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Thread: The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea

  1. #46

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    New York Daily News - http://www.nydailynews.com

    Jets toss lifeline to the High Line

    By MICHAEL SAUL
    DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU

    Friday, April 16th, 2004

    The Jets plan to tear down a piece of the High Line elevated railway and then rebuild a portion as an entrance to a new West Side stadium, the Daily News has learned.

    The Jets also propose to link the abandoned 1.45-mile line to a new park created above the West Side Highway.

    The team plans to dismantle about a quarter-mile of the line and rebuild half that section to connect to the proposed 75,000-seat football stadium.

    The High Line, built in the 1930s to remove dangerous trains from Manhattan's streets, spans 22 blocks from 34th St. to Gansevoort St. No trains have run on it since 1980.

    Below the line on 30th St. between 11th and 12th Aves., the Jets are proposing a new street market that would feature art, antiques, crafts and furniture.

    The Jets' plans for the High Line will be formally unveiled today at a day-long Regional Plan Association forum on the far West Side.

    In March, Mayor Bloomberg and Gov. Pataki announced a $2.8 billion plan to build a stadium for the football team and expand the Javits Convention Center, including $1.3 billion in public funding.

    Last year, city officials announced an ambitious plan to transform the rail line into an elevated park. Jets executives said their proposal complements that plan.

    "We think that the New York Sports and Convention Center can breathe new life into the High Line," said Thad Sheely, the Jets' vice president for development.

    The proposal has some strong backers.

    "We're pleased that the New York Jets have recognized the value of the High Line and made its preservation and reuse a priority," said Robert Hammond, co-founder of the Friends of the High Line.

    But City Councilwoman Christine Quinn (D-Chelsea), who is against the stadium, called the Jets' High Line proposal "a drop in the bucket."

    Brian Hatch, who runs NewYorkGames.org, which also opposes the stadium, said the High Line should be preserved in its entirety. "When we get the stadium moved to Queens, we can come up with a plan for that area that will preserve the High Line," he said.

  2. #47

    Default access points

    Sorry-
    in July somebody asked me about access points-

    ACCESS- for those interested

    you can walk up the ramp at 34th and Tenth

    or use the stairs in Chelsea, at 17th and Tenth Ave

    (opposite the Park Restaurant)

    be careful

    also, see the link
    http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/...heHighLine.htm

    for some more pix and downloadable plan and section .dwgs.
    cheers
    tom

  3. #48

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    SEVEN DESIGN TEAMS SHORT-LISTED FOR HIGH LINE MASTER PLAN
    TEAM SELECTION EXPECTED IN FALL 2004


    April 20, 2004—Friends of the High Line (FHL) and the City of New York announced today that seven teams of architects, landscape architects, engineers, planners, and other design professionals are invited to compete to create a master plan for the High Line, an elevated rail structure on Manhattan's West Side.

    Each of the seven teams is led by an architecture, landscape architecture, or planning firm, or two or more firms joined in collaborative leadership. In alphabetical order:

    • Field Operations (James Corner); Diller + Scofidio + Renfro
    • Zaha Hadid Architects
    • Steven Holl Architects
    • Latz + Partner; The Saratoga Associates
    • Rogers Marvel Architects; Gustafson Guthrie Nichol
    • OpenMeshWork.ORG: OpenOffice (Lyn Rice); Mesh Architectures (Eric Liftin); Work Architecture Company (Amale Andraos, Dan Wood)
    • TerraGRAM: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates; D.I.R.T. Studio (Julie Bargmann); Beyer Blinder Belle (Neil Kittredge)

    The teams were selected from 52 responses to a Request for Qualifications that was released jointly by the City of New York and FHL on March 1, 2004. The conversion of the High Line to public open space has been a shared goal of the City and FHL since December 2002, when the City filed a federal petition to convert the structure to public open space through the federal "rail-banking" program.

    "We are thrilled that teams of this caliber will be considered to transform the High Line into one of the most unique and exciting public spaces in the City of New York," said City Planning Director Amanda M. Burden. "This process will form the backbone of one of the most significant aspects of the Bloomberg Administration's redevelopment plans for Manhattan's west side, enhancing the desirability of West Chelsea and the Hudson Yards to the north, as well as serving as an attraction for visitors to New York City. We are excited to be working with Friends of the High Line in this joint effort to convert the High Line into a spectacular public amenity."

