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Thread: Hurricane Sandy--THE Perfect Storm?

  1. #46
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Ortley beach....

    11 years of work to fix the place up. They finally finished this year.....

    Now my father is camped out on the other side of the closed bridge waiting to get in to have a look.

    Further north, the island was cut in two at a bridge crossing point, joining the bay to the ocean.

    This is so bad.

  2. #47

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    Good slide show here....mostly 'breezy point' and Long Island.

    http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/new...-breezy-point/

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    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Could These Giant Plugs Have Prevented NYC Subways from Flooding During Hurricane Sandy?

    by Yuka Yoneda



    The Department of Homeland Security came up with these giant inflatable plugs as a way to stop terrorist attacks in underground tunnels, but to many New Yorkers who waited on bus lines for 2 hours today, they look like massive coulda, woulda, shouldas. It’s important to point out that the 32-by-16-foot plugs are just prototypes for now and, according to Department of Homeland Security project manager John Fortune, were not ready to be deployed at the time Hurricane Sandy hit New York City this week. Still, the plug’s developers feel that things could have been done differently to speed up the process, and everyone in New York of course, wishes they had.



    If the plugs had been ready this week, they could have been placed in subway tunnels and inflated, keeping water out like enormous bathtub stoppers. Some at ILC Dover, the company that manufactures the plugs, felt that if more had been done to get the plugs to a usable stage, they could have been used to stop flooding in NYC subway tunnels this week. “We’ve proved that these plugs can hold back water,” said Dave Cadogan of ILC Dover, which also makes spacesuits and blimp bodies. “I wish we had moved a little bit faster as a team and had gotten this development done.”

    Cagodan is referring to a test that was performed in January, where the Department of Homeland Security used a 16-foot diameter prototype to hold back pressurized water in a test tunnel in Morgantown, West Virginia. They are planning to run a similar test to demonstrate the plug’s reliability next week.

    The existing 32″ x 16″ plugs can hold 35,000 gallons of water and developers told CNN that if they’d been placed at the end of some of the tunnels under the East River, could have prevented water from gushing into the subway system. However, they also added that the plugs wouldn’t have been able to control water coming through other sources like porous underground subway stations. And the bottom line is that while we certainly wish the Department of Homeland Security had foreseen their possible use as flood barriers, the plugs just weren’t ready yet.

    But that doesn’t mean that they can’t be ready for the next time NYC faces a super storm like Sandy, because in all likelihood, it will.

    http://inhabitat.com/nyc/could-these...rricane-sandy/

  4. #49

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    Insight: Flooded New York plans to tame the sea, but who pays?


    1:13am EDT
    By Greg Roumeliotis
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - When Jeroen Aerts, a Dutchman tasked with crafting a plan to defend New York City from flooding, first looked at its coastline seven years ago, he was taken aback by how vulnerable it was.

    Unlike some of the other large cities around the world, such as London and Amsterdam, that have comprehensive flood defense systems with levees and storm surge barriers, New York was completely at the mercy of the elements.

    "I was looking at the water and wondering - where are the levees?" said Aerts, a professor of environmental risk management at the VU University in Amsterdam and an adviser to New York City. "Nobody was doing anything on flood risk."

    As the devastation after super storm Sandy this week made all too clear, little progress has been made since Aerts first looked at the Atlantic Ocean from New York's shores. The storm caused widespread flooding, power outages, travel chaos and left more than 40 people dead in New York City. Early estimates predict it also caused up to $18 billion in economic losses in New York state alone.

    New York state and city officials have started talking about the need for a comprehensive flood defense system, but many obstacles remain. According to Aerts' top estimate, it could cost as much as $29 billion to build and implement. The question of who will pay for it remains unresolved.

    Most comprehensive proposals for storm surge defenses involve a system of two to four barriers, each spanning from a third of a mile to six miles and towering about 30 feet above sea level. This is to be supplemented by levees, dikes, bulkheads and beach strengthening.

    One of the most prominent plans calls for a 0.84-mile East River storm surge barrier from Whitestone in Queens to Throgs Neck Bridge in the Bronx, and a much longer 5.92-mile Outer Harbor barrier linking Sandy Hook in New Jersey to the Rockaway Peninsula in Long Island.

