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Thread: National September 11 Museum - by Aedas

  1. #16

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    ^
    It fulfills the terms of the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding with the LMDC.

    This is the MOU between the PA and the Museum/Memorial: http://www.governor.ny.gov/assets/do...-MOU-Final.pdf

    In Section 4, Master Operating Agreement and Advisory Committee - the "Land Swap" is mentioned.

    That land is site 5. The LMDC, which still owns site 5, was to transfer ownership to the PA in exchange for the PA handing the 8 acre memorial site to the foundation. The exchange could not be concluded until the dispute was resolved. I guess the only reason we didn't know about it is that there is no current demand for site 5.

    Also, much of the dispute was about the PA wanting more control over ceremonies and events at the memorial site.

    I remember a comment on one of these threads that site 5 is used to fulfill the commitment to replace the office space lost on 09/11. That's not correct. The WTC site is restricted to commercial development only, but site 5 can be used for anything.

  2. #17

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    Downtown Express
    September 19, 2012

    Editorial

    9/11 museum deal only halfway there

    The settlement made between the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the National Sept. 11 Memorial is a crucial step forward toward resolving the year-long financial impasse that has significantly thwarted progress at the World Trade Center site. Having a written agreement forces both sides to commit to a set of guidelines that didn’t previously exist. It requires the executives and politicians to sit across a table from one another and share budget data, offer construction updates and relay other essential information concerning the build-out of the 9/11 museum.

    But the battle is only half over. Without continued leadership and close supervision by the mayor and the governors of New York and New Jersey, the agreement itself could become another flashpoint of contention, and delays at the site could recur. The authorities must now systematically work to implement the agreement.

    It is clear that the rebuilding of the shattered site is one of the most complex construction projects in the world. It entails billions of dollars, careful synchronization of construction and the build-out of millions of square feet — not to mention the needed collaboration of a host of stakeholders, contractors, government agencies and elected leaders.

    This site can ill afford to be plagued by further discord and delay. Downtown and the world have witnessed what has happened when disputes drag on too long, as exemplified by the financial stand-off between developer Larry Silverstein and the Port Authority concerning the future office towers.

    We hope that the agreement will provide the impetus and framework for resolving the existing problems and preventing future stand-offs.

    Moving forward, Downtown community members and 9/11 families must also remain vigilant by holding the involved parties and politicians accountable for construction mishaps, cost overruns and other snags. Community Board 1, in particular, must continue to invite Port Authority and Memorial officials to its committee meetings for updates and answers.

    We strongly support the agreement to seek federal funding to cover a share of the estimated $60 million a year needed for operations. A proposed law, were it to pass through Congress, would oblige the federally-funded National Park Service to contribute $20 million annually to the memorial. Once the museum opens, the public should also chip in financially by paying a mandatory admission fee or making a donation at the door.

    Not everyone has faith in the settlement. A group of 9/11 families and firefighters is contesting the formation of an advisory board, which, according to the agreement, is meant to mitigate future disputes between the Port Authority and the 9/11 Memorial Museum. The group believes that the advisory board will precipitate years of fighting between the Port and the foundation board, and that the only viable solution is for the license of the memorial to be transferred from the memorial to the National Park Service.

    One constant that we have learned after 11 years of W.T.C. discussions and deliberations is that not everyone agrees.

    The Port Authority must now determine a realistic completion date for the museum. The date should allow for a modest degree of wiggle room so that, in the event of unforeseen delays, the agency doesn’t fall hopelessly behind its benchmark.

    Governors Cuomo and Christie, Mayor Bloomberg and the Port Authority must maintain the momentum of this agreement and assure its successful implementation. It is estimated that, once completed, the museum will attract two million visitors annually.

    Now is the time for the Port Authority to sprint toward the finish line.