    Next Steps in the Selection Process: 2-Stage RFP and Team Selection

    Each of the seven short-listed firms will now receive the first stage of a Request for Proposals (RFP), which asks them to further detail their proposed approach to the High Line's conversion. Based on their responses, the seven teams will be narrowed down to three finalists. Those finalists will receive the second stage of the RFP, requesting graphic representations of possible design concepts for the Line as a whole. The selection of a design team is expected by Fall 2004.

    "It's important to emphasize that we're selecting a team through this process-not a final design or master plan," said Robert Hammond, Co-Founder, Friends of the High Line. "Starting this fall, the team we select will work with active participation from the community and other affected stakeholders to develop a master plan that makes the most of the amazing opportunity offered by the High Line."

    Recent Funding Progress

    On March 25, Congressman Jerrold Nadler included $5 million for the High Line in the House version of the Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (TEA-LU), the six-year federal transportation bill. The bill must still go through a House and Senate conference process and be signed by the President.

    Earlier this year, $500,000 for the High Line was secured by Senators Schumer and Clinton and Congressman Nadler in the 2004 Transportation Bill. In July 2003, New York City Council Speaker Gifford Miller announced a $15.75 million commitment in capital funds for the High Line's conversion to public open space. In Fall 2003, Assembly Member Richard Gottfried announced a $50,000 High Line allocation.

    Project History

    The High Line, a 1.5-mile-long elevated rail structure on Manhattan's West Side, was built in the 1930s to remove freight trains from City streets. It hasn't been used for rail freight since 1980. In December, 2002, the City petitioned the federal board with jurisdiction over the Line to convert it to an elevated pedestrian walkway and public open space.

    In 2003, Friends of the High Line sponsored "Designing the High Line," an open, international ideas competition. 720 entrants from 36 countries submitted ideas, many of which were exhibited at Grand Central Terminal in July 2003.

    "The team selection process for the master plan is very different from the ideas competition," said Hammond. "The competition was to generate exciting, visionary ideas, but those ideas didn't have to be build-able or make economic sense. The process we're going through now will lead to a design for the High Line that is as spectacular and unusual as the High Line itself-a design that can be built and maintained so that this great new amenity stays beautiful and compelling in the decades ahead, a retreat that New Yorkers will want to return to again and again."

    For updates on the design team selection process and all other news related to the High Line, please go to http://www.thehighline.org and subscribe to FHL's E-Mail Newsletter.

    Contact: Robert Hammond, (212) 206-9922; robert@thehighline.org

  4. #49

    Default spring

    Was up the highline again a couple of days ago. Spring has sprung up there, but it still isn't anywhere near its screaming midsummer glory. We went up the ramp at 34th (deftly skirting the security guard- not difficult) and walked all the way along. Was good. We found that the traditional exit - the stairs in the carpark opposite the Park restaurant on tenth- were very well chained and razorwired, so we had to walk all the way back. Was nice anyway. There were some very precarious exit points but we decided that we were too old for that kind of thing.








    the full series can be seen at-
    http://nyc-architecture.com/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=5

    cheers

    Tom

  5. #50
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    You guys make a walk on the Highline more fun than I ever had up there. Maybe I should bring beer next time.

  6. #51

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    They supposedly cleaned it up a little while ago, but I was up there about a week afterward and it looked the damn same to me.

    It's not too precarious to get down on W. 13th street - plus it's like a fun obstable course, and it really requires pretty minimal athleticism. I'd bet some kids even climb up that way. Someone even put a ladder up to the hole in the roof of the loading dock to help you out. And you can catch a beer at Hogs and Heifers right down the block afterward!

    I really don't think that security guard - or anyone - much cares if people climb up there (a good thing, because people do it all the time). Which somewhat surprises me because it passes over the LIRR Rail Yards.

  7. #52

    Default FRONT-PAGE LOS ANGELES TIMES ARTICLE ABOUT THE HIGH LINE

    FRONT-PAGE LOS ANGELES TIMES ARTICLE ABOUT THE HIGH LINE

    On Saturday, May 15, the Los Angeles Times ran a comprehensive front-page article by Robert Lee Hotz about FHL's efforts to preserve and reuse the High Line. Along with its prominent placement and its thoughtful reporting, the article is notable for the way it defines the High Line as a project of national significance and includes details about other elevated rail-trail projects in Philadelphia, Chicago, and Rotterdam that have been influenced by FHL's work.

