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Thread: The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea

  1. #826

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    I think the photos of the section make it look better than what it feels like in person. Standing on this asphalt path with a bed of weeds next to you has to make one wonder if Diller Scofidio called this one in. It's almost void of any creativity and like was said above, none of the growth is of significance in this area. Standing up there on that asphalt without any trees during a hot NYC day will not make anyone a fan of the Highline.

    If this is the most expensive park per acre in history (costing $35 million for this section alone) as was reported in the NY Times then we should all be asking about the judgement of Friends of the Highline.

    There is very little to be appreciated about this northern strech. I'm very disappointed and just hope that this mistake is fixed sooner than later.

  2. #827

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramvid01 View Post
    So let me get this straight, the third section of the high line is temporary? Or am I misreading the article.

    Seems odd to spend so much only to have a temporary solution. I guess no one learned anything from the PA.
    In the practical aspect, it makes sense to make minimal changes. The present design is temporary; the final design will happen when the western yard is built out, but that might not be for a decade or more. So it's not like it'll be closed again for construction in a couple of years.

    And what should that final design be? Does anyone know how Hudson Yards along 12th Ave will look when complete? For one thing, the yard is at street level at 12th Ave, so the decking will be at or near the level of the High Line. Better to let the park and neighborhood evolve together.

  3. #828
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    Both Critics and Visitors Love The High Line's Rugged Last Leg

    by Hana R. Alberts



    https://twitter.com/benbrooksny/stat...965633/photo/1



    https://twitter.com/garymanalus/stat...297154/photo/1



    https://twitter.com/WNYC/status/5140...103232/photo/1



    https://twitter.com/stevecuozzo/stat...636608/photo/1



    https://twitter.com/Architizer/statu...505730/photo/1

    More pictures and comments


    The High Line's third and final phase opened yesterday, a triumphant occasion that ended 15 years of planning and development on a high note. On social media, visitors and news outlets shared photos and videos of the new span, which stretches westward from the prior end point at 30th Street, curves around the Hudson Yards site while staying parallel the West Side Highway, and then juts back east to end, finally, at 34th Street. At the same time, architecture and urban planning critics are singing its praises: from such disparate viewpoints as Michael Kimmelman at the Times ("If the newest, last stretch of the High Line doesn't make you fall in love with New York all over again, I really don't know what to say") to Steve Cuozzo at the Post ("a beautiful but off-limits re-creation of old tracks and wildflowers of the kind that sprang up after the trains stopped running in 1980").

    Vanity Fair's Paul Goldberger calls it "stunningly refreshing."

    New York magazine's Justin Davidson concludes: "The park becomes more playful in its latest incarnation" even as "this whimsy is framed by the original structure's serious brawn. The most stunning features are still the riveted metal plates and tough ornamental guardrails from the 1930s."

    Flickr user Archidose posted a video with this caption: "A very amateurish timelapse from 34th Street on the north to Gansevoort Street on the south." Amateurish or not, it's awesome to see the varied environments one passes from end to end.

    The Climax in a Tale of Green and Gritty [NYT]
    Bravo to the High Line's grand finale [NYP]
    The Final Segment of the High Line Is Stunningly Refreshing [VF]
    The High Line's Last Section Opens Tomorrow, and Here's a First Look [NYM]
    Say Hello to High Line at the Rail Yards, the Park's Final Leg [Curbed]
    All High Line coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...d_last_leg.php

  4. #829

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    I don't think it's been clearly communicated in some of these articles that only a small part of the last segment is completed. The rest is temporary.


    The spur through the Coach building to the "bowl" at 10th Ave, and possibly a connection to Manhattan West.


    The steps at the right appear to be a future connection to Hudson Yards.













    Stairway to the street at 11th Ave.


    The temporary segment begins at the white umbrella in the distance.


    The posters are on gates, which can be closed.





    The structure was stabilized, but for now, the off-limits part is relatively unchanged.











    Landing at 34th St

  5. #830
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    Awesome pics, Zippy, thank you .

    Completion of the High Line and Hudson Yards development is eagerly awaited Down Under!

  6. #831
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    Crit> High Line Segment Three

    Alan G. Brake surveys the remnant landscape of the newest section of the High Line.


    Iwan Baan

    New York’s most glamorous park has taken a humble turn. On September 20, the Friends of the High Line opened the third segment of the now world famous urban promenade. Unlike the first two segments, the third is not technically finished, but the Friends of the High Line have made it accessible, giving the full length of the linear park over to the public (the so-called spur on 30th Street is under scaffolding for the Hudson Yards tower that will be anchored by the fashion brand Coach).

    About half of the third segment has been given the full James Corner Field Operations/Diller Scofidio + Renfro design treatment: The feathered paths with the comb-like concrete pavement, the benches that curve up from the paths, and scattered, naturalistic plantings. This portion runs east-west from Tenth Avenue to Eleventh Avenue. The designers see this portion of the park as a crossroads, and one of the only places where the visitor has a choice of directions. A new alignment of public spaces, including a large plaza by Nelson Byrd Woltz, and the new 7 line stop park by Michael Van Valkenburgh, will form where the line bends at 30th street to the newest segment, creating a view corridor through the massive new development.

    The finished portion retains many of the design elements of the previous two sections.