    Aerts estimates storm surge barriers could cost between $10 billion to $17 billion, while additional defenses such as levees and adding sand to eroding beaches could cost another $10 billion to $12 billion.

    Even if the city were to find that kind of money, an infrastructure project on such a scale can take more than eight years to build, which means New Yorkers would be exposed to the fury of any such storm in the meantime.

    As shown in the past week, the city's current strategy is to take precautions - such as evacuations from areas that flood easily - then take the hit and try to recover as best as it can.

    "The city's approach is something that they call 'resilience'. If they are hit by a storm and they have flooding there will be damage but after the storm they can clean up... kind of repairing the damage after it's happening, bouncing back," said Malcolm Bowman, an oceanography professor at Long Island's Stony Brook University. "Obviously it is not enough."

    New York City and state officials did not respond to a request for comment on the question of flood barriers. A city spokesperson also did not respond to a request to comment on the significance of Aerts's role. The city will occasionally tap advisers to carry out research.
    WHO PAYS
    To many New Yorkers, Sandy's destruction came as a shock. But to scientists, engineers, environmentalists and public officials, this was a tragedy waiting to happen. A 2007 study by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development ranked greater New York second among the world's large port cities most exposed to coastal flooding based on the value of their property.

    "People have said for many years - specifically since Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans - that New York City was prone to such a super storm," New York City Comptroller John Liu said on Thursday.

    Still it took Hurricane Irene in August last year for the city to seriously start exploring a flood plan, according to Aerts, who said the city asked him to develop a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis for a flood strategy.

    After Sandy, the momentum behind such a plan is set to build. Andrew Cuomo, governor of New York state, said this week that infrastructure will need to be re-examined and reinforced.
    But it is not clear how New York will pay for it, and it may well take an act of Congress to prevent the next act of God from bringing the world's financial center to its knees again.
    "We have to weigh our damages against the cost of building such a levee system," said Liu.

    On paper, New York City has the capacity to borrow more to spend on infrastructure. The latest relevant report from Comptroller Liu's office projects the city to be $18.28 billion below its general debt limit by July 2013 and $18.74 billion by July 2014.

    "I don't see tight debt capacity as a hurdle down the road," said George Friedlander, chief municipal strategist at Citigroup Inc.
    But the city's government is likely to be loath to jeopardize its strong credit in the municipal bond markets. It will have to clinch a deal with the state, the federal government, as well as other states vested in this, particularly New Jersey, at a time when relations between Democrats and Republicans are highly polarized.

    "When we saved New York City from bankruptcy thirty years ago, Governor (Hugh) Carey got people together and made them understand they were better off talking to each other," said Wall Street veteran Felix Rohatyn, currently a special adviser to Kenneth M. Jacobs, CEO at the Lazard investment bank. "I'm worried this is something we cannot do today."

    FEDERAL MONEY

    Federal money may prove key to any major flood protection program. This would mean negotiating funds with Congress rather than relying on the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which reimburses states and cities for recovery projects. And getting that kind of money is going to be increasingly difficult given the lack of consensus in Washington on how to handle the U.S. government's large budget deficit and soaring debt.

    "We have to get a long-term commitment from the federal government to put money up, which can be contingent on the state and local governments producing a significant match," said former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell.

    Rendell, a major advocate of private sector involvement in infrastructure finance, argued that public-private partnerships could be part of the funding mix for such projects.
    Even though something like levees would be not be revenue-generating, private ownership or management was still an option, said Raj Agrawal, head of infrastructure for North America at investment firm KKR & Co LP.

    "If you get this under private ownership or private operation, you can certainly raise more capital than you could in the bond market by getting a capital infusion of funds from a private party," he said.

    POLITICAL DECISIONS

    In Europe, the Delta Works in the Netherlands, as well as the Thames Barrier in Britain, were both kicked off after the North Sea Flood of 1953 and are early examples of how major storms can result in significant infrastructure investments.

    The United States has not always been quick off the mark in erecting such defenses. Storm surge barriers off Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts were constructed in the 1960s as a result of a hurricane in 1938, said Graeme Forsyth, a technical director at engineering consultancy Halcrow.

