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Thread: 'Secret' Midtown Pedestrian Passageways to Get More Exposure Under New Plan

  1. #16
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Hmm I was not aware of the tree situation.

  2. #17
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I posted some recent shots of that sad plaza somewhere at WNY a while back.

    Excuse me while I search through 28K posts ...

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    Midtown Manhattan May Link 6-Block Corridor For Pedestrians To Stroll

    by Marjorie Backman

    (see article for slideshow)

    Tourists dawdle along the sidewalks, office workers try to brush by and cars crawl through the streets. Sometimes it seems like Midtown Manhattan has no place to breathe. But what if a magic corridor were to open up?

    Well, it already has. A hidden path of sorts snakes between the towers from West 57th Street to West 51st Street, midway between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. It exists because a 1961 zoning resolution let private developers build even higher if they contributed plazas and parks for public use. And for these six blocks, city planners managed to align six privately owned public arcades and plazas.

    The resulting corridor lies under the radar for most passersby. Signage is muted, and anyone trying to walk the whole route must cross the six streets that intersect it.

    But now New York City is proposing a dramatic intervention for those interrupting streets: raised crosswalks. The street would be somewhat elevated for motorists but not for pedestrians, according to Seth Solomonow, a spokesman for New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. Raj Mann, who chairs Manhattan Community Board 5's transportation committee, said the slightly raised crosswalks would serve as cues for pedestrians looking to cross the street. Plus, their height would serve to "calm" traffic, he said. Stop signs would signal to drivers to slow down.


    An illustration of a raised crosswalk


    "Meet Me on 6 1/2 Avenue," announced the New York Observer last week. "For Walkers, a Sixth-and-a-Half Ave. May Take Shape," declared The New York Times.

    The idea bubbled up from the community. Advocacy group Friends of Privately Owned Public Space conferred with the West 54th-55th Street Block Association before making a presentation to Community Board 5 last year. By May 2011, the community board's transportation committee had asked the city to study ways to improve "the visibility and safe utilization of these urban plazas" by "identifying them with clear but unobtrusive pedestrian-oriented signage" and "creating controlled and clearly-marked pedestrian crossings."

    To the surprise of these community players, by last week the city's Department of Transportation had not only studied the idea but also worked up its own proposal.
    "Across the city we're making changes to enhance the valuable public pedestrian space we already have," Sadik-Khan said in a statement last week. "A lot of people don't know that these places exist, hidden within buildings. In particular this is a kind of a secret pedestrian avenue that's like 6th-and-a-half-Avenue for pedestrians, and this would really energize these places with foot traffic."

    On March 26, Community Board 5's transportation committee gave a tentative thumbs up to the city's plan, recommending that the full board consider the proposal on April 12. If the plan goes forward, city officials must report back in a few months so adjustments can be made. There's "a lot of enthusiasm," said Mann, who personally favors the project, while allowing that there are "still some concerns about the impact on traffic circulation."

    "In a way, the hard work has been done," said Brian Nesin, founder of Friends of Privately Owned Public Space. "The city created public easements through these six buildings in midtown. The work that [the Department of Transportation] is proposing should be easy and inexpensive," he said. "In a way it seems like a no-brainer."

    Cars already stop at the avenues, so the extra stop signs shouldn't present "a major impasse," he said.

    "Pending full board approval, this could be implemented in June," Solomonow said.

    Last October, Friends of Privately Owned Public Space hosted what it called the first parade and pedestrian tour through the area, informally dedicating the route as Holly Whyte Way after an influential urbanist.

    While more than 500 privately owned public spaces in the city exist, urban planner Jerold Kayden wrote in his 2000 book "Publicly Owned Public Space" that this set of six amounts to the city's "longest, most successful mid-block pedestrian network." Now it just might become even easier to visit.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...l?ref=new-york

  4. #19
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    6½th Avenue Gets Greenlight: Pedestrian Passageway Approved by Community Board, Installation in June

    By Matt Chaban


    Coming to a Midtown intersection near you. (NYC DOT)

    “I think this is a very important opportunity for this community to back this avenue, which was given to the developers decades ago,” Nancy Goshow said last Thursday night, during a meeting of Community Board 5. “The developers have gotten all the benefits for too long, and it is time we as a community take back these spaces and really push them to be improved and made as nice as possible.”

