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Thread: The New York Wheel - by Starneth

  1. #61

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    JetBlue Stadium for Jets and Giants, MetLife Field for the Mets, Citi Park for the new soccer team, New York City FC. In a perfect world. Also in a perfect world, just let Staten Island take the name of the wheel.

  2. #62

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    In a perfect world this wheel would not happen...

  3. #63
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post

    Pretty...sorry.


  4. #64
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    Interesting. With flexible LED ribbon panels and a competent computer programmer, they should be able to make the light pattern continuous and avoid the dark regions on the supports

  5. #65
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Staten Island Awaits Giant Ferris Wheel, Transformation


    The waterfront of St. George, in north Staten Island, may soon be transformed by a 630 foot ferris wheel and New York City's first outlet mall.
    All photos by Nathan Kensinger.

    For over 130 years, the shoreline of northern Staten Island has been a quiet place to contemplate the New York harbor. Little has changed here since 1878, when a reporter from the New York Times wandered through the "nooks on the North Shore" and found an "untidy water front" with inspiring views of New Jersey industry. Today, this same shoreline is still populated by solitary wanderers—beach combers, local fishermen, sunbathers, wild geese—who watch the tugboats ply the Kill Van Kull. But this isolation could soon be a thing of the past, as the city moves forward with several megaprojects that will transform the area by luring millions of visitors out of the Staten Island Ferry terminal.

    In St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry comes to land, the waterfront is slated for a major redevelopment that includes the New York Wheel, a 60-story ferris wheel that "will accommodate up to 1,440 people per ride." Alongside this behemoth will be Empire Outlets, a "1,000,000-Square-Foot Complex" with "100 Designer Outlet Shops and a 200-Room Hotel." These two projects will replace a pair of parking lots that flank the Staten Island Yankees ballpark. Despite the promise of jobs and shopping opportunities, not all local residents are looking forward to these developments, or to the crowds they will bring. "That's going to create havoc in Staten Island," said Kenny Taclay, a lifelong resident of the North Shore. "They don't think about the traffic. It's going to be horrendous over here."

    For small business owners on the St. George waterfront, these projects raise difficult questions about the future. "I've been here 23, 24 years," said Max, the owner of M&M Deli, which is located across from the proposed ferris wheel site. "All this news does is raise people's rent." For Max and other business owners nearby, megaprojects have not always translated into hordes of new customers. After the ballpark opened up down the street in 2001, several local stores were closed down or sold off. "The only business the ballpark gave was to the ballpark," said Max, who will miss the old waterfront. "It's kind of sad, with the scarcity of land, that everything has to be commercialized so much."


    This parking lot, a former brownfield that was once home to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad yards,
    is slated to become the ferris wheel, with a ground breaking planned for 2014.


    At water's edge, a park designed by HM White provides panoramic views of the
    Kill Van Kull and New Jersey's industrial shoreline.


    The park is a haven for wild geese. "I used to hop the trains over here," recalls lifelong resident Kenny Taclay.
    "This was all railroad tracks. Then one day they decided to knock it down."


    The park's esplanade was damaged during Hurricane Sandy. "The water went underneath," said local resident John Donlon.
    "Everything just fell right in. That's the way it is. It's on an island."


    "Postcards," a September 11th memorial designed by Masayuki Sono, provides
    another location for quiet contemplation of the waterfront.


    "It's a nice place to enjoy the sun," said a fisherman near the memorial.
    "Last week I caught five striped bass and a sand shark."


    Looking inland from the esplanade provides a sense of the scale for the ferris wheel,
    which will tower above these St. George residences. "It's going to be a big thing staring at you,"
    said Kenny Taclay. "Who wants that now? People on the ferris wheel staring at you."


    On Richmond Terrace, near the redevelopment location, historic homes sit next to empty lots.
    "It might change the whole area—for the good," said resident John Donlon.
    "They need it here on this side of the island. It's pretty barren."


    This building site on Richmond Terrace has been abandoned for many years.
    "So many projects have come up over the years, and nothing really happens," said Max,
    the owner of M&M Deli. "I hope good things happen to the neighborhood—I've been waiting long enough."


