blowfish Batman!

  15. #180
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    I was misled as a child - I was presented with an image of Japan as a bastion of high standards & quality, where things are done properly and substandard efforts are not tolerated. Yeah right

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