    COLUMN ONE
    An Eden Above the City

    An abandoned overhead railway in Manhattan is an eyesore to many. But others see untapped potential in the rare open space.




    Seeing Potential
    (Tina Fineberg / For The Times)



    Unused Open Space
    (Tina Fineberg / For The Times)
    Graphics


    A long walk waiting
    May 15, 2004
    Times Headlines

    An Eden Above the City


    By Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer


    NEW YORK — In the warrens of Manhattan, a meadow hovers above the asphalt outwash of warehouses and abandoned factories.

    It flowers on a vacant viaduct with a seasonal canopy of Queen Anne's lace, purple aster, hyacinth, wild cherry, scallions, moss and iris — seeded by vagrant birds and the wind.

    They call it the High Line.

    The derelict ribbon of elevated railway threads through the upper stories of Manhattan's far West Side for almost 1 1/2 miles.

    The tracks, unused for nearly a quarter-century, disappear into warehouses and dodge between buildings in an architectural game of hide-and-seek.

    While thousands of people scurry under its stained steel supports every day, unaware of what is overhead, the High Line has become nature's own urban renewal project.

    Ambitious redevelopment plans also are blooming here.

    Where generations of New Yorkers had only seen a rusting eyesore that blocked the light, two urban pioneers saw the potential for a park in a metropolis starved for open space. After all, local soccer leagues play matches on a rooftop and golfers practice fairway drives on a pier.

    When freelance writer Joshua David and painter Robert Hammond first followed their curiosity over a barbed-wire fence onto the High Line five years ago, they found themselves on an elevated avenue of greenery that overlooked the art galleries of Chelsea and the designer boutiques of the Meatpacking District — two of the city's newly fashionable neighborhoods.

    To the west, there were shimmering vistas of the Hudson River; to the east, the Empire State Building towered.

    The abandoned railway, the pair realized, could become a place where pedestrians could stroll unimpeded for 22 blocks, suspended nearly 30 feet in places above the hustle of the streets.

    "It is a beautiful, dreamy, evocative landscape … a unique urban ecosystem," David said. "Yet it was relatively invisible."

    People can't easily reach the High Line from the street. The stairways have vanished and the entrances — although hidden — are protected by padlocks and railroad security.

    David and Hammond were galvanized by the idea that an open space of such magnitude could exist in New York City and that no one could get to it.

    The pair launched the Friends of the High Line preservation drive, which quickly became one of the city's most fashionable causes. Today, it has about 6,000 supporters and a $1-million annual budget. There is a staff of seven, a newsletter, a promotional video, a website and an ambitious outreach program. A yearly fundraiser, hosted by fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg and actor Edward Norton, has become a staple on New York's society pages.

    "They have been very creative in generating a buzz and engaging people," said Frank Uffen, managing director of New Amsterdam Consultants, a firm involved in redeveloping a mile-long viaduct in downtown Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

    Architects and designers now nurture visions of an urban wilderness on the High Line — along with schemes for windmill farms, botanical gardens, an aerial tramway and, improbably, overhead cow pastures, all connected to the street by elevators and stairs.

    One designer offered a plan for turning the rail line into an inner-city roller coaster. Another proposed creation of a High Line swimming pool, with lap lanes 1 1/2 miles long.

    This month, David and Hammond are helping city planners evaluate seven design teams competing to oversee development of a master plan. The seven were picked in April from 52 groups of architects, urban planners and landscape designers.

    David and Hammond estimate the price tag for renovation and landscaping will be $40 million to $60 million, to be paid with public and private funds.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Vintage viaducts are the newest enthusiasm of urban preservationists recycling America's past.

    Community groups from Chicago to Philadelphia to the Florida Keys have mobilized to turn the abandoned rail lines into parks — many inspired by the transformation of a crumbling 19th century Parisian viaduct into a 3-mile-long botanical garden.

    The Promenade Plantee, which opened in 1998, is linked by elevators and stairways to the Avenue Daumesnil nearby. In the space beneath its 60 stone arches, Paris urban planners encouraged construction of art galleries, cafes and artisans' studios.

    As much as anything, said transportation archeologist Thomas Flagg, the reclamation projects have arisen from a change of heart toward abandoned industrial structures.