  3. #18

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    Associated Press
    September 20, 2012

    Family members of Sept. 11 victims renew criticism of redevelopment of World Trade Center site

    By DAVID PORTER

    NEW YORK — Families of victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks renewed their criticism of the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site Thursday as the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey officially approved a memorandum of understanding with the foundation that will operate a museum at the site.

    The Port Authority, which owns the land where the Twin Towers once stood, announced an agreement on Sept. 10 with the foundation that controls the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.

    The deal gives the foundation the land for the museum; in exchange, the Port Authority takes over the site of the former Deutsche Bank building.

    Family members echoed previous complaints that the multimillion-dollar deal was made without public input.

    Sally Regenhard of Yonkers, whose son died on Sept. 11, called the land swap “immoral, unethical and illegal.” She told board members at Thursday’s monthly meeting that she and other family members will push for a congressional investigation into how money has been spent in the redevelopment.

    Port Authority Executive Director Patrick Foye said that the deal doesn’t change terms from an agreement made in 2006.

    Regenhard and other family members who spoke Thursday also harshly criticized plans to put unidentified remains of victims underground in the museum, a dispute that is making its way through the courts.

    Foye said the placement of the remains was not a decision made by the Port Authority but by other family members.

    “We have throughout solicited views from 9/11 family members, and they have differing views,” Foye said. “Given the fact that 84 members of the Port Authority family were included in that group killed on 9/11, those views are taken with great seriousness and respect here, and resonate with all of us.”

    It remains unclear how the foundation will cover the projected $60 million needed annually to run the memorial and museum. The museum was due to open for this year’s 11th anniversary but was stalled by the dispute between the foundation and the Port Authority. It might not be ready for next year’s anniversary, foundation head Joseph Daniels told The Associated Press recently.

    Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

  4. #19

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    Downtown Express
    September 19, 2012

    9/11 museum deal only halfway there

    The settlement made between the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the National Sept. 11 Memorial is a crucial step forward toward resolving the year-long financial impasse that has significantly thwarted progress at the World Trade Center site. Having a written agreement forces both sides to commit to a set of guidelines that didn’t previously exist. It requires the executives and politicians to sit across a table from one another and share budget data, offer construction updates and relay other essential information concerning the build-out of the 9/11 museum.

    But the battle is only half over. Without continued leadership and close supervision by the mayor and the governors of New York and New Jersey, the agreement itself could become another flashpoint of contention, and delays at the site could recur. The authorities must now systematically work to implement the agreement.

    It is clear that the rebuilding of the shattered site is one of the most complex construction projects in the world. It entails billions of dollars, careful synchronization of construction and the build-out of millions of square feet — not to mention the needed collaboration of a host of stakeholders, contractors, government agencies and elected leaders.

    This site can ill afford to be plagued by further discord and delay. Downtown and the world have witnessed what has happened when disputes drag on too long, as exemplified by the financial stand-off between developer Larry Silverstein and the Port Authority concerning the future office towers.

    We hope that the agreement will provide the impetus and framework for resolving the existing problems and preventing future stand-offs.

    Moving forward, Downtown community members and 9/11 families must also remain vigilant by holding the involved parties and politicians accountable for construction mishaps, cost overruns and other snags. Community Board 1, in particular, must continue to invite Port Authority and Memorial officials to its committee meetings for updates and answers.

    We strongly support the agreement to seek federal funding to cover a share of the estimated $60 million a year needed for operations. A proposed law, were it to pass through Congress, would oblige the federally-funded National Park Service to contribute $20 million annually to the memorial. Once the museum opens, the public should also chip in financially by paying a mandatory admission fee or making a donation at the door.

    Not everyone has faith in the settlement. A group of 9/11 families and firefighters is contesting the formation of an advisory board, which, according to the agreement, is meant to mitigate future disputes between the Port Authority and the 9/11 Memorial Museum. The group believes that the advisory board will precipitate years of fighting between the Port and the foundation board, and that the only viable solution is for the license of the memorial to be transferred from the memorial to the National Park Service.

