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Thread: The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea

  1. #751
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Given that the tracks look brand new - spic + span, that might have been an opening day event with NYCRR guys.

  2. #752
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    You're right. No soot on the building facade.

  3. #753
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Groundbreaking on the High Line at the Rail Yards!
    Today marks an incredible milestone for the High Line. Earlier today we joined our elected officials, some of our supporters, and local students for a groundbreaking ceremony on the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards.

    Today's event was a ceremonial moment to celebrate the start of construction, which will officially begin next month. To mark to occasion, we joined Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Speaker Christine Quinn, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, and students from the Clinton Middle School in Chelsea to toss native grass and wildflower seeds into the air and onto the High Line at the Rail Yards. The existing, self-seeded landscape will be preserved in the design of the High Line's final section.

    The design for the High Line at the Rail Yards reflects public feedback gathered during recent community input meetings. The final section will include familiar elements like the iconic "peel-up" benches, intimate overlooks, and meandering pathways. It will also feature new elements like a designated play area for children, new bench typologies, and an interim walkway wending through the existing landscape of self-seeded wildflowers and grasses.

    View map, groundbreaking photos, and design renderings for the first phase

    Construction will proceed in three phases, with the first phase projected to open to the public in 2014, extending the park to the northern terminus of the elevated rail structure at West 34th Street.

    Many people in both the public and private sectors have helped make this historic moment possible. We would like to thank our elected officials Mayor Michael Bloomberg; the New York City Council, under the leadership of Speaker Christine Quinn and her predecessor Gifford Miller; Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer; U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, as well as our former Senator and current Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; Congressman Jerrold Nadler; Governor Andrew Cuomo; State Senator Tom Duane; State Assembly Members Richard Gottfried and Deborah Glick; our partners at Manhattan Community Boards 2 and 4; our visionary philanthropic leaders Diane von Furstenberg and Barry Diller, The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, and Donald Pels and Wendy Keys; Related Companies, Oxford Properties Group, Coach, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for its partnership in opening the High Line's final section; CSX Transportation, Inc. for donating the High Line structure to the City of New York; our Board Chair John Alschuler and Board members, and finally, the hundreds of neighbors, supporters, volunteers like you who have dedicated time, and energy to our efforts to save the entire High Line and transform it into an extraordinary public park.

    We still have more work to do to fund the estimated total $90 million cost of building the High Line at the Rail Yards. We are grateful to the Bloomberg administration and New York City Council for contributing $10 million toward capital construction, as well as Related Companies and Oxford Properties Group for committing to provide $27.8 million in funding toward the capital construction of the High Line at the Rail Yards, as well as additional funding for the park's ongoing maintenance, as part of their development of Hudson Yards.

    Friends of the High Line has committed to raise $20 million in funding from philanthropic sources to support the cost of building the High Line at the Rail Yards. We'll need your continued support as we move forward with construction and continue our efforts to build an endowment for the High Line's future.

    Nevertheless, today is a day for celebration. It marks a new high point in the 13 years of advocacy for the High Line, as we take the first step toward completing the final section of the High Line. We hope you share our joy in this event, and we thank you for all your support in getting us here.

  4. #754
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Groundbreaking at the High Line at the Rail Yards!

    HIGH LINE BLOG
    Author: Kate Lindquist
    September 20, 2012






    Construction Phasing Map.
    The High Line at the Rail Yards will be constructed in phases. Phase 1 will extend from the end of Section 2 of the High Line (currently open to the public) all the way to West 34th Street. Phase 2 will cover the area to the east of Section 2, including the 10th Avenue Spur. Phase 1 will include two different types of construction: over the Eastern Rail Yards, the High Line structure will undergo a full capital rehabilitation, and the park will be fully built out to a level similar to the previous sections; over the Western Rail Yards, the work will be limited to an interim walkway installed in the existing landscape that will allow the public to experience the High Line’s remarkable self-seeded wildflowers and grasses. This area will be fully built out in a future Phase 3.



    Context Map.
    Highlighted above in green, the rail yards section of the High Line runs for one-half mile north of the portion of the High Line that is currently open as public space. The rail yards section is located between West 30th and West 34th Streets to the south and north, and 10th and 12th Avenues from the east and west. Image from Google Maps.



    Context Map Detail.
    The High Line at the Rail Yards wraps around the West Side Yards, an active train yard for Long Island Rail Road. The area over the tracks has been leased by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) to The Related Companies to build a platform over the tracks and create the new Hudson Yards mixed-use development above.


