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Thread: Hudson River Park

  1. #31

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    the 550-acre park is only half finished.
    I know thisis not meant to be exact, but the park is not nearly half finished. Only one of seven segments is fully complete. Two short piers were recently completed in segment 7 (W57 St). The area at pier 84 (south of Intrepid) is fenced off waiting construction. Work on the ferry terminal at pier 79 (Lincoln Tunnel vent) is progressing. The MTA has moved out of pier 57 (W15 St), and RFP has been issued.

    That's it.

  2. #32
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I think I hear heels dragging.

    Nah, it's just the wind.....

  3. #33
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Mr. Butzel and others complained that to offset the lack of money, the trust has sought other revenue from commercial development, which is often incompatible with the plans for the park.
    Well...at least is better than nothing :roll:

    Charles E. Dorkey III, chairman of the trust, said yesterday that the agency was building Clinton Cove Park, between 54th and 57th Streets,
    The more they built the park...the more new construction will happen. I have noticed alot of activity around that area.

    and hoped to begin construction of Pier 84 at 42nd Street next spring.
    I can't wait to see Pier 84 being built. It makes sence since there are alot of new residential buildings in that area. Who knows it might spruce up more development.

  4. #34
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    This will get done sooner or later. It's an amazing asset for all the city and will continue to be a residential catalyst in the area. Someday, not too far away, NYC will be known for it's waterfront access, parks, and activites (I hope).

  5. #35

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    Park Frozen As City Trucks Blockade Pier

    by Blair Golson

    Park advocates are charging that the city’s Sanitation Department is unlawfully squatting on a West Side pier that should have been demolished three months ago to make way for the northern end of the Hudson River Park.

    The postponement threatens to further derail the long-delayed plan to create a five-mile, 550-acre waterfront park from Battery Park City to 59th Street, the city’s largest open-space project since the creation of Central Park in 1853.

    For years, the Sanitation Department has used Pier 97 at West 57th Street as a marshaling yard for its trucks and a depot for street salt. But according to state legislation, that property should have been turned over on Jan. 1, 2004, to the Hudson River Park Trust, the city/state agency tasked with building the park. The entire park had been slated for completion in 2003, but to date the trust has finished just one of six segments—in Greenwich Village. Furthermore, the trust recently spent the last of the $200 million that the city and state had committed for the park’s creation in 1992, and it will probably need a minimum of $200 million more to complete it.

    To pay for the renovation of Pier 97, the trust has to once again hit up the city or state for additional funding, a request it cannot make until the Sanitation Department vacates the pier. The Sanitation Department can’t vacate, however, until it completes the long-delayed construction of a new facility at a site across 12th Avenue, which might not happen for another three years. Until then, the Sanitation Department will effectively remain a squatter on the trust’s property. And, in the meantime, construction on yet another piece of the long-overdue park will continue to stagnate.

    "I’m just this side of total despair," said Ross Graham, co-chair of the Friends of Hudson River Park, a civic advocacy group. "I don’t want to create a furor on city and state levels, but I would like [the Sanitation Department] to think they must be more responsive and try harder to find a way to resolve this problem."

    Tom Fox, who was one of the driving forces behind the park’s creation (and who’s also president of the New York Water Taxi ferry service), said he and other park advocates joke, somewhat morbidly, that "they’ll be wheeling us in our wheelchairs" by the time the park is finished.

    Ever since 1998, when Governor George Pataki signed the Hudson River Park Act into law, the Sanitation Department has been on notice that it would have to relocate its Pier 97 facility by Dec. 31, 2003. Almost six years later, however, construction crews are just now beginning to excavate dirt from the relocation site.

    The delay can partially be explained by unforeseeable events: The initial demolition contractor had to be removed from the job in 2002 for withholding wages from workers, for example. Nonetheless, some argue that the Sanitation Department has been apathetic and slow to take action, confident in the knowledge that the park’s supposed guardian, the Hudson River Park Trust, is by its very nature unable to take a strong stance against city departments like Sanitation.

    As a city/state agency, the trust’s board of directors contains an equal number of mayoral and gubernatorial appointees—making it effectively impossible for them to do anything without the consent of both the Mayor and the Governor. And while the arrangement appears to achieve its aim of putting a check on rash unilateral actions, it also makes it next to impossible for the trust to take strong action—like filing a lawsuit—against a city-controlled department like Sanitation.

    "It’s unlikely that a board of directors that is half-controlled by the city is going to vote to sue the city," said Albert Butzel, president of the Friends of Hudson River Park.

    The same principal seems to apply when it comes to getting the trust to pressure the Sanitation Department to pay rent for its pier-squatting—an option that Mr. Butzel has proposed.