    One constant that we have learned after 11 years of W.T.C. discussions and deliberations is that not everyone agrees.

    The Port Authority must now determine a realistic completion date for the museum. The date should allow for a modest degree of wiggle room so that, in the event of unforeseen delays, the agency doesn’t fall hopelessly behind its benchmark.

    Governors Cuomo and Christie, Mayor Bloomberg and the Port Authority must maintain the momentum of this agreement and assure its successful implementation. It is estimated that, once completed, the museum will attract two million visitors annually.

    Now is the time for the Port Authority to sprint toward the finish line.

  5. #20
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Floodwater Pours Into 9/11 Museum, Hampering Further Work on the Site

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP



    “It was shocking,” said Joseph C. Daniels, the president and chief executive of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum.

    He said he had gone to bed on Monday believing the museum was safe. He awakened on Tuesday to word that the site had flooded overnight. Later that day, he witnessed it himself from a balcony overlooking the enormous Foundation Hall on the main floor, now filled with thick, black water on which wood planks and other debris floated.

    Four days earlier, Mr. Daniels had been standing in the hall with members of the memorial foundation board, showing them renderings and explaining which displays would go where. Construction was finally resuming on the museum after the resolution of a protracted financing dispute between the foundation, of which Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is chairman, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is partly controlled by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo. The authority owns the World Trade Center site and is building the museum on behalf of the foundation.

    The view from the balcony showed water reaching almost to the top of the fire truck used by Engine Company 21 to respond to the attack in 2001, and the truck on which Ladder Company 3 arrived. A Fire Department ambulance was also surrounded with water. All three had been shrink-wrapped in plastic before they were installed in the museum. With the floodwaters still standing, there was no way on Friday to assess how much additional damage the already battered vehicles had sustained, or whether the plastic enclosure had protected them.

    The archipelago of partly submerged artifacts includes the last column of the original twin towers. This 58-ton piece, more than 36 feet high, was removed with funereal ceremony in May 2002 to symbolize the end of the first phase of recovery, the clearance of the World Trade Center site. It was then stored in a climate-controlled area of Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport while undergoing conservation. It is still in a climate-controlled enclosure, so its condition has not been assessed. Many of the personal effects that had been taped to the column were removed long ago for safekeeping. But the column is also covered in spray-painted graffiti from first responders, rescuers and recovery workers.

    The last column, the steel cross, the damaged vehicles and the so-called survivors’ stairway were all hoisted down into the subterranean museum during the early phases of construction. They could not have been moved in after the completion of the memorial plaza, which doubles as the museum rooftop.

    Mr. Daniels said Friday that the pumping out of the museum was “fully under way,” but that it was too early to say when construction might resume or, for that matter, when the Sept. 11 memorial might reopen to visitors.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/n...ex.jsonp&_r=1&

  6. #21

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    New York Times
    November 4, 2012

    Unfinished 9/11 Museum Is Flooded

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    The West Chamber of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in 2010, with the last column removed from the World Trade Center site after 9/11 visible at left, under wraps. About 70 feet below street level, the chamber was badly flooded.

    The main floor of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center is flooded with at least five feet of water.

    The extent of the damage is not clear. The most important and vulnerable of the artifacts on the floor is the last column left standing from the twin towers, which is covered with graffiti spray-painted by first responders, rescuers and recovery workers.

    A spokeswoman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which controls the trade center site, said Thursday that it was too early to tell how much of the last column was under water. The spokeswoman, Lisa MacSpadden, said officials “will have to assess once the pumping is complete.”

    Focused on the recovery efforts after Hurricane Sandy, officials from the Port Authority and the museum’s foundation would discuss the extent of flooding and possible damage.

    But because construction has been delayed by a protracted financing dispute between the Port Authority and the memorial foundation that was not resolved until Sept. 10, the museum is nowhere near completion.

    That means there may be a chance to build in measures to safeguard the collection and perhaps to rethink how many artifacts ought to be placed on the main floor, which is 68 feet below the memorial plaza.