  5. #755
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ Yay! \/


    High Line Begins Construction On Third And Final Section

    By Mathew Katz

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and other public and park officials marked the occasion by tossing seeds around the untamed wilds of the undeveloped third section — currently overgrown with plants — along with students from Clinton Middle School.

    "By the time they are fully grown this will have become the third and final section of the beautiful, groundbreaking and now world-famous High Line park," Bloomberg said.

    The $90 million project will transform unused elevated rail tracks that run around a train yard from West 30th to West 34th streets from 10th to 12th Avenues.

    Construction will be divided into three phases — the first is set to open in 2014 and include a walkway that will allow visitors to see the urban wilderness that's now there, one that Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond said he was excited about.

    "One of the parts that I'm most looking forward to is this interim walkway that will wind through this existing landscape, the very same landscape that [Friends of the High Line co-founder Josh David] and I first fell in love with 13 years ago," he said.

    Other plans for the third section include more plants, a beam-and-girder playground, and a train car cafe.

    Money for the project will come from a mix of public and private donors, including $10 million from the city and $20 million raised by Friends of the High Line. Another $27.8 million will come from Related Companies and Oxford Property Group, which are developing the Hudson Yards project next door.

    "The High Line, now in its final phase, is a place that really shows us that when we all come together: activists, philanthropists, business people, government, we can make amazing things happen that are beyond what anyone could ever have imagined," Quinn said.

    The first two sections of the High Line have brought huge amounts of new investment to the new area, Bloomberg said, including a doubling in new building permits in its immediate vicinity.

    "These new arrivals share this fresh, dynamic, creative energy that is the calling card of the High Line and I think they're great examples of how great parks can spur private investment," he said.

    That economic activity has not been without its critics, who say the park has turned Chelsea into a haven for tourists and the rich while pushing out small businesses and the poor.
    But Bloomberg countered that notion, saying that the city needed change to thrive.

    "If we didn't change Midtown, Central Park would be a shanty town like it was for many years," he said. "You have to keep changing, that's what improves lives and makes things interesting."

    One person was unequivocal about the contribution the elevated park has made to the neighborhood — Diane von Furstenburg who, along with her husband Barry Diller, has donated millions to the park.

    "Thirteen years ago I moved to this neighborhood and at that time the neighborhood didn't really smell very good," she said. "This has been an example for all over the world."

    The public will have one final shot at seeing the third section before heavy construction begins — a handful of lucky people will be able to tour it as part of Open House New York in early October.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...w-york#s776667

  6. #756

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    Great news!

  7. #757

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    Neat-O

    Last piece of High Line opens to limited public view before $90 million park project starts


    New Yorkers will be able to get a glimpse of the ‘before’ as part of the Open House New York weekend.

    By Nicole Lyn Pesce / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS


    Friday, October 5, 2012, 9:02 PM

    Friends of the High Line

    This section will be transformed into the Interim Walkway, which will boast views of the Hudson River and the Midtown skyline.



    The last piece of the High Line opens for limited public tours on Saturday, giving visitors who reserved tickets in advance a chance to see the elevated tracks in their original state before construction on the $90 million park extension begins this fall.
    INSIDE THE HIGH LINE'S THIRD PHASE
    Interest in the sold-out tours, part of Open House New York weekend on Oct. 6th and 7th, was so great that the OHNY website crashed when registration opened last week. Clothing retailer Uniqlo, which is also presenting the sneak peeks, added extra walkabouts on Oct. 13 and 14th to meet the sky-high demand.
    Got locked out of a spot? Fear not — the Daily News brings you a first look at the new section.
    The remainder of the park runs in a half-mile arc 23 feet in the air from the present end of the finished part of the High Line, at 30th St., to the Javits Center on 34th St., between 10th and 12th avenues. The tracks curve around the Long Island Railroad storage yard before opening to views of the Hudson River and the midtown skyline.
    Monarch butterflies and honeybees light upon the daisies, Queen Anne’s Lace and yellow compass flowers that spill across the rusted rails at 30th St. and 11th Ave. This will become the Beam Exploration Area, a play space where kids can climb on the High Line’s original framework, which will be covered with a rubber safety coating.
    Michael Schwartz for New York Daily News


    The unfinished section of the High Line will be transformed into a park.