    "The design may take two years, the construction might take six, and the rest of it is more to do with getting the ball rolling politically, getting the funding in place and all that kind of thing," said Forsyth, whose firm is behind a storm surge barrier for St. Petersburg, Russia, that cost $6.9 billion.

    Still, construction of the storm surge barrier in New Orleans was completed in 2011 - just six years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city.

    "My experience in other countries with this kind of project is that these are political decisions. If the population is in favor of it, then a politician will say we'll go for it. ... Now we have momentum," said Aerts.

    Some skeptics argue that barriers and other large-scale infrastructure projects are not cost-effective because they protect only specific areas.

    "There is too much coastline. In a funny kind of way you can protect one area at the expense of another. I don't think huge capital infrastructure like that is going to be constructive," said Steven Cohen, a professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

    Aerts, though, says he is producing an estimate for the cost of barriers to give to the city's government.

    "In the short-term you can look at existing building codes to make sure that they are maintained. In the longer term, the barriers come into play," Aerts said.
    (Reporting by Greg Roumeliotis in New York; Additional reporting by Hilary Russ in New York; Editing by Paritosh Bansal, Martin Howell, Doina Chiacu)

    © Thomson Reuters 2011. All rights reserved.

  5. #50
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens

    The MTA released photos on its Flickr account page showing how they are using a ‘pump train’ to remove some 30 inches of water from the A/C train’s Cranberry Street Tunnel and the E/M train’s 53rd Street Tunnel, which connect Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens.

    By Victoria Cavaliere


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit
    New York City Transit employees pump water out of the Cranberry Street Tunnel, which carries the A and C trains between Brooklyn and Manhattan underneath the East River.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit
    The 'pump train' siphons water out of the Cranberry Street Tunnel.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit
    As service is restored, crews must examine 600 miles of track and the electrical systems throughout the system.

    https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york...sEnabled=false

  6. #51

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    That is one terrific set of photos, thanks Bingo. Every photo so clear, crisp, and intimate: 'almost' like a being there.

  8. #53
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    In Sight of Manhattan Skyline, Living Forlorn and in the Dark

    By SARAH MASLIN NIR



    Watching the Manhattan skyline shimmer over Jamaica Bay had always been one of the charms of life in the Rockaways. But now, when the Empire State Building winks on each night, those lights feel almost like a punch in the gut.

    It felt that way to the two women caked in the sandy silt that still blankets most streets here, as they trudged up Rockaway Beach Boulevard on Saturday, pushing shopping carts they had dug out of wreckage piled beside the boarded-up C-Town Supermarket.

    The women, Monique Arkward and her neighbor Eyvette Martin, pushed the carts more than 40 blocks from their battered bungalows to St. Francis de Sales Church, where they had heard — by word of mouth, since phones hardly work here — that they might find bottled water, batteries and some measure of warmth.

    “We’re living like cavemen,” Ms. Arkward said. “It’s like we’re forgotten. It’s like they say, ‘O.K., when we get to them, we’ll get to them.’ ”

    The Rockaways, a narrow peninsula of working-class communities in Queens, have become one of the epicenters for the simmering sense of abandonment felt in still-darkened areas of New York City, and out into the suburbs and beyond, including large swaths of New Jersey and Long Island, where the lack of power was made more problematic by persistent gas shortages.

    Around the city, particularly in places already sensitive to the afterthought status conveyed in the Manhattan-centric characterization “outer boroughs,” the accusations of neglect seemed colored by a growing belief that the recovery from Hurricane Sandy has cleaved along predictable class lines. That sentiment was captured in a much-publicized street-corner confrontation over the weekend when residents shrieked their frustrations at Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg as he visited the Rockaways on Saturday.

    “It’s all about Manhattan,” said Nora McDermott, who lives in the Rockaways, as she stood in a relief center on Saturday. “It was unbelievable, to see Manhattan get power,” she said. “Was I surprised they got it quicker? Not really. But I was like, ‘Damn.’ ”

    Echoes of that thought abounded in places like Red Hook in Brooklyn, Gerritsen Beach in Brooklyn, and New Dorp Beach on Staten Island, where thousands are struggling to rebuild their lives without electricity — and, residents insisted with growing vehemence, sufficient help from leaders — even as the rest of the city powers up and moves on.