    Nostalgia for a vanishing manufacturing economy joins with post-modern artistic sensibilities and, driven by real estate speculation, blight becomes beauty.

    "All the space is getting filled in," said Ben Helphand, who recently helped organize Friends of the Bloomingdale Trail to reclaim 37 rail bridges along Chicago's North Side. "What do you have left but these unused industrial areas?

    "You see them in a new light. The reinvention of these is happening all over the place."

    In Florida, state park planners are piecing together the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail by converting unused rail lines and reclaiming 17 railroad bridges. They expect the trail to run 106 miles, from Key Largo to Key West.

    In the same spirit, Philadelphia neighborhood activists last year organized to transform a 4.7-mile-long elevated railway called the Reading Viaduct into a pedestrian parkway.

    "We have been living with this thing for a long time and dreaming it could be something else," said local artist Sarah McEneaney, who helped organize the preservation drive.

    "It goes through all these different neighborhoods that are not really tied together. The viaduct could become a community bridge."

    What spurred her to take action?

    One day, she heard Joshua David at a neighborhood meeting describe his hopes for the High Line.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    The High Line, bordering 10th Avenue, is 296,000 square feet of undeveloped space in a city where a $1-million, two-bedroom apartment can fit into 980 square feet.

    Completed in 1934, it was part of the $125-million West Side Improvement Project, which was an astronomical public investment for the height of the Depression.

    The project was designed to speed rail shipments to the area's factories, while also removing a major public danger.

    By raising the railroad above street level, officials eliminated dozens of hazardous track crossings: So many pedestrians had been killed or maimed in rail accidents that the street had come to be known as "Death Avenue."

    The viaduct, broad enough to carry two freight trains at a time, snakes past third-story windows and through elevated warehouse sidings.

    When the High Line was built, the project required private right-of-way agreements through 350 properties, according to records of the New York Central Railroad, which originally owned it. A total of 640 buildings had to be removed.

    The last train rolled down those tracks in 1980, carrying a load of frozen turkeys. By that time, trucks had overtaken trains as the preferred method for freight shipments. The West Side industries the viaduct served also had withered. Factories and warehouses were shuttered.

    People have been fighting over the future of the High Line ever since.

    Conrail now owns the line through a subsidiary, and CSX, the railroad conglomerate, has managed the structure since 1999. While the railroad has been studiously neutral about the fate of the High Line, officials are eager to see some resolution, said CSX project management consultant Lauri Izes.

    The parcels of land directly beneath the viaduct are owned by New York state, New York City and 20 private owners — many of whom have long sought its demolition.

    The High Line is, at its essence, a right of passage.

    The easement in the air that the railroad created allowed movement across so many public and private boundaries that it would be impossible to re-create today, community planners say.

    If the physical structure were demolished, that intangible asset would vanish as well.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    In a city that seethes with real estate schemes and redevelopment intrigue, Hammond and David have orchestrated a dramatic reversal.

    Five years ago, demolition of the High Line seemed all but assured. Landlords and small businesses that owned the land directly below the High Line were eager to see it cleared away, in the hope that their property values would soar.

    Today, reclamation and renovation appear almost certain.

    "They have taken the momentum away from the developers who wanted to tear it down," Flagg said. "Their dedication to creating a public good out of all this seems to be carrying the day."

    When Hammond, 34, and David, 40, began their quest, there was virtually unanimous political support for demolition of the High Line.

    Now, Republican Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has endorsed the project, as have the state's two Democratic U.S. senators, Charles E. Schumer and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    City Council Speaker Gifford Miller recently earmarked $15 million to plan and design the park, and Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) included $5 million for the High Line in the House version of the pending six-year federal transportation bill.

    The state has yet to weigh in. Federal approvals needed for the park project are in abeyance, partly because the commissions involved have long lacked enough members for a valid vote.

    "We still have a ways to go," Hammond said. "There are hurdles. Political coalitions are always fragile."

    But if all goes according to plan, work could begin this fall on a final design. A competition last year drew 720 design proposals from 36 countries, many of which were exhibited at Grand Central Terminal. These all were exercises in imagination, meant only to explore the possibilities.

    Before any real design begins, city officials must choose a team from among the seven candidates under consideration. That team will help manage development of final plans. Those plans must be approved by the city.