    Relics like switch boxes, a cracked pair of goggles and a sun-bleached boot lie scattered about the park at 30th St. just west of 10th Ave. This will be turned into the Rail Track Walk and Grasslands Grove, outfitted with the park’s “peel up” benches, picnic areas and walkways embedded with the High Line’s original railroad tracks.
    The 11th Avenue Bridge and Catwalk will rise two feet above the High Line at 30th St. to offer panoramic views of the city and the river.
    The new section’s most dramatic space will be the Interim Walkway, where the tracks curve northwest around the rail yard at 30th St. and 12th Ave. A portion of the self-seeding landscape, where morning doves and chickadees roost in the shrubs, will be left alone so guests can see some of the native plant growth.
    After Oct. 13, the High Line at the Rail Yards will close to the public for construction. The new section’s first phase, between 30th and 34th streets, should open by 2014.
    Michael Schwartz for New York Daily News


    The final section of the High Line is going to be transformed in a $90 million park development.


    YOU SHOULD KNOW
    The High Line at the Rail Yards runs half a mile between West 30th and 34th streets between 10th and 12th avenues, curving around the Long Island Railroad storage yard. The first phase, extending from the existing High Line Park at 30th St. to the Javits Center, is set to open in 2014. See thehighline.org for more information.
    Friends of the High Line

    Artist's rendering of the finished final section of the High Line.





    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...#ixzz28YO30TYl

  8. #758

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    As NYC finally collapses when the next financial crisis hits, I'm sure this elevated park will just revert back to its original state.

  9. #759
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Yep.

    And I am also sure that when Gabriel blows his horn the multitudes will line the gates of heaven and hell as Judgement Day commences.

    Until then, I would kind of like it if the city had a few nice places to walk around.

  10. #760

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    Amazing what can be found growing at the entrance to the still wild part of high line at 34th st....

  11. #761

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    Apples??? And you didn't even have to go to a street market!

    Title of pic:

    "An Apple Tree Grows in Manhattan"

  12. #762
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Along the stretch that runs above the West Side Hiway there's a little peach tree, too.

  13. #763
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New York's High Line: Why cities want parks in the sky

    By Robin Banerji



    Once an elevated freight railway track, New York's High Line is now an oasis for pedestrians. It has been so popular that other cities are following suit, with plans to replicate the formula in London. What is the secret of its success?

    In 1980 the last freight train ran along the elevated railway line in the Lower West Side of Manhattan. Reportedly, it pulled three boxcars of frozen turkeys.

    Almost 20 years later, in August 1999, local architectural enthusiasts Joshua David and Robert Hammond went along to a public meeting to discuss the future of the High Line.

    Within months the two New Yorkers - variously described as total amateurs and neighbourhood nobodies - founded the Friends of the High Line, a charity that has gone on to transform the abandoned railway line into a wildly successful new kind of public space - part-beach, part-park, and part-promenade.

    Since opening in 2009, the High Line has become New York City's second most visited cultural venue, attracting some four million visitors a year. Through Mr David and Mr Hammond's work, a relic of the 1930s has become the catwalk of 21st Century New York.


    High Line co-founder Robert Hammond visits Bishopsgate Goods Yard

    Already cities around the world are interested in learning from New York.

    In Shoreditch, east London, the idea of building a new park on top of the old railway arches at the Bishopsgate Goods Yard, abandoned since the mid 1960s, is being considered.

    Chicago is proposing to redevelop 2.7 miles (4.3 km) of disused elevated railway line into the Bloomingdale Trail. Its fellow US city Philadelphia is looking at transforming the Reading Viaduct into an elevated linear park. And in Rotterdam, Netherlands, another old elevated track is being considered as a site for a park and shops. The High Line itself echoes Paris' Promenade Plantee, inaugurated in 1993.

    And it's hoped that the formula can be repeated on more besides disused railways.

    James Corner, the British landscape architect who designed the High Line, is working on the transformation of London's Olympic South Plaza into part of the future Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Corner is also working on a proposal to redevelop Liverpool's 1980s Everton Park.

    A competition to design London's answer to the High Line has just been won by a project to grow mushrooms in unused mail tunnels under Oxford Street. It's unlikely to be built, but it was this kind of radical thinking that made the High Line a hit.


    Disused railway tracks in the UK have also been turned into rural walkways.

