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Thread: The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea

  1. #421
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    From the New Yorker (08.31.09); photo by Brian Finke ...

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  2. #422
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    The "water feature" turned out to be a big disappointment.
    How do those people bake themselves in the sun on those wood chairs without a proper way to cool themselves with water? I wouldn't last 15 minutes.

    Maybe they should just put out a garden hose.

  3. #423
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    The water feature was a block over at the Spike!

  4. #424

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    From the New Yorker (08.31.09); photo by Brain Finke ...

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    I saw some caliente chicas when I went to the High Line. This is a great spot.

  5. #425
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    The flowers are becoming more subdued, but I saw another industrious bumblebee today.

  6. #426
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    See article for 2005/2009 photo comparison.


    Up Over Chelsea, Something Saved, Something Lost

    I WALKED on the High Line for the first time on a drizzling afternoon in July 2005. I was worried about being caught by the police as I passed over what was once an elevated freight railroad, abandoned 25 years before, but my fears were forgotten once I squeezed through a small opening in a sheet-metal fence and entered the High Line proper, threading its way down through Chelsea.

    The tracks and sleepers were still in place. The grass and weeds grew higher than my head, and I saw that someone had cleared a plot among them and planted a little vegetable garden. Smashed beer bottles and the occasional crack pipe crunched underfoot. The old covered loading bays that cut into the buildings had become guerrilla art galleries, crammed with graffiti murals by some of New York’s legends, and in one case, an illegal iron installation welded to a steel beam.

    I did not see anyone else up there that day. The noise and hustle below were mostly muted. If the city were ever abandoned, I imagined, this was how it might look.

    Night was falling, and the drizzle had become rain. I found cover in one of the loading bays, just south of 14th Street. The isolated feeling I loved so much suddenly became overwhelming, and I swore I heard someone moving around in a recessed, darkened corner. I got spooked and left.

    Four years later, almost to the day, I returned to the High Line, now a refined urban park. Appropriately, it was a perfect sunny day. I held my camera in the same spots, and saw a landscape transformed. It was very pleasant, but I felt as though something had been lost.

    The graffiti murals have been cleaned off the walls. The iron sculpture was dismantled to give a better view of Spencer Finch’s public art project; his colored windows are pretty, but feel spineless and manufactured compared with the raw, unsanctioned work that used to be there. Walking the manicured paths, I could no longer bring myself to imagine the city in a different age. I found myself wishing that the High Line had never been touched.

    A friend who usually shares my sense of nostalgia for all things Old New York pointed out that the High Line was seen as dead space by billionaire developers who wanted to demolish it.

    We are lucky to have it at all.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/06/nyregion/06album.html

  7. #427

  8. #428

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Cars on the left, trucks on the right. How come?

  9. #429
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    ^ the right side is the chelsea market. those trucks are mostly for the (excellent) produce market inside, ronnybrook and others. they have a lock on that side of the street and are always there.

    excellent night shots, wow!

  10. #430

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    9/13, from one end to the other:







    The southern terminus:































    ^ suddenly, I'm hungry for carrots.























    A couple thoughts from my second visit: the stairs at the northern end are waaaaaaay too narrow (did someone mention this before?). It's tight having two people walk by eachother, and heaven forbid anyone stops to take a pic!

    Also, I tripped twice over the subtle beveling they do at the edges of the concrete planks (note: I'm not particularly prone to clumsiness), and I witnessed it happen to someone else also. They're too subtle; if the light isn't high constrast-y, your chances of missing the raised edges are pretty good.
    Last edited by kz1000ps; September 14th, 2009 at 01:04 AM.

  11. #431
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Marvelous tour, kz .

    I'm wondering what will happen to the plants during winter?

  12. #432
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    ^ same thing that happened to them when it was undeveloped i guess?

    yeah more great shots. nice. really captures a typical sunny day up there.

    anyone know what the projected finish date is for the highline building (it's the other one spanning over the highline at w14th st)? seems like slow going there recently.

  13. #433
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    No cover, no minimum at the High Line

    Voyeurism in New York surged after photos of naked guests at a hotel over the park hit the Web.

    By GERALDINE BAUM, Los Angeles Times

    Two couples, both from out of town, linger on the same park bench, gazing up at gauzy curtains in the windows of a 19-story hotel. They don't know each other, but there they are, on a sunny Labor Day afternoon, hoping to steal a glimpse of, well, for lack of a more delicate way to put it, naked people.