    For all the fashionable enthusiasm, however, the future of the High Line depends in large measure on the fate of other ambitious projects proposed for this section of Manhattan.

    The line begins to the north, at the site of the New York Jets' proposed stadium along the Hudson River. The football team wants to turn a quarter-mile of the High Line into a pedestrian walkway that would lead into a 75,000-seat stadium. An expansion of the nearby convention center also is being debated.

    The viaduct ends to the south over Gansevoort Market in the Meatpacking District, where David and Hammond recently opened a third-floor office for the High Line group they founded.

    The view from their window encompasses the past and the future of the High Line neighborhoods.

    On one side of the street below, meatpackers in bloody aprons shovel fresh offal from the cobblestones by the Dumpster load. Animal carcasses swing on conveyor hooks along the sidewalk for the purveyors of fresh shin meats, pork and beef.

    Across the way, retailers cater to the appetite for fresh attitude. Art galleries, fusion restaurants and stylish boutiques line the street. Stella McCartney and other designers have opened shops.

    As unmistakable evidence that the gentry are homesteading here, city planners last year declared the market area a historic preservation district.

    City planners also unveiled a rezoning proposal to turn the adjacent High Line neighborhoods into a special redevelopment district.

    If approved, the proposal would allow construction of up to 4,200 high-rise apartments and condominiums. The zoning plan would, however, preserve the line and the local warehouses that have become home to more than 200 art galleries.

    A harbinger of the streetscape to come can be found at the viaduct's midpoint, where neglect and urban renewal have fostered a modest neighborhood revival.

    There, by the corner of West 23rd Street and 10th Avenue, author and Vanity Fair writer Sebastian Junger recently opened a sidewalk cafe. Students, French tourists and local artists loll in the shade cast by the High Line's Art Deco balustrade.

    The front of the art galley next door is clad in steel plates that consciously echo the patina of the railroad viaduct.

    For now, the High Line passing overhead remains an afterthought.

    Wreathed in grape hyacinth, its bulwarks frame parking signs, vintage graffiti and a set of garish billboards.

    Gallery-goers mill along the sidewalks, oblivious to the possibilities taking root in the relic above them.

  8. #53

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    FOUR FINALIST TEAMS SELECTED FOR HIGH LINE MASTER PLAN
    Proposals on Display at the Center for Architecture from
    July 15 through August 14

    May 28, 2004—Friends of the High Line (FHL) and the City of New York announced today that four teams of renowned architects, landscape architects, engineers, planners, and other professionals have been selected as finalists to create a master plan for the High Line, an elevated rail structure on Manhattan's West Side.

    "Transforming the High Line into a unique and accessible elevated park will be one of the most important things we will do for future generations in New York City," said Amanda M. Burden, Chair of the City Planning Commission. "The team we choose must be of a caliber that matches that important task. Fortunately, we are selecting from among the finest minds in architecture and landscape design, whose team submissions demonstrate the creative vision necessary for this project. I am thrilled to be taking part in selecting these talented finalists."

    Each team is led by an architecture firm, a landscape architecture firm, or multiple firms joined in collaborative leadership. Below, team leads and principal consultants, in alphabetical order. Full team listings can be found at the end of this document:

    • Field Operations, landscape architects; Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, architects; Olafur Eliasson, artist; Piet Oudolf, horticulture; Halie Light & L’Observatoire International, lighting.
    • Zaha Hadid Architects, architects; Balmori Associates, landscape architects; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, LLP (Marilyn Jordan Taylor), architects; studio MDA (Markus Dochantschi), architects.
    • Steven Holl Architects, architects; Hargreaves Associates, landscape design; HNTB, technical design.
    • TerraGRAM: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, landscape architects; D.I.R.T. Studio (Julie Bargmann), industrial site design; Beyer Blinder Belle (Neil Kittredge), urban design.


    Team Visions on Display at the Center for Architecture July 15 – August 14
    The design approaches of the finalist teams will be exhibited at the Center for Architecture starting Thursday, July 15, when an opening night panel discussion will be moderated by Rick Bell, Executive Director of AIA New York Chapter. The exhibition will run through August 14.

