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Thread: The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea

  1. #811

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    High Line Maintenance Building


  2. #812
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    New (and appropriate) HL art installation up above the rails near 22nd Street:



    Ed Ruscha
    , Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic, 1977. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Gagosian Gallery, New York.

    Legendary artist Ed Ruscha will make his High Line debut on May 6 with a large-scale mural at West 22nd Street. Based on a work from 1977, Ed Ruscha's Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public commission in New York City. One of his few public art works ever realized, Ruscha’s mural will be hand-painted by a professional mural company. The work combines the artist’s interests in architecture, language, and public space to create a dry and humorous commentary on life in a contemporary metropolis.




  3. #813
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And spring brings a new logo for the HL Public Art program ...


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    Check Out the View from High Above the High Line Phase 3

    by Jeremiah Budin



    Following up its trip to the ruins of 5Pointz, the ANIMAL NY drone ANIMAL Three (the first two met untimely ends) has been unleashed above Phase Three of the High Line, so if you were wondering what that's going to look like, this is one of the better views so far.

    There's no completion date set for Section 3, "located between West 30th and West 34th Streets to the south and north, and 10th and 12th Avenues to the east and west," but when completed it's supposed to have a food stand made from a repurposed boxcar, a kid's play area, and a picnic area.

    Here's What Section 3 of the High Line Looks Like by "Drone" [ANIMAL NY]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...ne_phase_3.php

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    Final Section of the High Line Will Open on September 21

    September 4, 2014
    by Jessica Dailey


    High Line at the Rail Yards, as seen from 10 Hudson Yards. Photo by Max Touhey

    It's official, folks: the third and final section of the High Line will open to the public on Sunday, September 21. Friends of the High Line made the announcement in a newsletter today, pointing out that for the first time, all New Yorkers will be able to continuously walk the 22 blocks from Gansevoort Street to 34th Street, 30 feet up on the elevated park. Designs for this last leg, called the High Line at the Rail Yards, were first revealed in July 2012, and the opening date is set for almost exactly two years after the groundbreaking. Here's what visitors can expect:

    Along the way, you will experience new design features and plantings that will animate this new section of the High Line, with newly planted trees and perennials selected by Piet Oudolf, innovatively designed seating areas, and pathways installed in the High Line's original rail tracks. For the first time, you will be able to walk along the self-seeded grasses and wildflowers that have grown along the tracks in the years since the trains stopped running.



    However, there will still be one chunk of the High Line that remains unfinished: the 10th Avenue spur, where there will be "an extraordinary, sheltered, and vegetated interior room" (that looks like a big grassy bowl). The first Hudson Yards tower straddles this section of the park, so it will not be opening until construction finishes up on the 52-story tower in late 2015.


    High Line at the Rail Yards, as seen from 10 Hudson Yards. Photo by Max Touhey

    Even so, this is a huge deal. The processing of turning the abandoned rails into a public space began 15 years ago, and construction first started in 2006. It's been a long time coming, and even if many New Yorkers think it's too crowded with tourists, it's still exciting to see the final piece fall into place.

    High Line [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...er_21.php#more

  8. #818
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    Upstairs, a Walk on the Wild Side

    Unruly Final Section of High Line to Open

    By ANNE RAVER
    SEPT. 3, 2014


    Todd Heisler/The New York Times

    Slide Show

    When the High Line at the Rail Yards, the final section of the elevated park, opens on Sept. 21, we will no longer have to stop at 30th Street and stare longingly through the construction gate at the Queen Anne’s Lace blooming in wild profusion along the old tracks.

    We can walk out on a wide plaza made of the familiar concrete planks, tapered so that plants appear to be pushing up out of the crevices. It’s the same planking system that flows from Gansevoort Street, a mile south, where the High Line begins in the heart of the meatpacking district, in the dappled light of a birch grove.

    The northernmost $75 million section has the same benches, too — modernist perches, of reclaimed Angelique, a tropical hardwood, and precast concrete, that appear to peel up from the floor.

    But now, they have morphed into picnic tables and even a seesaw for children, as one heads west, along a grove of Kentucky coffee trees toward the river.

    Quaking aspens, their leaves rustling in the slightest breeze, rise out of beds full of sumacs, sassafras and the countless prairie plants and grasses that Piet Oudolf, the Dutch master plants man envisioned here. “It’s still lush, still natural, but we used different trees and other species,” Mr. Oudolf said on the phone from his home in Hummelo, the Netherlands.