    "The idea that the Sanitation Department should pay rent is not something that the city wants to do," said Mr. Butzel. "Therefore, the city’s representatives on the board of the Hudson River Park Trust are not going to support a motion where the trust asks for that kind of relief."

    Christopher Martin, a vice president of the trust, released the following statement to The Observer via e-mail:

    "We know how important Pier 97 is to the community as a recreation pier and are still committed to its reconstruction. In the meantime, we coordinate closely with the Department of Sanitation on its relocation plans and are confident that they are making their best efforts to complete reconstruction of their new garage as quickly as feasible so that the trucks currently located on Pier 97 can be removed and the pier rebuilt."

    Unlike the trust, which effectively can’t file suit against the Sanitation Department because of its city/state nature, the Friends group is bound by no such restraints. But for now, at least, Mr. Butzel said he has no plans to file a suit of his own, though he will reserve the option if the situation begins to deteriorate hopelessly.

    Trust board member Henry Stern, who was the city’s longtime parks commissioner, said the situation at Pier 97 had never come before the board, but he dismissed out of hand the idea of the trust filing suit against the Sanitation Department.

    "If you sue the Sanitation Department, you’re really suing the Mayor, because he appoints the sanitation commissioner," Mr. Stern said. "And neither the Governor’s people nor the Mayor’s people are going to resort to the courts to handle what should be handled within the executive branch."

    Contrary to the claims of some on the Friends, Mr. Stern argued that it is actually advantageous in this situation to have mayoral appointees on the board.

    "I believe the presence of the mayoral appointees on the board, including [Deputy Mayor] Dan Doctoroff, gives us more of a chance to persuade the Mayor to get rid of the Sanitation Department (from the pier)," he said.

    Mr. Stern also said he felt somewhat uncomfortable with the idea of Sanitation paying rent to the trust, as it might not even be legal for the trust to "commercialize" the pier in that way. However, he did add that he wasn’t opposed to having Sanitation compensate the trust in another way—perhaps by using capital budget funds to help pay for the pier’s demolition and reconstruction.

    Mayoral spokesman Jordan Barowitz said the Mayor’s office is engaged in discussions with the trust to expedite the Sanitation Department’s departure from the site.

    "There’s an agreement in place that Sanitation will move into the garage across the street within three years," Mr. Barowitz said. "And in the short term, we have identified some improvements that will enhance access to the park and [solve] some transportation issues."

    The short-term improvements Mr. Barowitz referred to include the Sanitation Department’s purchase of the second of two plots—at 57th Street and 12th Avenue—for their new facilities. The second plot will house some of the trucks that now park on the street next to Pier 97. However, one of the principal reasons the trucks are parked on the street—as opposed to the pier itself—is that construction is currently taking place on the pier. Many of the wooden supports for the concrete structure have deteriorated to the point that they need to be replaced immediately. This has yielded the ironic situation of Sanitation tossing money into a sinkhole to keep up a pier that it isn’t even lawfully entitled to occupy—and which the trust intends on destroying as soon as possible.

    A Long, Troubled History

    The Hudson River Park emerged from the ashes of Westway, the failed plan to build a submerged highway along the Hudson River out of landfill, which would have extended Manhattan’s western border by 1,000 feet. (West Side activists famously killed the project in 1985 by exploiting the dangers that the project might have posed to the river’s striped-bass community.) In the wake of the project’s defeat, West Side activists—many of whom were Westway opponents—proposed as an alternative the grand, landscaped boulevard that would become the West Side Highway and the Hudson River Park. In 1992, after much haggling, Governor Mario Cuomo and Mayor David Dinkins committed $200 million to the project. The park didn’t start in earnest, however, until the Hudson River Park Conservancy, the precursor of the Hudson River Park Trust, finalized a financial and design plan for the entire park in 1995.

    At that point, park advocates on the conservancy were aware that $200 million would cover only about half of the park’s costs, but the group expected to garner other revenue from a variety of other sources: the federal government, development fees imposed on new projects rising up along 11th and 12th avenues, and private contributions.

    In September of 1998, Governor Pataki signed the Hudson River Park Act into law at Pier 25 in Tribeca, where he was flanked by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and community activists. The signing formalized many aspects of the park’s development—parts of which had been underway since 1992.

    "Years from now, this project will be seen as the turning point in the development of Manhattan’s West Side waterfront," Mr. Giuliani said at the time.

