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Thread: Hampton Inn (231 E 43rd St)

  1. #1

    Default Hampton Inn (231 E 43rd St)

    16 Jan 2012 - 14 fl up


  2. #2
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Street walls are for chumps.

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I hesitated to look at DOB, assuming from the setback that this was a Kaufman special. Wrong.

    The Architect for this New Building is Stonehill & Taylor, the same team who did the Crosby Street Hotel.

    When I dug a little deeper at DOB for this lot, I found a Disapproved plan for a hotel from 2007, back when this site was owned by Sam Chang.

    Guess who was the architect on that one?

  4. #4

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    Every one of this atrocities I see, it makes me want to work harder and smarter to be able to earn enough money to some day buy up these pieces of trash, tear them down, and restore whatever prewar buildings may have once stood here.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    ... and restore whatever prewar buildings may have once stood here.
    These buildings are replacing parking lots and temporary taxpayers, not typical Manhattan prewars.

    There may be some cases where prewars once stood on some of these sites, but we're generally talking many decades ago, before the parking lots started sprouting.

  6. #6

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    I agree. While these hotels are all pretty fugly, and I do wish some more thought went into their design, they also provide a valuable resource to the City, which needs lots more clean, reasonably priced hotels for the hordes of tourists who support the local economy but cannot afford $800 per night at the Ritz. These places usually run $150-200 per night for a clean, decent room, run by a chain with corporate standards that out-of-town tourists can generally trust. And as AS points out, they are almost always built on parking lots in crappy, mid-block locations which are no great shakes to begin with.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    These buildings are replacing parking lots and temporary taxpayers, not typical Manhattan prewars.

    There may be some cases where prewars once stood on some of these sites, but we're generally talking many decades ago, before the parking lots started sprouting.
    I don't buy that for a second. Just on the block where my girlfriend works -- 36th between 5th and 6th -- they ("they" being McSam and others) knocked down one series of rowhouses a few years ago, and there's now a POS future cheapo hotel going up there. Effectively next to that site (there's one solitary old pre-war standing, soon to be surrounded awkwardly by two buildings set back hideously from the streetwall) is another cheapo hotel.

    Next to the (fantastic) Setai on the corner with 5th Ave, another fairly lame Lam building is going up. All of these hideous buildings replaced prewar structures that, yes, need a cleaning and house cruddy import-export businesses. But if cleaned up and rented to higher-scale tenants, those fantastic Garment District structures would be the next Chelsea, or Flatiron district.

    And just now, we have this: http://therealdeal.com/blog/2012/01/...ite-for-19-6m/

    Yet another cruddy hotel resulting in the wholesale destruction of pre-war structures. And sure it'll add a few $150 rooms that are spiffy now, but in 10 years these buildings -- among the cheapest and crappiest built anywhere in the world (and I'm currently in Russia for work, so I know crappy when I see it!) -- will be falling apart and the massive slew of new budget hotels will all be roach motels on par with the Hotel Carter.

    The city needs to address the destruction of the Garment District and the proliferation of crapitecture by the likes of Gene Kaufman (while chilling out over Jean Nouvel and Morris Adjmi projects), or before we know it we'll have the architectural and infrastructural equivalent of a rundown Cairo exurb occupying a large swath of Midtown West.

  8. #8

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    Cross-post from NYC Hotel News - April 30th, 2012, 12:02 AM

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    The 20-story Hampton Inn growing up at 231-233 East 43rd Street by Stonehill & Taylor Architects.


  9. #9
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    I just wish they werent so damn cheap looking. This one looks particularly bad.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPC View Post
    I agree. While these hotels are all pretty fugly, and I do wish some more thought went into their design, they also provide a valuable resource to the City, which needs lots more clean, reasonably priced hotels for the hordes of tourists who support the local economy but cannot afford $800 per night at the Ritz. These places usually run $150-200 per night for a clean, decent room, run by a chain with corporate standards that out-of-town tourists can generally trust. And as AS points out, they are almost always built on parking lots in crappy, mid-block locations which are no great shakes to begin with.
    Agreed. I think most of us here have no issue with budget hotels as much as with their execution. I understand, cheaper projects mean cheaper designs and materials, but we're not asking for flashy starchitecture for every hotel here. The least they could do is, say, respect the streetwall and use less wacky facade patterns and materials.

  11. #11

    Default 6 Jan 2013


  12. #12
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Darn it, I wish I hadn't looked .

  13. #13

    Default 2 March 2013










  14. #14

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    I just threw up in my mouth.

  15. #15
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Mesmerizing. I am intrigued by the use of the "natural" stone caps on the floor plates. It's actually really different for one of these, and the kind of thing we usually demand here. I suspect from the photo-to-reality conversion I generally do in my head, this is one of the better finished one of these. It still suffers mightily from the broken street wall, but it's not built as a driveway, as some of these are, which means it will likely become outdoor seating for a restaurant soon, and that will work well to rectify the issue.

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