    The wild, untouched section is reached only after crossing the 11th Avenue bridge, where a wide central path rises gently over seven lanes of streaming southbound traffic, and lifts the heart with its dramatic views up and down Manhattan’s grid.

    It is a relief to leave behind the old tamed High Line, truly a garden now, complete with a lawn. (Couldn’t lawn lovers just go over to Hudson River Park?)

    After the bridge, the joy is gazing upon unruly plantings, left by the birds or the wind, growing out of the rusted track: chokecherry, laden with berries, milkweed pods bursting with seeds, evening primrose and blazing star, even a crab apple tree fruiting in the middle of a sea of Queen Anne’s lace.

    Working with the designers — James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio & Renfro — Mr. Oudolf had created meadows and shady woodlands, a kind of call and response to the sunny openings and architectural canyons traversed by the entire High Line.

    But now, as the tracks curve westward at 30th Street, there is more of a visceral sense of those freight cars that once rushed straight for the Hudson River, before taking a sharp right turn at the West Side Highway and shooting north to 34th Street. The wide open feel of the plaza at 30th Street quickly shifts to a westward journey. At first, sections of original rail track, with new wood ties filled with bonded aggregate, form a smooth walking path. After the bridge, you find yourself on a path with rusted rails and weathered ties, running along the untouched, self-seeded landscape all the way.

    “We haven’t pruned a thing,” said Tom Smarr, the director of horticulture for the Friends of the High Line, as we gazed at a crab apple tree, heavy with fruit. “We’re going to do very little here.”

    It’s the spirit of the old railroad that Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani wanted to tear down in 1999 when nobody loved it, except for a few graffiti artists and street people, and others drawn to industrial ruins. It was a romantic, forgotten place, but once it became a park, it had to support the weight of the five million people who now flock here annually.

    Most of them think they are walking through a “wild” tapestry of plants that came here on their own. That’s how good Mr. Oudolf is. But, of course, the grasses and fabulous flowering plants and vines, the magnolias and shad trees, the groves of gray birch, are planted and tended by many human hands, not the unconscious random hand of nature.
    “It’s not wild at all,” Mr. Oudolf said. “It’s an introduction to the wild.”

    Apparently enough of us have missed that old sense of the High Line to want a piece of it back.

    “We’ve had a lot of feedback from the community saying, ‘We want to walk on the original tracks,’ ” said Megan Freed, communications director for the Friends.

    But you had better come see it while you can because the Friends call it an interim walkway.

    “A time will come when we’ll have to do some of the things we did on the rest of the High Line,” said Josh David, president of the Friends, “in terms of removing the original landscape, stripping the steel work of lead paint, restoring the concrete” just to make this public park structurally sound and safe.

    Mr. David and Robert Hammond founded the Friends in 1999, persuading the city to see the hulking steel dinosaur of New York’s industrial past as a powerful symbol that could be transformed into a new kind of park, deep in the city, yet hovering above it.

    “I think for Robert and me and a few people who did spend a lot of time up in the original landscape, there will be a nostalgia for that lost place, which is one reason that the rail yard section is so exciting to us,” said Mr. David, who sat down next to Mr. Hammond at his first community meeting 16 years ago, because he thought Mr. Hammond was cute.

    The new section also responds to another frequent request from the community: more activities for children.

    “I was behind a family the other day, and the kid kept saying, ‘Can we go now?’ ” Mr. Smarr said on our afternoon walk.

    Now, a section has been cut out of the steel structure, so that children and adventurous adults can explore the maze of girders and beams (covered with thick rubber safety coating).

    The Rail Yards section affords a whole new set of experiences. People can look down on the expanse of commuter trains lined up below in Hudson Yards. They can eventually walk east, at 30th Street, beneath a vast colonnade to a forested spur that will span 10th Avenue. Coach is building the first of the skyscrapers that will hem in the sky, as the 26-acre, $15 billion Hudson Yards district proceeds.

    All the more reason to enjoy the Rail Yards section of the High Line now.

    “Something magical happens closer to the river,” Mr. David said.

    It’s magical where the so-called weeds grow, too. Why make it an interim path? There are so many plants on the rest of the High Line, you have to look hard even to see the tracks.