    It could, in fact, become a laboratory for design in the face of extreme weather.

    “Our climate is changing,” Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said when he endorsed President Obama’s re-election last week. As chairman of the memorial foundation, and by extension the most senior executive of the museum, Mr. Bloomberg will have a chance to acknowledge that change on a tangible level.

    It was understood that a portion of the memorial was to be constructed in a 100-year flood plain — that is, an area of dry land with a 1 percent chance of flooding each year due to storms (and, therefore, a 100 percent chance of being flooded once a century).

    In the environmental impact statement of 2004, which acknowledged the flood risk, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation stated that “because the locational aspect of the event is paramount to the memorial itself, relocating the W.T.C. memorial is not practicable.”

    It did not seem conceivable then that a 100-year flood would occur during Hurricane Irene last year — before the museum’s opening day — and that a second disruptive storm would pass through 14 months later.

    “They call it the hundred-year flood because it’s only supposed to happen every hundred years,” Governor Cuomo said Tuesday after touring the flooded trade center. “I told President Obama, we have a hundred-year flood every two years.”

    Because of the way the museum space is threaded through the foundations of the World Trade Center, its main floor is actually the lowest. There, in what is called the West Chamber, stands an exposed section of the slurry wall that helped protect the trade center’s foundations from the naturally high water table around it.

    Besides the last column, several other significant artifacts are in place. They include the so-called survivors’ stairway that was a path to safety on Sept. 11, 2001; a cross-shaped steel beam, found in the ruins, at which rescue and recovery workers celebrated Mass; fire trucks used by Ladder Company 3 and Engine Company 21; and a damaged taxi cab.

    All but the very largest objects, like the stairway, have been under wraps and may have been spared any damage. But five feet of water would almost surely have touched, if not flooded, vitrines and display cases filled with the intimate and irreplaceable artifacts that have been donated, both spontaneously and in response to an acquisition campaign seeking photographs, videotapes, recovered property, clothing and other personal effects, workplace memorabilia, documents, letters, printed copies of e-mails, and diaries. The museum’s collection includes the radio used on the morning of 9/11 by Chief Peter J. Ganci, the highest-ranking Fire Department officer in uniform to die that day.

    Politics and nature have conspired to give museum officials a chance to think about how they will decide what they will display on the main floor and how they will safeguard those objects in any flood.


    The delicacy of the museum’s artifacts is exemplified by this small-scale Statue of Liberty, which stood outside a Midtown fire house and was covered in personal memorabilia.

    © 2012 The New York Times Company

  7. #22

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    Wall Street Journal
    November 11, 2012

    Protecting 9/11 Artifacts From Floods

    By JENNIFER MALONEY

    After superstorm Sandy inundated the 9/11 Museum and nearly submerged some of the massive artifacts in an under-construction exhibition space, officials are developing a plan to protect its most fragile and emotionally evocative items—photographs, missing-person posters, wallets, prayer cards and other keepsakes from victims.

    The Oct. 29 storm flooded the underground museum with more than 7 feet of water, causing small amounts of damage to large artifacts such as firetrucks, an ambulance and World Trade Center steel, including the "Last Column," which bears inscriptions from first responders, recovery workers and family members.

    Smaller, more delicate items were safe in off-site storage, but museum officials said the flood made them step back and take stock of their safety should another storm of Sandy's magnitude strike. These objects, which carry deep personal meaning for the family members who donated them, would be located below street level in one of the most flood-prone areas of the city, said Joe Daniels, president of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.

    "The World Trade Center site is in Zone A, and that's not going to change," he said. "What is our protocol and procedures for saving the most irreplaceable items?"

    When forecasters warn of a major storm, "Which ones can we take out, where do we put them, how do we remove them?" Mr. Daniels said. "We're looking at all of that right now."

    The 9/11 Museum was among several of the city's cultural institutions to be affected by Sandy. Others were hit much harder.