    Further up the hill in St. George, the homes begin to grow in stature.
    "This used to be a tropical paradise for the rich," said John Donlon.


    At the top of the hill, multistory homes face the area where the ferris wheel is scheduled to be built.
    "I don't like it. I don't like the ferris wheel," said one hilltop resident. "That's all I have to say about that."


    The unimpeded view from these hilltop mansions has remained essentially the same since the 1800's,
    looking out onto "the horizon of 20 miles of cities," according to the Times, and allowing residents to
    "contemplate its vastness and glory without its pettiness and squalor."

    Nathan Kensinger

    Nathan Kensinger [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...ation.php#more

  6. #66

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    World's tallest ferris wheel is being built in Vegas



    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-1...ondon-eye.html

  7. #67
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    it took me a few seconds to find it

  8. #68

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    Also featuring support pillars of SkyVue, an even taller wheel.

  9. #69
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    with all these copycat urban Ferris Wheels, they lose their uniqueness which was the impetus to build them in the first place

  10. #70

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    Waterfront wheel, mall project up in the air

    Councilwoman, unions pressing retail developer on jobs


    Thornton McEnery
    SHoP Architects
    Without City Council action, $580 million in projects would be rendered moot.
    Published: October 20, 2013 - 12:01 am
    The world's tallest observation Ferris wheel is rolling toward Staten Island with an expansive outlet center in tow, but the debate over who will build the retail component threatens to derail both projects.
    With the Bloomberg administration having linked the New York Wheel and Empire Outlets shopping center into the same land-use application, the projects will now share a fate when the City Council decides the matter Oct. 30.
    Approval on such projects typically hinges on the say-so of the local council member, in this case first-term Democrat Debi Rose. The councilwoman has been enigmatic in her deliberations, laying out a lengthy list of demands—most important, labor agreements guaranteeing union construction jobs.
    The retail component's developer, BFC Partners, says the mall's projected rents aren't high enough to fund a 100% union project and that it couldn't get financing to build it under those circumstances.
    But Ms. Rose would like to satisfy the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York, which represents trade unions seeking to construct Empire Outlets.
    "I have a wish list of about 25 items," Ms. Rose told the Staten Island Advance. "And there are some items on my list that, if I don't sort of get a green light on, they are deal-breakers."
    Ms. Rose would not discuss her stance with Crain's, instead referring to an Oct. 2 statement in which she emphasized local hiring. In it, she characterized the negotiations as "complex and sensitive" and stated that she intends to "ensure that Islanders get the best deal possible," one that would require "jobs to come to Staten Island for Staten Islanders—pre-, during, and post-construction."
    'STARK CONTRAST'

    Local hiring cannot be guaranteed as part of the city's approval, but there are programs that would facilitate it. Ms. Rose could also be swayed by an argument that union-only construction would limit local hiring because union tradespeople tend to live beyond Staten Island.
    For Ms. Rose to sign off, she will likely need concessions from BFC and the Trades Council. The current tone, however, is not promising. It doesn't help BFC that the wheel next door would be built entirely by union workers.
    "What we have here is a stark contrast between one project doing and saying the right things and another that is not," said a Trades Council spokesman. "The New York Wheel has taken all the steps to provide the right kind of jobs and training, while Empire Outlets has said that they are willing to make about 12% of just the infrastructure phase union-[built]."
    The union group contends that because the 16-acre projects would use city land, it is an ethical necessity for the Empire Outlets developer to offer more union jobs, replete with health coverage and job training.
    "We understand that an inclusive job plan with organized labor is important," said Donald Capoccia, owner of BFC Partners, "and I pledge that every effort will be made to ensure these work opportunities be offered to Staten Islanders—be it through organized labor, local subcontractors or direct hiring."
    Noting his more than eight years of investing on Staten Island's North Shore, Mr. Capoccia cited the area's high unemployment and emphasized that his project would generate 1,200 construction jobs and 1,000 permanent jobs. For the unions, the number of jobs is not the point, but rather the quality of those jobs and who will get them.
    "We're not going to do a project-labor agreement on less than 15% of just the first phase," cautioned the Trades Council representative, referring to a site-specific collective-bargaining agreement for the initial stage of work. "We also need the second phase to be full of good, union jobs."
    According to Mr. Capoccia, such demands are unworkable given the finances of his $260 million development.
    4M VISITORS EXPECTED