    Mr. David thought about that for a moment. “In theory, you could let it happen all over again,” he said of those plants that grew on their own, between the tracks. “Do the repairs, put the gravel ballast back and let it happen, like it did before.”

    He didn’t think New Yorkers would want to wait around for that.

    But I say: Let them wait. Here’s a little piece of the wild High Line worth keeping.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/07/ar...s&emc=rss&_r=1

  9. #819

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    It’s magical where the so-called weeds grow, too. Why make it an interim path?
    Because this section of the highline is in an area of Manhattan with some of the least amount of true park space (and just leaving the weeds won't cut it here).
    Leaving this section the way it is would be a big disservice to the residents of the area. Hell they already chopped down the best
    of what was already growing wild there anyway- a large grove of apple trees on 34th right where the highline begins.

  10. #820
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    High Line Opens Last Section With Adrian Villar Rojas Sculptures

    'The Evolution of God' Incorporates Sneakers, Watermelon Rinds and Even an iPod Into Its Design; 'This Is the Primordial Soup'

    By Andy Battaglia


    Adrián Villar Rojas's 'The Evolution of God' opens Sunday along with the final stretch of Manhattan's High Line.
    Timothy Schenck

    To the list of construction materials currently in use along the fast-rising High Line, add the following: potatoes, sprouts, beans, sneakers and watermelon rinds.

    Mix them all together with soil, cement or clay, and the elements are in place for a public art project opening Sunday on Manhattan's far West Side.
    Over the summer, the High Line at the Rail Yards—a stretch of the elevated park between 30th and 34th streets that also opens to the public for the first time Sunday—played host to the Argentine artist Adrián Villar Rojas and a team of collaborators who liked to get their hands dirty. The results of their work are 13 stylized cubes that look like they were dug up from the ground.

    View Slideshow

    "This is the basics of life on earth," Mr. Rojas said during the installation of the sculptures, which weigh around two tons each. "Inside you have all these tiny things that are happening, going back to billions of years ago when the first primitive organisms appeared. This is it. This is the primordial soup."

    Cecilia Alemani, the curator of High Line Art, offered a different interpretation: "Half of them look like chocolate, no?"

    Mr. Rojas was commissioned in the spring to create the sculptures for the new section of the park, whose landscape, aside from the entrance and a few small exceptions, will remain untouched. The area had been accessible before only to guided tours of "Caterpillar," a series of sculptures made of bronze, brass and steel by Carol Bove.

    For his project, Mr. Rojas turned to more perishable materials, opting for organic matter that will crack, decay and change shape over the seasons. He created his sculptures at the site, which itself changed over the months that he worked.

    In June, it was empty. By July, parts of the Rail Yards had been fitted for walkways and benches.

    In August, the entrance took on the familiar look of the stretches of the High Line farther south. All the while, luxury construction abounded on blocks nearby, with 10 Hudson Yards, the so-called Coach Tower, rising up and attaining skyscraper status.

    Mr. Rojas grew fond of the clamor, he said. "I couldn't think of a better landscape to contrast the two situations. It's a sort of symbolic equation of how past life and contemporary life meet."


    The installation in progress. Timothy Schenck

    He used clay and cement as the main structural materials in the cubes, then added elements like seeds and vegetable matter strategically placed to sprout from within the sculptures themselves. The germination will reflect the wild vegetation of the Rail Yards.

    "We had to be respectful of the weeds," Ms. Alemani said of the sculpture-making process, which enlisted Mr. Rojas along with three studio assistants from Rosario, Argentina, where he is normally based, and 10 workers hired by the High Line. They mixed the materials in wooden boxes, removing the supports once the sculptures dried.

    On a hot day in July, with tourists gathered by the locked gate trying to steal a look in, Mr. Rojas, in town on one of several trips from Argentina, reflected on the process of making the sculptures, which he titled "The Evolution of God."


    Finished pieces of Mr. Rojas's work on the High Line. Timothy Schenck

    "It has this kind of childish attitude, playing with mud and soil, vegetables and seeds," he said. "We humans have a super-strong connection. Our first moments as hominids and homo sapiens were all linked to a relation with nature and agriculture and farming. The moment you work with soil, you feel some sort of pleasure in reconnection."

    "I think the world of nature is much closer to him than most artists," said Marian Goodman, whose gallery represents the 34-year-old Mr. Rojas. "He's very well able to live in that space between culture and nature."