    Assuming high levels of foot traffic at this juncture, the area has more hardscape than other portions of the park. As you walk toward the river, you encounter a sunken children’s play area cut into the track bed, exposing the beams below, which are covered in silicone wrappers to make them soft and kid-friendly. Lead designers Field Operations, working with Piet Oudolf, have chosen a variety of plants that are meant to activate the senses, including herbs for smell and soft grasses to touch. There is even a “gopher hole” tunnel, where kids can crawl under the planting beds and pop their heads out of an opening in the garden.



    As the Line crosses Eleventh Avenue, the path rises up three feet to take in the views of the traffic and the Hudson River, forming what Liz Diller cheekily calls a “runway,” a nod to the High Line’s reputation as a promenade for the fashionable (as well as the likely relocation of Fashion Week to Hudson Yards). Flanked by benches on either side, the subtle rise—about three feet in total—is effective in altering one’s perception and focusing the viewer on the river beyond. It is the sort of move that has made the park such a landmark development of contemporary public space and landscape architecture.

    At the same time, one senses a bit of exhaustion in the design, particularly with the curved benches throughout, which have been tricked-out in a variety of new configurations: picnic benches, tete-a-tete seating, a seesaw bench, a xylophone version, a crisscross design to encourage conversation. These seemed like an unnecessary bid for novelty for novelty’s sake.

    This may begin to explain why the final portion, a “temporary design,” which curves back north/south and bends down to meet street grade at 34th Street, feels like such a revelation. The simplicity of the temporary section is something of a rebuke to the highly designed and meticulously manicured earlier phases. Passing through a gate that is only slightly more designed than your average chain link fence, the team has created a simple gravel path and left the rest pretty much alone. Here, you encounter the authenticity and romance of the pre-park High Line, the remnant, wild landscape planted by wind gusts and birds. Alongside the path, you see the rusty train tracks and the rough old wood ties, many of which are disappearing into the rocky gravel.

    The landscape is varied and strange and incredibly beautiful.

    The minimalist design here calls to mind something close to Land Art. It focuses the eye and the mind, allowing you to see the object and the city right in front of you in a new way. The West Side Highway, the glittering river streaming with boats on the right, the lines of trains, which will eventually be decked over for the Western Rail Yards, fascinate. The new neighborhood rising behind is a testament to the city’s power, wealth, and brutal voraciousness. The path itself is embellished only twice along the four-block stretch, with two large seating areas, one “the beam bench,” made from reclaimed pieces of the steel beams saved from earlier phases of the renovation, and a bleacher-like pile of massive squared off log

    Past this point, the path is entirely paved, and quickly becomes too hot on even moderately sunny days.

    As the High Line meets the ground, unceremoniously and somewhat unexpectedly, midblock facing the side of the Javits Center, the designers preserved a glade of wild Aspen trees and added a few benches, which are sure to be popular with the throngs who wait on the sidewalk for the Megabus coaches.

    There is currently a master plan to finish the temporary segment to the level of the other portions. That would be a mistake. The public deserves to see this piece of the High Line as it was. It was the power of the remnant landscape that became the reason for the preservation of the elevated line itself.

    James Corner, for one, seemed open to preserving some or all of the truly wild. “The strategy was budgetary, but maybe it is finished,” he said.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articl...1#.VFzVyMm0S4c

  7. #832

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    There is currently a master plan to finish the temporary segment to the level of the other portions. That would be a mistake. The public deserves to see this piece of the High Line as it was. It was the power of the remnant landscape that became the reason for the preservation of the elevated line itself.
    NO WAY! It would be a mistake NOT to bring it up to the other levels...although it may bear some small resemblance, this piece of the high line is NOT "as it was".
    It was manicured all to hell to look wild, and they removed the wonderful apple trees from the 34th st. portion.
    Good idea in theory but a mistake none the less.
    This immediate area is in VERY DIRE NEED of park space- decent park space- not more weeds and hot asphalt.

  8. #833

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    A most excellent documentary (2014) Great Museums Elevated Thinking: The High Line. Much detail, including history, conception, planning, construction, art installations (allowed for one year), plantings which, though they may seem wild, are actually very methodically arranged. Also how people approach and move through different parts of the Line, and what attracts them to different aspects of it. Really interesting and very nicely produced.

    Neat aside: There are still buildings there with loading docks along the route where the trains used to unload, and the meat hooks are still hanging there.


    Last edited by mariab; December 13th, 2014 at 05:47 PM.

  9. #834
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    That was awesome! Thanks for posting, mariab.

    The involvement of the children is wonderful. The fire escape performances were really cool!

    What say you now, Giuliani?

  10. #835

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    Any time. Giuliani has said at different times that he's glad he was wrong on both the 9/11 Memorial as well as the High Line. While many may have felt the way he did at first, he was in a dangerous position where he could have weighed heavy on the final decisions and I'll bet most are glad he didn't. He originally said the WTC site should be strictly a memorial, and that the High Line should be torn down. While I didn't agree on the memorial, I would have taken one look at the decrepit old line and wanted it torn down, and I'm glad I was wrong. The High Line is like the open space version of found money.

  11. #836

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    A cold morning on the High Line








  12. #837

  13. #838

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    I'm only two months late on these, but why not.


















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