    Voyeurism became New York's hot attraction this summer, after guests were photographed in the buff prancing about, even having sex, in front of floor-to-ceiling windows at the Standard hotel in the hip Meatpacking District.

    The shenanigans unfolded as a result of a series of unintended circumstances. Start with the opening of the High Line Park, built on abandoned railroad tracks three stories above the street. Add a swank hotel, hoisted by massive pylons that straddle the High Line. Then bring on the combustible element: New Yorkers and tourists, who flocked to see the city's newest additions. As they walked the High Line, they quickly realized there was more to see than they could have dared to hope. With that, the High Line became a stage-set, as well as a destination.

    An Internet sensation

    All summer, images of the Standard's bawdy guests spread like cyber wildfire, and the management seemed to relish the attention, even encouraging new arrivals to go ahead and "just have fun!" The hotel's blog, briefly, linked to photos of two unclothed women in provocative positions.

    This 21st century urban voyeurism is the next logical step in a society that has been peeping and poking into private lives, with all of us participating -- on reality TV, through social networking and in confessional interviews and memoirs. It's what brought Bob and Beverly Taylor of Virginia, and Mike Louvascio and his girlfriend, Marilyn, from Long Island to share that bench on the High Line.

    "We're nudists," says Bob, 55, introducing himself. The Taylors say that they often vacation in the big city, but this time the much-publicized peep show at the Standard is at the top of their to-do list. "This was our next cool thing to see," says Beverly, 49.

    Louvascio, 64, and Marilyn, who prefers to not reveal her age or last name, are here for the shopping. Well, that's what drew Marilyn. Mike admits he has little interest in the area's designer boutiques that once were warehouses stacked with bloody animal carcasses.

    "I'd rather be hunting," he says of his favorite sport, shooting deer with bow and arrow. But "seeing naked people," he explains, "is something to do."

    Voyeurism is a part of everyday life here. Who hasn't made up a story about a neighbor on the next balcony who suns herself on summer weekends?

    Peering, leering, observing -- it has long been the quintessence of city life.

    In the 19th century, French poet Charles Baudelaire defined the spirit of the "flaneur," or the urban stroller, who saunters aimlessly with nothing more to do than experience the city. Alfred Hitchcock's film "Rear Window" portrayed a detached spectator armed with binoculars and raised the ethics of such spying.

    Opened in June, the High Line floats for 1.5 miles along the western edge of Manhattan. Familiar with the eagle's view and the street view, New Yorkers, like birds on a new branch, suddenly are waist-high to buildings.

    It's not just cheap thrills that mesmerize. From its rare perch, the park threads among old buildings and over parking lots from Gansevoort to W. 20th Street and eventually will extend to 34th street.

    A few days before the start of New York Fashion Week, designer Diane von Furstenberg flees her studio for her public/private garden, the High Line.

    The millions that she and her mogul husband, Barry Diller, donated in 2005 served as seed money to build the park. They later gave $10 million more. But it is not the naked frolickers who interest von Furstenberg.

    Just not her thing

    "It's a very nice crowd," she notes, smiling at two men canoodling on a bench. "There's so much to do, so beautiful to have the sunset on the West Side at this time of day."

    "I am totally not a voyeur," she says. "My son gave me for Christmas binoculars, very nice, but the truth is, I don't care. I don't look at other windows. I look at the sky, I look at the clouds, I look at the High Line. ... I'm not stopping at windows." Her bathtub is visible to guests in the Standard or from that bench where Bob and Beverly Taylor and Mike Louvascio and Marilyn are stationed.

    But Von Furstenberg always draws the curtains.

    "But why aren't you staying there yourselves, and doing your [nudist] thing?" Marilyn asks the Taylors.

    "It's too expensive for us to stay there," says Beverly, quoting rates of as much as $705 a night. But if they could afford it, they would take a room and undress for all to see, Bob says. But not for the excitement that some get from exhibitionism: "For us," he says, "it's about freedom."

    Marilyn looks skeptical. "Those people," she says, eyeing a 10th-floor hotel guest lounging in her underwear on a bed with the curtains open, "are interested in performing. They get off on it."

    http://www.startribune.com/nation/59...D3aPc:_Yyc:aUU

  14. #434

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    Today was the first day since my accident,
    that I felt strong enough to walk down to the highline,
    and get a look for myself...
    So crowded I got turned away
    (I'm still not strong enough to stand in l
    long lines)!


  15. #435
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Try again on a weekday. No problem. At least it was a beautiful day to be outdoors -

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