    At the Red Hook Houses, a public housing complex of nearly 3,000 apartments, power was still out on Sunday.

    For almost a week now, Mario Davila, 64, who is in a wheelchair and lives on the third floor of one building, has eased his way downstairs for cigarettes and food from Meals on Wheels, a step at a time, one hand on the railing and one on his chair, and then waited for his brother to help him crawl back up. Across the East River, he knew, the elevators were once again ferrying passengers.

    Mr. Davila said he wished they were as lucky as those residents.

    As the storm sent the waters of Shell Bank Creek on the westernmost edge of Jamaica Bay overflowing into Gerritsen Beach last Monday night, Jennifer Avena, 35, and her three children and Labrador mix swam nearly 10 blocks through chest-deep water to refuge at Resurrection Church.

    A week later, she still felt on her own, as she photographed the contents of her house on Sunday, throwing out each destroyed item.

    Her own neighbors, Ms. Avena said, were the few who were helping.

    Tensions also remained high across Staten Island, where the storm’s impact was particularly deadly and where criticism of the official response has been vocal. Though electricity had been restored to 160,000 customers, according to Consolidated Edison, another 19,000 remained without power.

    “We’ve made good progress,” said John Miksad, Con Ed’s senior vice president for electric operations. “But I know for those 19,000 customers that are still out, it’s misery.”

    In New Dorp Beach, mounds — some as high as 10 feet — of debris, vintage dolls, mattresses, photographs, teddy bears and Christmas decorations piled outside nearly every home on Sunday, awaiting dump trucks. The roar of generators filled the air.

    John Ryan, 47, had salvaged just two books from his collection. He bristled at the mayor’s assertion that the city is edging back to normalcy. “It’s completely unrealistic,” Mr. Ryan said. “I think he should go house to house and see what the war zone is like.”

    But down the block, Orlando Vogler, 26, had a different sentiment. As he stood next to a bonfire fueled by pieces of his destroyed furniture, he said that the situation had improved over the weekend. “It’s finally starting to come together,” he said. “Now you see hundreds of volunteers coming down the street.”

    In New Jersey, Matt Doherty, the mayor of Belmar, described the conditions as “third world.” He said the borough of roughly 6,000 year-round residents was in need of more blankets and “heavy duty” clothing.

    “We’re in the Dark Ages here. It’s really back to basics,” he said Sunday. “It’s almost like camping outside in November. People are doubled up in blankets, sweaters, sweatshirts, socks. Residents are living in their living rooms, sleeping in front of their fireplaces.”

    Every one of the over 115,000 residents of the Rockaways and Broad Channel is still without power, according to the Long Island Power Authority, which services those areas. And it will be several more days before the seawater-soaked substations along the Rockaway Peninsula are repaired or a workaround is in place. The substations power neighborhoods like Belle Harbor and Breezy Point, a community largely of firefighters and police officers where over 110 houses burned down on Monday night.

    But even once the substations are repaired, each flooded house must be certified on a case-by-case basis by a licensed electrician before it is deemed safe to flip the switch, said Lois Bentivegna, a LIPA spokeswoman.

    Even though some residents acknowledged the risks of living along the ocean, the contrast between Manhattan’s thrumming power lines and the snail’s pace of recovery was hard to bear.

    At an American Legion hall in Broad Channel, Paul Girace, 66, stewed as he ate a meal of bow-tie pasta and canned beans provided by relief workers on Saturday.

    “They got electricity already?” Mr. Girace said. “It’s par for the course. Who is the population of Manhattan? The wealthy people. Who screams in Bloomberg’s ear? The wealthy people.”

    George Wright, 61, agreed. “You know Manhattan is going to get turned on first, because let’s face it, this city operates from Manhattan,” he said. “They can dry that out and get it going.

    Over here, it got ripped to pieces.”

    Near Shore Front Parkway, Bobbi Cooke, 51, and her sister Gwen Murphy, 62, who are caring for their disabled sister in a darkened apartment, had run through their stash of lighters, batteries and candles.

    Without electricity, Ms. Cooke said, they could not use A.T.M.’s to get money to buy what little food was available.

    But what she said she was most desperate for were answers.