    Center for Architecture
    536 LaGuardia Place
    New York, NY 10012
    (212) 683-0023
    Open Monday through Friday, 9am to 8pm; Saturday, 11am to 5pm


    Team Selection Process
    The process of selecting a design team for the High Line master plan began on March 1, 2004, when the City of New York and FHL jointly issued a Request for Qualifications, eliciting 52 responses. A short list of seven teams was announced on April 20, and these short-listed teams received a two-stage Request for Proposals (RFP). On May 27, a Steering Committee of City and FHL representatives selected the four finalist teams based on their responses to the first stage of the RFP.


    Next Steps
    The four finalist teams will submit responses to the second stage of the RFP in early July. Those responses will include visions for the High Line as a whole, and they will specifically address access systems, the High Line's interaction with neighboring buildings, and treatment of the structure's underside and its relation to the street. This work will be the focus of the July 15 – August 14 exhibition at the Center for Architecture. It will also inform the final team selection, which will be made later this summer.

    "It's important to emphasize that we're selecting a team through this process, not a final design or master plan," said Robert Hammond, co-founder of Friends of the High Line. "Once selected, the team will work with the community, FHL, the City, and all other interested stakeholders to develop the master plan."


    Recent Funding Progress
    On March 25, Congressman Jerrold Nadler included $5 million for the High Line in the House version of the Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (TEA-LU), the six-year federal transportation bill. The bill must still go through a House and Senate conference process and be signed by the President.

    Earlier this year, Senators Schumer and Clinton and Congressman Nadler secured $500,000 for the High Line in the 2004 Transportation Appropriations bill. In July 2003, New York City Council Speaker Gifford Miller announced a $15.75 million commitment in capital funds for the High Line's conversion to public open space. In Fall 2003, Assembly Member Richard Gottfried announced a $50,000 High Line allocation.


    Project History
    The High Line, a 1.5-mile-long elevated rail structure on Manhattan's West Side running from 34th Street to Gansevoort Street, was built in the 1930s to remove freight trains from City streets. It has not been used for rail freight since 1980. In December, 2002, the City petitioned the federal board with jurisdiction over the Line to convert it to an elevated pedestrian walkway and public open space.

    In 2003, Friends of the High Line sponsored "Designing the High Line," an open, international ideas competition. 720 entrants from 36 countries submitted ideas, many of which were exhibited at Grand Central Terminal in July 2003.

    "The team selection process for the master plan is very different from the ideas competition," said Hammond. "The competition was to generate exciting, visionary ideas, but those ideas didn't have to be buildable or make economic sense. The process we're going through now will lead to a design for the High Line that is as spectacular and unusual as the High Line itself—a design that can be built and maintained so that this great new amenity stays beautiful and compelling in the decades ahead, a retreat that New Yorkers will want to return to again and again."

    For updates on the design team selection process and all other news related to the High Line, please go to http://www.thehighline.org and subscribe to FHL's E-Mail Newsletter.


    Complete Listings of Finalist Team Members
    • Field Operations, landscape architects; Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, architects; Olafur Eliasson, artist; Piet Oudolf, horticulture; Halie Light & L’Observatoire International, lighting; Mathews-Nielsen, landscape architecture; Buro Happold, structural engineering; Philip Habib Associates, traffic engineering and zoning; ETM Associates, park operation; The Williams Group, economic analysis; VJ Associates, cost estimating; Creative Time, public art; Paula Scher of Pentagram, graphics; Bonakdar Gallery, public outreach; Ducibella, Venter & Santore, security; Robert Silman Associates, structural engineering and historic preservation; Code Consultants, compliance; GRB Environmental Services, environmental engineering and testing.
    • Zaha Hadid Architects, architects; Balmori Associates, landscape architects; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, LLP (Marilyn Jordan Taylor), architects; studio MDA (Markus Dochantschi), architects; Creative Time, public art; The Kitchen, public art; Public Art Fund, public art; Environmental Risk, Inc., hazardous material testing; Iros Elevator Design, elevator, escalator consultant; Halie Light & L’Observatoire International, lighting; Arup, structure, MEP, acoustic, security, transport, geotechnical, sustainability; Langan Engineering, environmental engineering; Davis Langdon Adamson, cost estimator; William Dailey, building code expeditor; Pentagram, graphic design.
    • Steven Holl Architects, architects; Hargreaves Associates, landscape design; HNTB, technical design; Schall & Russo, outreach consulting; Halie Light & L’Observatoire International, lighting; Martin and Mildred Friedman, public arts; David Langdon Adamson, cost; Metropolis, code; Catherine Seavitt Studio, landscape architecture; Bioengineering Group, Inc., sustainable site development; AKRF, environmental strategy planning; Guy Nordenson Associates, structural engineering; Munoz Engineering, surveying; Arup, MEP engineering; ETM Associates, public space management.
    • TerraGRAM: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, landscape architects; D.I.R.T. Studio (Julie Bargmann), industrial site design; Beyer Blinder Belle (Neil Kittredge), urban design; ARO, architects; Leslie E. Robertson Associates, structural engineering; 2x4, graphic design; Domingo Gonzales Associates, lighting design; Lynden Miller, public garden design; Nina Bassuk, urban soils and ecology; Ernesto Mark Faunlagui, design consulting; Daniel Frankfurt, PC, civil and structural engineering; Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers, geotechnical engineering; Aphrodite Socrates, hazardous material management; GEOD, land surveying; Mathews-Nielsen Landscape Architects, street architecture, maintenance; Accu-Cost, cost estimating; Battle McCarthy, sustainability consulting; Rocky Mountain Institute, environmental planning; Arup, traffic engineering; Charles McKinney, park operations consulting; Luc Sante, urban history; Public Art Fund, arts programming; RFR Engineering, infrastructural history; James Turrell, artist.