    The South Street Seaport Museum's tall ships weathered the storm, but its mechanical systems—escalator, elevator, heating and air conditioning—were all knocked out. Replacements are expected to cost millions, a "big, big blow" for the financially struggling museum, said Susan Henshaw Jones, the museum's director. She said she plans to install new equipment on a higher floor to protect it from future floods.

    New York City Opera's archives and musical scores were damaged by floodwaters in basement storage. Galleries in Chelsea have been working to salvage sodden artwork.

    The precautions now being contemplated at the 9/11 Museum are fraught with a heightened sense of urgency because much of its collection was donated by the families of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack victims.

    The museum has begun examining how floodwaters entered the exhibit space, and whether flooding can be prevented next time a dangerous storm hits. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which controls the World Trade Center site and is in charge of the museum's construction, also is looking at how to prevent flooding in the future.

    The museum's main exhibition space is seven stories beneath street level, and incorporates the foundations of the World Trade Center.

    The floodwater poured sideways into the museum from a vehicle screening center under construction just to the south of the museum, Port Authority officials said. The open site was vulnerable to Sandy's storm surge because it didn't have a roof, said Steve Plate, the Port Authority's director of World Trade Center construction.

    The World Trade Center site's design includes elements that should help protect against flooding, but the Port Authority is re-evaluating that design because of Sandy, Mr. Plate said through a spokesman. "As we continue our assessments, we will implement additional strategic flood-mitigation efforts," he said.

    One open question is whether the storm will further push back the museum's opening date. Officials who once hoped to launch the museum last September had to push the date back to late 2013 or early 2014 because of disputes between the mayor and the governors of New York and New Jersey over construction costs and control of the site. The storm did cause construction setbacks—some sheet rock will have to be torn out and replaced, and construction lifts were damaged. But the overall impact isn't clear.

    The 9/11 Memorial Plaza survived the storm virtually untouched, though the above-ground visitors center and security screening room were hard hit. The visitors center remains closed, but visitors are being allowed onto the plaza through a temporary screening center.

    The 9/11 Museum didn't have specific flood safeguards for the large artifacts in an underground exhibition space, but, having already survived the terrorist attack, they were durable. Firetrucks and an ambulance were shrink-wrapped to protect them from construction. The Last Column was inside a wooden enclosure that didn't keep the floodwater out. Though it previously was covered in mementos and posters, those had been removed and placed in storage, said Alice Greenwald, director of the museum.

    The damage to the large objects is minimal and can be reversed, she said. The vast majority of the water had been pumped out by last Monday. Conservators are now working to dehumidify the museum and clean off flash rusting and corrosion from the steel beams, she said. When she saw the Last Column for the first time after the flood, "I had tears in my eyes," Ms. Greenwald said.

    The personal messages scratched and drawn in marker were still there, "completely intact," she said. The high water mark rested just below the signatures of the city's Department of Design and Construction—the last group to sign the column.

    Copyright ©2012 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    They should maintain that high water mark on the column.

  9. #24

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    Only if it hasn't smudged the signatures inscribed on it, below the waterline.

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Even if some got smudged what are they going to do? Inscribe over them, to try and make it look like they're new and pristine? What's the point of that?

  11. #26

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    Wall Street Journal
    April 8, 2013

    9/11 Museum Exhibits Will Really Talk to Visitors

    By JENNIFER MALONEY

    Video


    As part of the planned exhibit at the 9/11 Memorial Museum, footage from Ground Zero is projected onto steel from the WTC facade.


    A rendering of an exhibit planned for the 9/11 Memorial Museum.

    When the 9/11 Memorial Museum opens next year, its first exhibit will be spare and elegant, enveloping visitors with the personal accounts of people from around the world describing where they were, and what they felt, on Sept. 11, 2001.