    Ms. Goshow was one of a majority of board members who declared her support for what has come to be known as 6½th Avenue, a Department of Transportation proposal to link a series of arcades and public plazas running from 51st to 57th streets between Sixth and Seventh avenues. The spaces were created through a special zoning district in the 1980s and early ’90s, and are made up of Zuccotti-like privately owned public space, or POPS. In exchange for building the spaces, developers got the opportunity to build bigger buildings.

    Last year, the community board, at the suggestion of Friends of POPS, a pro-POPS civic group, asked the Department of Transportation to study ways it might connect these spaces. They are already a popular pedestrian thoroughfare, especially during lunch time and at rush hour, providing a less hectic alternative to the avenues on either side. The board wanted to make the spaces even more inviting.

    The department returned in late March with the idea of installing raised crosswalks and stop signs, which the board’s transportation subcommittee supported. A vote was expected last month but delayed while the department continued to study traffic impacts. On Thursday, the department presented these findings, which it said would in no way slow down travel times, and the boarded voted in favor of the plan 2-to-1.

    “This is an innovative project, and it’s one we asked for, so I think this is a pretty exciting moment for the board,” transportation committee chair Raju Mann said.
    For those who still doubted the plan, even they admitted it was more general skepticism and intuition than anything else driving their concerns. “These findings defy logic,” board member Ron Dwenger said. “I don’t see how this will not cause congestion, but we’ll see.” The department argues that drivers will simply experience two shorter stops rather than one long one at the corner. “Odds are you’d be waiting for a red light, not missing a green,” Mr. Mann said.

    Slideshow: Take a stroll along 6½th Avenue >>

    Joel Maxman, a member of the transportation committee, felt that the department did the plan in reverse, coming up with a traffic proposal, then studying it, rather than studying traffic patterns and coming up with a solution to them. “This was totally backwards,” he said. “I’m still probably going to support this, but we have some real issues of process at the DOT.”

    Kate McDonough countered the usual steamrolling Department of Transportation narrative, though, saying that no city agency took a more grassroots approach to its projects. “In my experience, working with DOT has been one of the most rewarding experiences of being on the community board.” She and other board members commended the department for taking an idea from the community and implementing it, rather than coming up with its own proposals and imposing them from above.

    Ms. McDonough did sound a note of caution, echoed by many on the board. “The idea is great, but the execution has to be monitored,” she said. The department has promised to keep an eye on traffic patterns and present its findings to the board in the fall. Should any issues in the plan, from difficulty with deliveries to traffic delays, present themselves, the department has promised to work on solutions to address the problems.

    Another issue the board is working on is partnering with the Department of City Planning, which regulates POPS, to improve access and standards along the route. Currently, there are a few illegal sidewalk cafes and other installations in violation of the zoning, which the board wants removed. Also, the open hours for the paths are not currently consistent—some are open 24 hours a day, others shutter as early as 7 p.m. “We hope to make it so everything is open around the same times, and of the same quality,” Mr. Mann said.

    Now that it has secured the board’s support, the Department of Transportation expects to install the crosswalks during the latter half of June, an effort that should only take a few hours per intersection.

    “It was fun to work on a project that came up from the community, to chew on it, come back, and get their huge support,” Josh Benson, the department’s director of bicycling and pedestrian programs said after the board’s vote. “It was a nice process, and one that will make the city a little nicer as a result.”

    Slowing Down 6½th Avenue: DOT Waits to Bring Crosswalk Plan to a Vote
    John Updike Would Have Loved 6½th Avenue Even If the Dailies Don’t
    Paving the Way for 6½th Avenue: Midtown Community Board Committee Gives Pedestrian Plan Unanimous Support
    Meet Me on 6½th Avenue: DOT Planning Public Promenade Through Middle of Midt

    http://www.observer.com/2012/05/6%C2...led-in-summer/

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  6. #21
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    midblock crosswalk = "intersection"?