    “Since the day it happened, and afterwards, we’ve all had to fend for our selves,” Ms. Cooke said. “We need to know when we’re going to have gas, light, electric. Everywhere is getting something but us.”

    “We’re totally knocked out of the world,” she said.

    Ms. Murphy joined in. “We’re like an orphan,” she said. “It’s like we don’t even exist.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/05/n...pagewanted=all

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  10. #55
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    A bit of where my folks have a place down at "Ortley Beach"

    http://soc.li/s8PDRHZ

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    NH, on News12NJ today it was reported that NJ residents of the barrier islands and peninsula, will be allowed back today and tomorrow, between 8-3 to retrieve personal items, documents, etc. No children, no pets, and first you have to register at a temporary center on the mainland, which for Ortley I'm pretty sure is Brick. Provide proof of residence, license, whatever, & they give you a placard for your windshield. After those two days, no one will be allowed back for 6-8 months, because they have to repair or replace gas lines. That doesn't even include rebuilding. Damn.

    I saw a before/after pic yesterday of the peninsula, down the center which, like a spine, runs Rte 35, the only uninterrupted road all the way down to IBSP. The foot of the Mantoloking bridge that was wiped out, runs into Rte 35 which was also washed out, so besides Rte 37 over the bridge, there is no other way in. Every time I think I've seen the worst of it, more pops up. Just unbelievable.

  12. #57
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Thanks.

    I will pass the information on to my parents.

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    Edited

    OMG what a great story!

    Amazing story of survival after Toms River man leaves ‘farewell’ note


    By Ron Recinto | The Lookout – 4 hrs ago


    (WOBM)
    A Toms River, N.J., man who didn't think he would survive Sandy's storm surge, broke into a stranger's house and left a farewell note asking her to "tell my Dad I love him."
    Thankfully the letter writer, identified only as Mike, was reunited with his father, Tony. And both will have a lifetime to retell his tale of survival.
    So will Christine Treglia, who found this unsettling note when she returned home, which she had evacuated before the storm:
    Who ever reads this I'm DIEING — I'm 28 yrs old my name is Mike. I had to break in to your house. I took blankets off the couch. I have hypothermia. I didn't take any thing. A wave thru me out of my house down the block. I don't think I'm going to make it. The water outside is 10ft deep at least. There's no res[c]ue.
    Tell my dad I love him and I tryed get[t]ing out. His number is ###-###-#### his name is Tony. I hope u can read this I'm in the dark. I took a black jacket too. Goodbye. God all mighty help me.
    Treglia posted this response on Facebook along with a link to the story about the note:
    "This was my house that Mike found refuge in. We found this letter and 2 others in our home along with "help me" signs posted to our windows. We called immediately and were so relieved that Mike was safe and made his way home."
    In an interview with Justin Louis of WOBM radio, Mike, who still seemed amazed by his ordeal, shared the story behind his frantic note.
    He said he was at his home in the Green Island community of Toms River when his kitchen was swept away, so he walked out of his house and was swept up in the current. He said he was pulled a half-mile into the bay and then spent about four hours trying to swim back home.
    "Well, the current took me to somewhere, which I didn't even know where I was, and it threw me back into the bay. And I tried to swim back to my house for some reason," Mike said. "You know, sometimes you don't think."
    He said he ended up across the bay at "some lady's house."
    "She had towels on the couch. I just wrapped my body with the towels. ... I was so thirsty because I drank so much salt water. I didn't think I was gonna make it."
    He penned the note in the dark.

    "I just wanted to have that note to tell my father I tried. You know, I wasn't a baby about it. I tried, I did my thing." Mike told WOBM.
    "I was swimming for so long. ... I was so cold, I thought I was just going to freeze right there," he said, "But that lady, I felt like for some reason, she knew someone was going to be in that house. She had these wool blankets all over the place. And I just wrapped myself in them."
    After a few hours inside in the dark, Mike ventured back out into the waters.
    "In the street there was about eight feet of water, and I'm like, I ain't dying like this, after all this, I ain't dying like this."
    He said he was picked up by someone named Frank on a personal watercraft. Frank took in Mike and warmed him by a gas stove and gave him hot chocolate.