    Visitors will step through a collage of voices, speaking together in many languages: "I was in Honolulu, Hawaii." "I was in Cairo, Egypt." "On the Champs-Élysées in Paris." "São Paulo, Brazil." Panels will display maps fashioned from their words. "So angry." "So alone and lost." "Impossible, impossible, impossible."

    The collage suggests everyone has a story to tell about that day, even those thousands of miles away from New York. It is the brainchild of Local Projects, a New York design firm that is bringing high-tech, immersive and interactive exhibits to museums and other public spaces across the country.

    Local Projects was a collaborator on the algorithm that arranged the names at the 9/11 Memorial, and developed a new interactive exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art, which uses 3-D sensors and facial detection so visitors can mimic the pose of a statue or summon an artwork by displaying a facial expression.

    Now, the firm's founder, Jake Barton, is working on a range of projects in New York, from multimedia displays for the 9/11 Memorial Museum to kits for the New York Hall of Science that will turn playgrounds into physics labs.

    He is developing interactive exhibits for a planned children's museum in Harlem, the Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art and Storytelling, that will allow kids to archive their art and stories as they come back year after year. And he has proposed an idea for a renovated lobby at the New Victory Theater that would allow visitors to record their own stories of the first time they saw a play.

    The designers of the 9/11 Memorial Museum grappled with how to make a museum that speaks both to teenagers who were children at the time of the attacks and to people who ran from the burning towers, Mr. Barton said. The answer, he said: "Have the stories of one group talk to the other group."

    Mr. Barton, who is 40 years old, started out wanting to work as a set designer on Broadway. He worked for a set designer on shows in New York and elsewhere, then toyed with the idea of becoming a doctor. But a day job at a museum exhibition design firm made him realize, he said, that "I didn't need to be a doctor to make the world a better place." He enrolled in New York University's Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he earned a master's degree in computer science and art. He founded Local Projects before he graduated, in 2002. The firm employs 30 people.

    Mr. Barton's knack for using technology in the service of story-telling is what drew the museum to his firm, said Alice Greenwald, the 9/11 museum's director.

    "It is fundamentally, as Jake said, about human beings communicating with other human beings," she said. "To me, that's what this museum is about."

    In addition to "We Remember," the first exhibit visitors will pass through, Local Projects has designed audiovisual displays exploring the experiences of those who were inside the towers when the planes struck; first responders who ran into the towers; and recovery workers who toiled for months on the pile, searching first for survivors and then for human remains.

    Museum officials said that for the opening exhibit, they didn't want to present a single, authoritative voice of a curator or historian but rather acknowledge that events of Sept. 11 were witnessed by millions of people around the globe who watched the repeated broadcasts of the footage on television. "We're simply saying, 'We know you know,'" Ms. Greenwald said.

    Instead of telling visitors what happened that day, the museum is designed to help visitors explore their own memories and make sense of the events and their global consequences.

    Mr. Barton said he hopes the museum will help visitors grapple with difficult questions: "How has the world changed? What have we learned?"

    The exhibits will evolve over time, he said. The National September 11 Memorial & Museum continues to gather 9/11 stories through a toll-free number.

    One intensely emotional presentation will play a montage of voices of people who were inside the World Trade Center when the planes hit. They describe the smoke, the chaos, their attempts to escape. The voice collage includes recordings of 911 calls and voicemail recordings left for friends and family, used with permission.

    For another display, Mr. Barton proposed projecting footage of the recovery effort onto a piece of steel from the facade of the World Trade Center shaped like a trident.

    Ms. Greenwald was initially skeptical. But she and other museum officials in 2010 trekked out to a hangar at John F. Kennedy International Airport, where the steel was housed, to see a mock-up of his idea.

    The trident lay flat. Onto it, Mr. Barton's team projected footage of bucket lines at Ground Zero shot by the U.S. Department of Labor. Layered over the footage was a radio interview with a sculptor explaining that he volunteered because he knew how to use a blow torch. "It was almost as if, for me, that the steel was telling its own story," Ms. Greenwald said.