    SHoP Architects
    An outlet mall would not be built entirely with union labor, unlike the proposed Ferris wheel nearby, because the higher cost would make the project uneconomical, the mall developer says.
    "The project economics simply do not allow for a PLA that would cover 100% of the construction-trade work," he said. "However, there is an opportunity to involve the trade unions in the project, and we have offered a PLA with a value of $25 million to $30 million."
    The upscale mall would draw 4 million visitors annually and compete with Woodbury Common Premium Outlets in Orange County, N.Y., which draws city tourists by the busload. The Ferris wheel would draw from the ferry's annual ridership of 2 million, including many tourists who don't currently venture into the neighborhood. The Ferris wheel would open in 2016 and the outlets a year later.
    DEVELOPMENT AT RISK

    The danger for Ms. Rose in playing hardball is the risk of losing what would be Staten Island's most significant development in decades. Combined, the projects represent $580 million in private investment. In 2006, citing traffic concerns, Staten Island politicians rejected a $350 million NASCAR racetrack proposal. If the council does not approve the wheel and mall projects in the next two weeks, city rules require developers to start from scratch, which could take years.
    It is not uncommon for council deals to be reached in the eleventh hour, but if Ms. Rose sides against the projects, it is conceivable that her colleagues could approve them anyway, as they are said to have broad support. While the council is historically union-friendly, it might not be inclined to pass up the biggest redevelopment of the St. George waterfront since the 1884 completion of the Staten Island Ferry terminal.
    Mr. Capoccia's 1 million-square-foot project, which also includes parking garages and a 200-unit hotel, was paired with the Ferris wheel because the city's Economic Development Corp. views the two as complementary.
    "As symbiotic components of a single transformative project, the New York Wheel and Empire Outlets will bring hundreds of millions of dollars of investment and thousands of much-needed jobs to Staten Island," an EDC spokeswoman said. "Together, the wheel and outlets will draw visitors and New Yorkers alike to experience the vibrant cultural and community energy already present on the St. George waterfront."

  11. #71

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    The world's tallest observation Ferris wheel is rolling toward Staten Island...
    isn't the "tallest" a misnomer at this point?

  12. #72

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    I still say this rendering makes it look too teetery, but whatever.

    Wheel-ing and dealing: Giant amusement ride to get built on Staten Island


    The New York City Council approved construction of one of the largest Ferris wheels in the world, as long as only union labor is hired.


    By Mara Gay / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS


    Thursday, October 31, 2013, 12:06 AM





    Uncredited/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    This is what the approved 625-foot Ferris wheel planned for the Staten Island waterfront might look like once it's built.




    It’s wheely big.
    The plan to build one of the largest Ferris wheels in the world on Staten Island was approved by the New York City Council on Wednesday.


    Uncredited/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    What a view: The top of the approved Staten Island Ferris wheel will let riders gaze far and wide.


    RELATED: NEW YORK WHEEL PLANS ROLLING FORWARD ON STATEN ISLAND
    “This is the biggest thing that ever happened to the north shore of Staten Island,” said Councilwoman Deborah Rose, a Democrat.
    The 625-foot Ferris wheel and an adjoining megamall slated to be built next to the amusement ride were approved after lawmakers agreed to use only union labor on the entire development.



    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...#ixzz2jM0Uu3tv

  13. #73
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    Not sure why it hasn't been made illegal yet to force union requirements on government contracts. That's not in the best interests of taxpayers and IMO a brazen violation of fiduciary responsibilities

  14. #74
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    It's part of the negotiations, where both sides agree. Nothing forced.

  15. #75

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    This is great news. This area is a dump, yet it is in such a potentially beautiful location. It would be nice if tons of affordable condos (e.g., $300/sf) and rentals are built here. In Chicago, nice condos in the heart of the city are $300/sf.

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