    The Parkland Walk, north London is built on a line first opened in 1867 as part of Great Northern Railway. The last train ran in 1970 and a linear park opened shortly afterwards, with two walkable sections. Plans to build a dual carriageway in the late 1980s were successfully opposed by locals and environmentalists. It is London's longest local nature reserve at 4.5 miles (7.2km).
    Monsal Trail and Tunnels, Derbyshire, was originally built in 1863 by Midland Railway, and operated until 1968. The 8.5-mile (13.6km) Monsal Trail reopened for public use in 1981, but four tunnels remained closed for safety reasons. A restoration project to reopen the four tunnels, in 2011, cost £2.25m ($3.6m).

    "It's not surprising that other places would imitate it," says architect and broadcaster Maxwell Hutchinson.


    "It's a fantastic project, and we're always looking at ways of increasing the amount of green space in our densely-packed cities."
    Whether these schemes can repeat the High Line's success and transform industrial mystery meat into filet mignon depends on a host of factors, however.

    Key to the New York project's success is the fact that it's both an elevated park and one of the city's finest walkways.

    You can amble along its one mile (1.6 km) route taking in views of the Hudson river, Chelsea and the Meatpacking District. It is a place where you can stop on one of the many benches or banks of steps, and sunbathe or gaze over the railings, or through a large picture window at the passing pedestrians or the cars on 10th Avenue.

    But it is not just its incredible popularity that has got developers and city officials talking about the High Line, it is also the tonic effect it has had on land values and real estate prices in the area it passes through.

    All along the route, prices have shot up. Apartments that were once in the middle of nowhere are now hot property. Fancy hotels such as the Standard now arch over the old railway line.

    As a result, there has been an estimated $2bn (£1.25bn) of new economic activity along the route of the High Line.



    So the first thing for any would-be imitator to bear in mind is that it took a great deal of cash to make it happen.
    "If the project doesn't work financially, it doesn't work," says Mr David.

    When he and Mr Hammond made the case for the High Line to New York City, they estimated that given that parks increase the value of nearby properties and thus their taxable value, the High Line could bring in $262m (£164m) in extra tax revenues to the city over a 20-year period.

    It seems that their estimate was too conservative. They now reckon that the value to the city in extra tax revenue over a 20-year period will be somewhere in the region of $900m (£563m) - not bad for a project that cost $112m (£70m).

    Not only does the city of New York have funds for capital projects, there were a lot of rich and famous people whom Mr David and Mr Hammond were able to approach for help, including actors Kevin Bacon and Edward Norton.

    But it was also the novelty and boldness of the High Line that has contributed to its success. Mr David calls the viaduct "a found object". He and Mr Hammond were both able to see something in it that others could not.

    When it came to choosing the architect and landscape architects for the project, they went for something unusual. They opted for a team that hadn't built much but who appreciated both the architectural qualities of the rusting railway bridges and the need to make the greenery in the park distinctive.

    The winning team included the Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf, whose choice of grasses and perennials are not only fashionably "wild" but are also in keeping with the wilderness that grew up after the line's abandonment in 1980.

    Mr David and Mr Hammond aimed high, spending money on publicity in Grand Central Station, hiring a Washington DC lobbyist, and - as they like to say themselves - throwing parties in style.
    But above all, it helped that the project was inclusive. The High Line is a New York City park and so open to everyone for free.

    The pair started as community activists and, despite the High Line's wealthy patrons, feel the need to root the High Line in the mix of communities through which it passes.

    Mr David says this was deliberate: "As a tourist you want to go where the locals go."



    Inclusiveness comes at a price, however. The problem with making the High Line a public park is that, as Mr David and Mr Hammond ruefully admit, they haven't managed to capture much of the value that it has generated for others.

    Property developers have made far more money out of the High Line than its own creators, who now have to find $4.5m (£2.8m) in charitable donations every year to keep it open.

    There is another downside, too. Such developments mean disused lines cannot be once again brought back into their original use.

    "The Docklands Light Railway [in east London] runs on viaducts that were long abandoned," says Hutchinson. "We must be careful not to prejudice potential future railways."

    But if it stays true to the spirit of the original, the next High Line won't be a high line at all - it will be something else, something very unexpected.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-19872874

  14. #764
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    "Waaah! People can see in my window now!!!! I don't... wait, how much?"

    "Really?"

    "Nevermind."

  15. #765

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    The second pic from the bottom gives the illusion that the walkway is moving.

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