    Copyright ©2013 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  12. #27
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    I don't think I could ever go to that place. It sounds too depressing.

  13. #28

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    Curbed
    April 22, 2013

    Here's What's Inside The Long-Delayed 9/11 Museum

    By Hana R. Alberts


    (RBudhu on Flickr)

    After flooding from Hurricane Sandy, funding debates and many other delays, the 9/11 Museum will finally open in about a year. 60 Minutes got a first look inside the National September 11 Memorial Museum, located seven stories below the memorial plaza, where the two fountains in the shape of the towers' imprints, surrounded by victims' names, stand. From this hard-hat video tour and interviews with board members, it emerges that the museum not only provides detailed information about the events of that day but also lays bare emotion-laden portrayals of the victims, recovery workers, and even the perpetrators.



    Visitors will start by descending into the belly of the towers, past two 50-ton beams recovered from the wreckage, and will enter a room with columns of LED lights that resonates with voices of people all over the world talking about where they were when they heard about the attacks. Many of the exhibits contain large-scale artifacts; at one point visitors will descend alongside a staircase that many used as an escape route, and there will be a fire engine used on the day that had to be lowered in through the roof by a crane. The last column to be dismantled, covered in sentimental graffiti, will be spotlighted.



    "Most museums are buildings that house artifacts," says museum director Alice Greenwald. "We're a museum in an artifact." Greenwald and others talk about the challenges involved, like cordoning off areas that are sensitive and graphic, for example, the part with images of those who tried to jump to escape. Voicemail messages left by people in the towers and on planes will be used sparingly and with permission.



    There will be a sizable tribute to the victim's lives, with interactive, searchable panels containing photos and remembrances by family and friends of more than 3,000 of them. Visitors will be able to call up profiles of each person, or search by birthplace or company, like hardest-hit Cantor Fitzgerald. There will be references to the terrorists (it's a controversial issue, but the museum board ultimately decided that visitors, especially children who won't remember the event, needed to leave knowing who did this), as well as areas devoted to recovery workers and volunteers of all stripes. If the sneak preview is such a tearjerker, we're sure the whole thing will be, too, when it opens in 2014.

  14. #29

  15. #30

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    The MEMO Blog
    May 2, 2013

    Brick from Compound Where bin Laden was Killed Enters Museum Collection

    By Alex Drakakis


    A brick from Osama bin Laden’s fortified compound removed by a Fox News Channel war correspondent after the al-Qaeda leader’s death in 2011. (photo by Matt Flynn)

    One of the most dramatic manhunts in history culminated some two years ago, with the death of Osama bin Laden, the nation’s most wanted criminal who redefined the threat of global terrorism in the 21st century with his call for a violent jihad uprising against the United States.

    Symbolizing the defining moment of his fall is an unassuming object, a brick extricated from the foundation of bin Laden’s fortified compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, raided by U.S. Navy SEALs who killed the long-sought-after terrorist.

    The compound served as bin Laden’s safe house for at least five years before his detection and killing. President Obama addressed the nation about his death on May 1, 2011. Stationed in Islamabad several years before the daring mission, Fox News Channel war correspondent Dominic DiNatale was on the scene in Abbottabad soon after the U.S. special forces raid on the compound, returning often to the site to chronicle local reaction to this international event.

    The compound remained intact for nearly a year. When DiNatale learned that Pakistani authorities planned to raze the three-story structure in late February 2012, he returned to chisel out several bricks from its foundation. He presented one to Fox News colleagues in New York City as a souvenir of their collective efforts to cover the story of the al-Qaeda network and its mastermind’s mysterious disappearance and eventual capture. In 2013, DiNatale visited the 9/11 Memorial Museum’s offices in New York City, where he presented the brick and donated it to the museum collection.

    For many, the brick represents the fall of bin Laden’s reign of terror; a storied piece of solitary rubble denoting renewal of life in a world in which he no longer remains at large.

    © 2013 National September 11 Memorial & Museum

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