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Thread: 24 John St. - Even More Vertical Enhancement

  1. #1
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Default 24 John St. - Even More Vertical Enhancement

    You'd think someone has been sprinkling Viagra all over FiDi. I hadn't even noticed this until I discovered John St. was closed this morning so every last building between Nassau and Broadway could have steel dropped on it.

    Bisweb says we're going from 7 stories to 21 and 206 ft. Looks like we're headed for a hotel. Maybe more exciting is that the Sched. A shows a restaurant on the 20th and 21st floors. That might rock hard.







    Map:
    http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=24...6.86,,0,-37.53



    Lower Manhattan Info:
    http://www.lowermanhattan.info/const...eet_82743.aspx

    Not seeing any renderings.

  2. #2
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    So much for the era of no slivers allowed.

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Yep, DOB shows Hotel with 128 rooms.

    Architect: Gerald J. Caliendo

    From the look of the firm's project portfolio we shouldn't get our hopes up.

  4. #4

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    They seem to specialize in McMansions.

  5. #5

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    It's a shame that the little POS next to it won't come down.

  6. #6

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    Apparently they will be reclad.
    The tiny rendering on his website:




    Last edited by Derek2k3; April 23rd, 2012 at 07:40 PM.

  7. #7
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Wow. Well, ignore my other post. Excellent find!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    So much for the era of no slivers allowed.
    Aside from unfortunate exceptions that suffer because of their design, in general, slivers rule. They combine the best of many typologies - small footprints are scaled for pedestrian use, narrow floors allow for greater sunlight and views, and tall height increases density and skyline appeal. Of course, slivers can't replace, say, cash making office towers, but there is usually never a single, universal solution.

  9. #9

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    Slivers are awesome. Manhattan needs far more slivers.

    They maintain the visual interest at street level while adding the density on difficult sites. They're also valuable tools for preservation, allowing for both economic growth and maintenance of existing structures. Much better than giant blockbusters, and much better than clumsy bureaucratic anti-growth zoning like downzoning or blanket landmarking everything.

  10. #10
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    They're also only slivers until everything else on the street gets built to that height (inevitable). It's not much different then all of the great photos from the early 20th century as apartment houses on the upper west side were built around 1 and two story ramshackle buildings.

  11. #11

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    I like slivers when they're lot-line walls are treated competently.







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  13. #13

    Default 13 October 2012


  14. #14

    Default 30 March 2013




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