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    Crowded Midtown Manhattan Gets a New Avenue: 6 and 1/2 Ave (in Pictures)



    When does a street that’s not a street become official? Well, first it needs a name. Then it needs a street sign. (Photo by Kate Hinds) Addresses on the avenues of midtown Manhattan bestow a certain prestige for the law firms, TV networks, ad agencies and luxury hotels that populate the glass and steel canyons north of Times Square. So it’s a bold move to wedge a new “avenue” in between 6th and 7th Avenues from 51st to 57th street. Or at least the naming is bold. The trail of pedestrian walkways between and under the skyscrapers has long existed as a public secret for midtown office workers looking to save a few minutes on the walk to grab lunch.

    But, in giving this stretch of walkways a name, the New York City Department of Transportation is encouraging more walking. Even more than the cute name, they do so by painting crosswalks and stopping traffic mid-block where people already jaywalked with more than the usual amount of New York pavement entitlement (if that’s possible).

    And if DOT signage isn’t official enough, Google Maps already recognizes the avenue. So, as Gawker points out, you can now legitimately tell someone to meet you at 55th Street and 6 1/2.
    TN’s Kate Hinds took a walk down New York’s newest avenue. Here’s what it looks like.


    Cars are still getting used to stopping at the mid-block crosswalks that connect the string
    of covered walkways. (Photo by Kate Hinds)


    Even the "Ave" is shorted to "Av" because it's a little street. (Photo by Kate Hinds)


    Restaurants within the walkways now have a swanky new second address to use if they like.
    No word if the Post Office will honor mail sent that way. (Photo by Kate Hinds)


    New painted crosswalks also guide pedestrians to the next leg of 6 1/2 Avenue (Photo by Kate Hinds)


    Passage north of 54th Street (Photo by Kate Hinds)


    57th Street -- the northern end of the avenue (Photo by Kate Hinds)

    http://transportationnation.org/2012...e-in-pictures/

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A sorry example of what developers do with the "bonus" they are granted to build bigger. They get millions in buildable square feet and we get dark alleys, usually not well kept or inviting to the public.

  9. #24
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    lofter, why the long face? I'm glad we have a few midblock passages sprinkled around town...

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I like the access through the midblocks, but for the most part these lanes have not been constructed in a very good way.

    Plus the July heat + humidity makes me cranky

  11. #26
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I am still trying to find things that don't.



    (make me cranky)

  12. #27
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    You two should get together with a pitcher of lemonade. (Or root beer?)

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Excuse me while I search through 28K posts ...
    Are you still looking L1?......maybe that's why you're so cranky...err...hot?...

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    You two should get together with a pitcher of lemonade. (Or root beer?)
    Now I'm friggin' Snoopy?

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    Midtown Arcades: 6 1/2 Avenue and other POPS

    by Adee Braun

    There are deviants among the orderly gridlines of Midtown Manhattan. They are not secret, but not so obvious either. You might have even passed by without knowing you could access them, or you may have passed through one thinking, defiantly, that you were trespassing. The arcades of Midtown connect one street to another through a building. They are the strange children of the ongoing public-private love affair dotted around New York City called POPS, privately own public spaces. Zuccotti Park on Wall Street is perhaps the most famous example. These urban nesting dolls were built to provide the public with shortcuts, shelter and gathering spaces. Many are clustered amongst the dense buildings of Midtown.


    photo via The Observer

    POPS have been around since 1961 when New York City adopted a new zoning resolution that incentivized building developers with bonus space and other concessions in exchange for providing spaces for public use; plazas, through block arcades and connections, atriums, and other indoor and outdoor spaces. In the decade and a half that followed, 70 percent of the buildings that qualified to earn a bonus took the incentive—some 67 buildings between 1966-1975. In exchange for creating a through block arcade, for example, developers received six square feet for every square foot of public space. Irresistible. Today there are over 500 POPS around New York City. The City’s longest chain of arcades (for the sake of simplicity, we’ll call them arcades despite the slight distinctions between through block arcades, through block connections and through block gallerias) are the six blocks between 51st and 57th streets between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. Most of these were constructed after the 1986 rezoning of Midtown which required new mid-block developments to provide more spaces for the public.