    ###


    Contact
    Joshua David, FHL, (212) 206-9922;
    josh@thehighline.org

    Meghan Dotter, RF/Binder, (212) 994-7552;
    meghan.dotter@rfbinder.com

  9. #54
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    New Park Is Right On Track

    By Tom Topousis, May 31, 2004

    One of New York's hidden treasures - a rusting elevated railroad that stretches down Manhattan's West Side - is about to take its first step toward a public debut. Four design teams were picked last week to compete for the job of turning the long-dormant freight railroad into the city's newest public park.

    Running more than a mile, from the West Side railroad yards at 30th Street to the Meatpacking District, the High Line is an oasis in the sky now covered with wildflowers and trees and inhabited by birds and butterflies.

    "The High Line is just so magical," said city Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden. "I always said that if I were in a position of power or influence, saving it would be one of the first things that I would do."

    The future wasn't always so bright for the High Line, last used to carry freight in 1982. Just four years ago, the city was ready to begin demolition on the structure.

    But two West Siders who were fascinated with the structure began a drive to save the railroad, recognizing its potential as a public project that would lift New Yorkers 35 feet above the street and what seems a world away from the congestion below.

    Robert Hammond and Joshua David in 1999 formed a group called Friends of the High Line, which began to turn the tide from demolition to preservation. Their efforts won over officials in the Bloomberg administration.

    "It's so easy to live close to it and never really understand what it is," said David. "But just the idea that this hidden structure existed and ran 22 blocks was fascinating to me."

    In a rare walk along the High Line - shut off from the public by its operator, CSX Railroad - The Post caught a glimpse of Manhattan from the elevated tracks, which have become a nature preserve.

    Between two tall warehouses, a small forest has sprouted. Near 14th Street, a wild cherry tree is taking root beside a rusting railroad switch. Hyacinth, Queen Anne's lace and purple aster flourish in the sun-drenched sections of the old viaduct.

    A final design for the railroad's conversion will be picked in July, after the three teams put their proposals up for public display.

    With an estimated $65 million price tag, the project is expected to be open to the public late in 2006.


    NYPOST

  10. #55
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris
    The competition entry by Gisue Hariri of Hariri and Hariri:





    http://www.archidose.org/Nov03/111003.html
    I like this design. It was getting interesting..well too bad. :cry:
    Last edited by Kris; August 23rd, 2010 at 03:55 PM.

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  12. #57

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    July 11, 2004

    Elevated Visions

    By JULIE V. IOVINE

    Slide Show: Proposals for the High Line

    THE High Line is an abandoned 1.5-mile stretch of overgrown railroad viaduct that runs from the Meatpacking district to Hell's Kitchen — and straight into the imaginations of a growing number of New Yorkers who see it as proof that, even in an urban jungle, the forces of nature are still at work.

    The idea to turn the old freight route, once condemned to demolition, into a public park has gained momentum over the past five years, culminating in a design competition that attracted 52 entries. On July 16 the proposals of four finalists will go on display at the Center for Architecture on LaGuardia Place near Bleecker Street.