    Along with the organic materials, some of which have already rotted away and left gaping spaces, Mr. Rojas incorporated a few synthetic components, including old sneakers, shirts and even an iPod. Some are barely visible, but they add a human element to an artwork with a complex relationship with the natural world.

    "A cube is a very comforting shape for us," Mr. Rojas said. "It's controlled, perfect—it comes out of the human mind. A cube you don't find in nature. A cube needs mind power to create an abstraction. And inside this comforting cube, this huge mess is going on. How are we going to deal with this?"

    Adrián Villar Rojas's "The Evolution of God" opens Sunday at the High Line at the Rail Yards.

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/high-...076002?tesla=y

  11. #821
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    So let me get this straight, the third section of the high line is temporary? Or am I misreading the article.

    Seems odd to spend so much only to have a temporary solution. I guess no one learned anything from the PA.

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    ^

    “A time will come when we’ll have to do some of the things we did on the rest of the High Line,” said Josh David, president of the Friends, “in terms of removing the original landscape, stripping the steel work of lead paint, restoring the concrete” just to make this public park structurally sound and safe.

    Say Hello to High Line at the Rail Yards, the Park's Final Leg

    by Zoe Rosenberg



    The third and final stretch of the High Line will open to the public tomorrow, marking the end of a 15-year development saga, and availing to pedestrians a seamless 22-block stretch between Gansevoort and 34th streets. Known as High Line at the Rail Yards, the park's final portion stretches from 30th Street and Tenth Avenue, cuts west, and curves north to 34th Street near the West Side Highway. Just one portion of the 1.45-mile-long park, the Tenth Avenue spur, is inaccessible and will remain closed until construction of 10 Hudson Yards is complete in 2015.



    10 Hudson Yards is the first tower to rise at the eponymous development. The 52-story Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed building straddles the portion of High Line at the Rail Yards known as the Tenth Avenue spur, where there will be "an extraordinary, sheltered, and vegetated interior room" (spoiler: it looks like a terrarium out of Honey, I Shrunk the Kids). The spur will open with the tower in 2015.



    Looking west.



    Visitors can walk along the original freight line.



    Like the two phases before it, High Line at the Rail Yards is designed by James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Piet Oudolf.







    Adrián Villar Rojas's 13 sculptures for High Line at the Rail Yards are all made of compressed perishable materials and are meant to weather and decay over time.



    In a few years when the platform is complete and Hudson Yards rises, the name "High Line at the Rail Yards" will be antediluvian. While the rail yards will still exist under the new neighborhood, they'll no longer comprise the High Line's landscape.




    Ladies and gentleman, the end—the very, very end—of the High Line.


    This area will be unrecognizable in a few years.

    Construction on the High Line first began in 2006, so tomorrow's opening is a momentous final chapter for the ambitious public-private venture. Despite the project's maturity, the addition of the third stretch still feels special, expressly in due to its intimate spatial relationship to the rail yards and the impending Hudson Yards mega-development. The third portion opens slightly over two years following its announcement and 34 years following the last use of the cargo train whose tracks are now home to what some hail as the best park in the city, and as a pioneer and triumph of urban regeneration.

    Final Section of the High Line Will Open on September 21 [Curbed]
    High Line [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0..._final_leg.php

  13. #823

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramvid01 View Post
    So let me get this straight, the third section of the high line is temporary? Or am I misreading the article.

    Seems odd to spend so much only to have a temporary solution. I guess no one learned anything from the PA.
    I hate to say it but I hope this last section is temporary. Just went for a walk this morning and while the east/west bound section at 30th street is a good addition, I don't know what happened along the final section that runs north/south. It's just basically an asphalt path. Very disappointing if this isn't better developed over time.

  14. #824

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    ^^ And I'd hope they'll keep this section like this. Seeing it this wild and minimally touched is more beautiful/interesting in my view.

  15. #825

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    Not if you lived in the area and this was about the only green space it had to offer.
    (Hell even HRP is basically non existent along this stretch).
    After all the anticipation upon seeing how wonderful the first two sections turned out,
    It would be a crime if our end permanently turned out to be nothing but a strip of weeds along a path of asphalt
    (now there is even less of the former, and more of the latter).
    And this is far from minimally touched, they cut down most of the best wild parts (a variety of trees etc.) that were already growing,
    but in the way of the path.

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