    But the question is, are these arcades useful? Jerold S. Kayden, who wrote Privately Owned Public Spaces: The New York City Experience, (with a great companion website), argues that the results have been mixed. While some spaces are social gathering spots, others are unkempt and desolate. Some are inviting and visibly open to the public while others have been quietly annexed by their owners—in effect, privatized. As Kayden points out: “Members of the public cannot be certain that they have the right to use a public space if they do not know whether is it, indeed, public.” There have been some recent improvements. In August 2012 the NYC Department of Transportation completed a plan to improve the accessibility and visibility of the chain by installing crosswalks and street signs. Thus, 6 1/2 Avenue was officially born. Some of the arcades that make up the avenue are fully covered passageways, some are book-ended by doors or gates, others are mostly exposed to the elements. Some have chairs and tables, some just benches, and some are a simple corridor, and vary as much in functionality as they do in style and shape. Walking down, or through, 6 ½ Avenue feels a little deviant. But also, incredibly satisfying—striding through buildings thinking about the suckers left out in the cold, weaving through the mobs half an avenue away.

    A walk down 6 ½ Avenue

    There are three points of entry on 57th street: 889 Seventh Avenue, which is adjacent to Carnegie Hall, a fully enclosed arcade in shiny green and rust marble; the Metropolitan Tower at 46 West 57th Street, the most direct entry point and one that feels most like stepping into a brokers bachelor pad circa 1986 with its straight lines, polished black stone, electric blue accent lighting and string of built-in mini TVs; or Le Parker Méridien at 118 west 57th street, which is perhaps the most interesting.


    Le Parker Méridien, 118 West 57th Street

    Sometimes owners don’t get the concept of public use. Since 1979 Le Parker Méridien has battled with the City over its elegant lobby, which is technically an arcade. The hotel is required to provide a certain number of tables and chairs for the public, which it has neglected to do over the years. But the thing you notice upon entering at 57th street is that half the lobby has been appropriated by The Knave, the hotel’s Gothic style cafe and bar that sells third-wave coffee and $5 mineral water. It’s actually quite beautiful and cozy. And, it’s actually in clear violation of POPS regulations. Kayden claims that about half of the POPS are in some sort of violation. I asked one woman at the cafe if she knew she was sitting in a public space. “Well, it’s a hotel…” she answered. I explained the difference between a hotel lobby and a private space for public use. She seemed both moderately interested and moderately annoyed. I left her to her Elderflower Spritz.


    Metropolitan Tower, 146 West 57th Street

    The arcade at 146 West 57th Street is another starting point for the 6 1/2 Avenue chain. It provides direct access through the block to 56th Street. The only problem is that it looks too much like a sleek 1980′s lobby, which it is. The lobby of Metropolitan Tower has a security guard and doors at either end, making it practical for the cold and hot months, but rather unwelcoming. As with the co-opted retail spaces of Le Parker Méridien and 1325 Sixth Avenue, this space acts overwhelmingly like a lobby, despite the signage that it is open to the public. I suppose if you frequently walk in and out of there on your way to work, you might get used to this. But if you are simply a pedestrian out of the know, you might feel like an uninvited guest, as I did.


    City Spire Condos, 156 West 56th Street

    The arcade at City Spire Condos, 156 West 56th Street, connects 55th and 56th streets. The arcade is a little desolate and uninspired, but functional. The ’80s Art Deco design and walls lined with theater posters bring some interest into the space. It’s fully enclosed and climate controlled, making it one luxurious POPS. The downside is that it’s dark, which I suspect is why it doesn’t seem to be used that much. I’ve occasionally walked through this arcade on my way to or from City Center Theater just down the block. Yet, I’ve never seen more than a one or two lone pedestrians walking through with me. The arcade is open until midnight, and while Midtown is a relatively safe area, it’s a little unnerving to walk into a completely empty enclosed hall like this alone.


    151 West 54th Street

    Like City Spire, this arcade at 151 West 54th street which connects 54th and 55th streets, is designed purely for moving pedestrians from one street to another. There are no benches for lingering, which is fine because although it is a covered arcade, it is otherwise exposed to the elements. The arcade abuts the London Hotel at one end and is enclosed with gates on both sides. Because the space is so open and there are friendly topiaries by the hotel side, it’s a pleasant walk especially on a sunny day when the light pours through the glass roof. So pleasant, in fact, that a homeless man had settled in by one of the planters where he sat smoking a cigar.