    On Facebook, "Frank" Vicendese of Green Island writes of Mike, "He was very thankful to be alive and warm, also very emotional after warming up by my stove after it started to sink in what happened."
    Mike's journey took him to a friend's house in Kettle Creek, and then his dad came and picked him up. "I told my dad when I got home, you follow me" wherever I go, he said.
    Mike says in his conversation with Treglia he apologized for entering her home and said, "There was money on the table, I didn't take nothing. I just took something that would keep me warm."
    Treglia did not respond to a request for an interview.
    Louis of WOBM told Yahoo News he wanted to initially ensure the incident was a not a hoax so he called the number on the note.
    "At first it went straight to voice mail," Louis said. "But I had this feeling I should give it one more shot."
    When Louis called Tony's number, the happy father said, "That's my son Mike!"
    "He seems like a typical down-to-earth, mid-20s guy who is still pretty shaken up," Louis said of Mike after their interview.
    Some people on social media have called Mike's survival a miracle.
    He may not believe he stole anything during his ordeal. But certainly he was given a most valuable gift—his life.
    To be honest with you, I'm afraid of the dark now. I was in the dark for so long with at least 15 to 20 foot waves that with the bay crashing over me. I couldn't even breathe.
    I told my dad when I got home, you follow me everywhere you go.
    Mike says in his conversation with Treglia he apologized for entering her home and said, "There was money on the table, I didn't take nothing. I just took something that would keep me warm."
    Treglia did not respond to a request for an interview.
    Louis of WOBM told Yahoo News he wanted to initially ensure the incident was a not a hoax so he called the number on the note.
    "At first it went straight to voice mail," Louis said. "But I had this feeling I should give it one more shot."
    When Louis called Tony's number, the happy father said, "That's my son Mike!"
    "He seems like a typical down-to-earth, mid-20s guy who is still pretty shaken up," Louis said of Mike after their interview.
    Some people on social media have called Mike's survival a miracle.
    He may not believe he stole anything during his ordeal. But certainly he was given a most valuable gift—his life.
    To be honest with you, I'm afraid of the dark now. I was in the dark for so long with at least 15 to 20 foot waves that with the bay crashing over me. I couldn't even breathe.
    I told my dad when I got home, you follow me everywhere you go.

    Mike says in his conversation with Treglia he apologized for entering her home and said, "There was money on the table, I didn't take nothing. I just took something that would keep me warm."
    Treglia did not respond to a request for an interview.
    Louis of WOBM told Yahoo News he wanted to initially ensure the incident was a not a hoax so he called the number on the note.
    "At first it went straight to voice mail," Louis said. "But I had this feeling I should give it one more shot."
    When Louis called Tony's number, the happy father said, "That's my son Mike!"

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/amazing-story-survival-toms-river-man-leaves-farewell-165046433.html
    Last edited by mariab; November 5th, 2012 at 04:46 PM.

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    NH, I'm sorry to hear about the upset to your family. My brother's family -- he & his wife, her brother and his wife -- lost two adjacent houses there as well. They burnt to the ground when fire and rescue could not enter due to flooding. The area had been evacuated, so no one was hurt. One of the houses had been in the family since 1938, so a lot of memories are tied to the place. My sister-in-law was in tears when I spoke to her on the phone the other night.

  15. #60
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Sounds good.


    Architecture For Humanity Begins Recovery Work On East Coast

    by Carren Jao


    Devastation in Breezy Point, Queens (CNBC)

    As the northeast is slowly getting back on its feet, non-profit Architecture for Humanity is already commencing its plans for rebuilding and recovery. While it’s still early, the organization, which is partnering with AIA chapters in the hardest hit regions, is starting first with impact assessment. Generally working in hard hit areas around the world, this is the first time their New York chapter has had to respond locally, pointed out Jennifer Dunn, New York Chapter Leader. AFH is not only looking to re-build, but to re-build better. “We don’t just want to help build back the coastline but create more resilient communities that can withstand future disasters,” said co-founder Cameron Sinclair in a statement.

    Architecture for Humanity is looking for support in the form of donations or volunteers. Donations can be made online here, while volunteers should email volunteer@architectureforhumanity.org. Flood repair strategies are posted here. Further updates will appear on the Architecture for Humanity website as soon as they are available.

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/49321

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