    By most standards, the High Line possesses none of the qualities of a park. An elevated rail line 30 to 60 feet wide and two stories above street level, it was built in the 1930's to connect the Pennsylvania Railroad Yards and the warehouses of Greenwich Village. By 1980, most of the industries it had served were defunct, the trains were derailed, the tracks went to seed and the myth began to sprout. It was fertilized by a series of photographs taken in 2000 by Joel Sternfeld, showing off the industrial ruin as a particularly contemporary landscape — the eerie serenity of its black rails sweeping through a snowy strip of stubble in the winter, bristling waves of grass poking out between its steel trusses in the summer.

    Last year, the Friends of the High Line, a group of artists, writers and concerned neighbors, invited architects, designers and homegrown visionaries to submit blue-sky ideas for the track's future. It attracted 720 entries from 36 countries, including one proposal to turn the entire length of the railroad bed into a swimming pool. After that, a $15 million commitment from the City Council and a rezoning proposal helped catapult the High Line's revival from long shot to a viable scheme, and a more selective competition for a workable master plan was undertaken.

    The caliber of the finalists — from Steven Holl, a Manhattan architect who had previously proposed a series of bridge-shaped houses straddling the rails, to Zaha Hadid, the London-based architect who won the 2004 Pritzker Prize — reflects the seriousness of the project. Total rebuilding, however, is not part of anyone's plan. "The park of the future will be built on industrial sites like this one," said Robert Hammond, a co-founder of the Friends of the High Line. "And we want to show that a park doesn't have to be Central Park to succeed. It can be a thin linear space cutting next to buildings." The winning team will be announced in August, at which point its design will be subject to revision.

    The Friends of the High Line and city representatives who will be judging the competition expect contestants to give the High Line a new life and purpose while still respecting its serendipitous character as a streak of wilderness in the city.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  13. #58

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    I cant get a sense of wha any of them will look like with those pictures....Yhe guy holding flowers? WTF, some times these wannabe bohemian people piss me off.

  14. #59
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    HIGH LINE: SKY'S LIMIT


    By TOM TOPOUSIS
    July 15, 2004

    New Yorkers will get their first glimpse today of dramatic proposals to convert a long-unused railroad trestle on Manhattan's West Side into a spectacular park in the sky, including calls for high-flying pools, wetlands and nature trails.

    Four design teams have submitted their proposals in hopes of winning the prestigious job of transforming the High Line into a 1.5-mile public space that stretches from the Meatpacking District through the art galleries of Chelsea.

    "They've met our expectations and exceeded them," said Joshua David, a co-founder with Robert Hammond of the group Friends of the High Line, which is coordinating the project with the city's Planning Department.

    The Post obtained an exclusive look at the designs, which range from a modernistic overhaul of the viaduct into a series of outdoor art projects on one end of the spectrum, to rustic paths through fields of grasses and wild flowers on the other.

    Beginning tomorrow, the proposals will be on public display at the American Institute of Architecture's gallery at 536 La Guardia Place in Greenwich Village. A finalist will be chosen in August and a master plan for the project is expected by next spring.

    The High Line, once slated for demolition and now strictly off limits to the public, is on track to be fully opened by 2006, with some sections made accessible earlier as work on the viaduct goes along. The project will cost about $65 million.


    The design teams are:

    * Field Operations with Diller, Scofidio and Renfro:

    James Corner, founder of Field Operations, envisions a "fantastic, mixed perennial landscape" punctuated by "event spaces" that would include a clear-bottomed pool and a grandstand rising off the trestle.

    * Steven Holl Architects:

    Steven Holl calls the High Line "a suspended valley, a green strip" running through Chelsea. His plan includes a landscaped tower at the north end. "It's a piece of Zen poetry and I insist that it shouldn't be over-programmed."

    *TerraGram/Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates:

    Team leader Michael Van Valkenburgh said the design will be "a celebration of the natural phenomenon" already taking root on the train trestle and will include plantings of mustard seed and sunflowers that eliminate toxins in the soil.

    * Zaha Hadid Architects:

    Markus Dochantschi, who coordinated the team, described the High Line as a rare horizontal setting in a vertical city. "Our theme is movement and the dynamic of movement," he said of the plan that would include rotating public art shows.


    Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

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