    1325 Sixth Avenue

    This open-air arcade at 1325 Sixth Avenue links 53rd and 54th streets. With ample tables and chairs, the arcade is a popular destination for an outdoor Midtown lunch in the warmer months, but it’s rather vacant in the winter. The soaring three-story-tall glass roof provides shelter and light, and the generous width of the space makes it feel more open and inviting than the narrower arcades. However, Kayden notes that on one visit, the cafes and restaurants had spread out their chairs and tables a little too widely, cluttering up the passageway for pedestrians. Yet another example of the co-habitational tensions between the private and public claims on POPS.


    135 West 52nd Street

    On the day I visited 135 West 52nd street, the arcade that links 53rd and 52nd streets, it looked as if the trash cans had had a food fight. Most of the arcades are tidy, so this was a surprise. The arcade is lined with otherwise inviting benches and is enclosed by gates, which Kayden sites were locked on one of his visits during supposed open hours. The relative enclosure of the space and all the litter makes it rather uninviting. Though with some sweeping and warmer weather, it’s possible to imagine the benches being used. Even so, this is a quick resting place rather than a meeting or lingering spot. The benches along this narrow passage give the feeling of a corridor or waiting room. But a clean place to sit is always welcome in the big city.


    AXA Building, 787 Seventh Avenue

    The end (or the beginning) of 6 1/2 Avenue brings you to the arcade of the AXA Building at 787 Seventh Avenue, between 51st and 52nd streets. This arcade connects two streets while also inviting people to look around or sit down. Barry Flanagan’s sculpture “Young Elephant” is the bonze centerpiece of this dynamic space. The colorful walls with stacked and jutting layers of windows makes you want to walk through and examine the arcade at all angles. Lunching on one of the solid stone benches inside this geometric space feels a bit like sitting inside a Rubik’s Cube. In a good way. And because it is so open with are no obstructing tables, people walk through at all hours, making it a prime people-watching spot.

    More Midtown arcades


    40 West 57th Street

    Though not part of the 6 ½ Avenue stretch, this arcade provides a direct passage between 57th and 56th streets between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Kayden calls it the “‘Model-T’ of through block arcades” because it exists with the simple purpose of bringing pedestrians from one street through another. And, it does so in a bright and inviting way. It is fully covered, yet door-less, brightly lit, clean and clearly meant to be walked through. It is utilitarian in that it has no benches, but is is also welcoming with whimsical sculptures lining the walls.


    Millennium Broadway Hotel, 145 West 44th Street

    The Millennium Broadway Hotel at 145 West 44th Street is another hotel-lobby that is a POPS in disguise. Though not as hidden as Le Parker Méridien’s lobby, it is not obvious that the Millennium’s lobby is a public arcade. It has disappeared behind velvet seating areas and marble concierge desks. It just looks too nice to be public! I passed through the arcade knowing that I had every right to be there, but I still felt as if I were slipping past the doormen at the Plaza Hotel to gawk at all the filigree.

    Arcades like the ones at the Millennium Broadway and Le Parker Méridien are near-secret spaces used by those in the know or with sharp enough eyesight to notice the “Public Space” sign. As Kayden notes: “the positive side of this private-public merger is that there is no stinting on quality…The negative side is that the very identity of the space as public disappears.” While it’s fun to be on the inside of such a secret, it defeats the purpose of POPS. The fundamental problem with POPS lies in its very nature. Private owners want to use their property the way they want to, which is often in conflict with the way the public would like them to.

    The effectiveness of the Midtown arcades is a balancing act. The space cannot be too enclosed and unwelcoming, or too open and misused. The most successful arcades are the plaza-like ones that don’t need signage to convey they are public. The balancing act is especially precarious because unlike the classic pedestrian arcades of Europe which are lined with shop windows that act as eyes and ears, the arcades of Midtown are artificial constructs. While the arcades are practical as congestion-alleviators and time savers, more care needs to be taken to make them consistently inviting. These arcades were born out of a mid-80′s private-public love affair. But, when an affair ends, it’s always the kids that suffer.

    http://untappedcities.com/newyork/20...-arcades-pops/

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