    The legislation also ushered the Hudson River Park Trust into existence as stewards of the park. The trust broke up the park’s construction into six segments, from Battery Park City to 59th Street. Aside from the completed Greenwich Village segment and some maritime commerce, like the Circle Line ferry and the Intrepid Air and Science Museum, much of the water frontage still consists of old piers, broken-up concrete and gnarled patches of weeds. (The bicycle/pedestrian path that runs through the park was completed in 1999 by the state Department of Transportation.)

    Almost from the group’s inception in 1999, it seemed to many in the Friends group—who were allowed to attend but not comment at trust board meetings—that the trust wasn’t being sufficiently proactive in going after the sources of revenue that would be needed once the initial $200 million was gone. Their fears proved prescient: To date, just about the only private money has come from developer Douglas Durst, who has a development in the West 50’s, and who made a $1 million contribution to the park fund.

    Despite the trust’s visible progress, over the years the organization has still fallen short of the hopes of many park advocates. In December of last year, The New York Times reported on a public hearing in which Mr. Butzel, among others, criticized the trust for not actively seeking out other sources of funding. Assemblyman Richard L. Brodsky, chairman of the Committee on Corporations, Authorities and Commissions, called the trust "an agency in crisis."

    Most members of the Friends group, however, say they are heartened by the efforts of the trust’s new president, Connie Fishman, who was one of the trust’s longtime vice presidents. Under Ms. Fishman’s tenure, according to the Friends’ Mr. Butzel, the trust has become more aggressive in seeking out sources of funding, and Ms. Fishman seems to be serious about bringing a swift resolution to the Sanitation Department situation at Pier 97.

    You may reach Blair Golson via email at: bgolson@observer.com.

    This column ran on page 1 in the 4/12/2004 edition of The New York Observer.

  6. #36

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    Bike path around 42nd Street, with the Helena in the background. 18 April 2004.





    Hudson River Park's bike path.





    Hudson River Park's Pier 46 on 18 April 2004.


  7. #37

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    My friends and I had a lovely stroll along the Hudson River from Rector ST/Place to Chambers Street. It was heavenly. We felt so cut off from the hubbub of the City. I look forward to a return trip when more of the Hudson River Parkway is completed.

  8. #38

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    Volume 73, Number 52 | April 28 - May 4, 2004

    Trust fund could get more flush with Hillary and Chuck’s support

    Big push is on for funds to complete Hudson River Park

    By Lincoln Anderson

    It’s no mystery the Hudson River Park has a serious budget shortfall.

    The park’s estimated price tag is $400 million, and the $200 million allocated for the park by the city and state — $100 million from each — is almost used up.

    For several years, park activists have sounded the alarm, raising fears that the park’s Greenwich Village segment, which opened last summer, may be the only section that gets built, while the Tribeca, Chelsea and other sections of the five-mile-long park will be left as barren asphalt strips along the waterfront with dilapidated piers unsafe for public use.

    But there could soon be a sea change in the park’s finances. The Hudson River Park Trust, the organization building and operating the park; politicians; and Friends of Hudson River Park, the park’s main advocacy organization, are now all pulling together to secure the needed funds. The fundraising blitz is being waged at all levels of government, city, state and federal.

    Connie Fishman, the Trust’s new president, said that within the past month, New York’s two senators, Hillary Clinton and Chuck Schumer, supported a request by Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki to seek federal funding for the park through the Waterfront Resources Development Act.

    Fishman said the WRDA (pronounced “warda”) bill, which was supposed to have passed last year, is still in committee in the Senate. The House passed its own version of WRDA last year. The Trust doesn’t anticipate getting the full amount but hopes for something.

    “The request was for $115 million,” said Fishman. “They won’t give you that much — but why not ask?”

    Privately, some say it’s realistic to expect the park might get $20 million from WRDA.

    There is no request for funds for Hudson River Park in the House version of the WRDA bill, which was passed last year.

    “The governor’s office asked us the night before the bill was going to go to the floor if we could put a request in — but it was just too late,” said Jennie McCue, a Nadler aide. “Congressmember Nadler is very supportive, but there wasn’t enough time.”

    McCue said the Senate should consider the WRDA bill in the next few weeks, and the two versions of the bill will then be conferenced to iron out the differences, during which time Nadler will try to get the request for Hudson River Park into the House version.

    “Congressmember Nadler will do all he can to get it into the bill,” McCue said.

    In 2000, Pataki wrote a letter in support of getting WRDA funds for the park, but it didn’t pan out. Some questioned then how hard he pushed for the funds.

    Asked how much more money the Trust needs to finish the park, Fishman said $200 million.

    The Trust has also requested $70 million from the Lower Manhattan Development Corp., the agency doling out money for post-9/11 recovery and rebuilding projects, to build the park’s Tribeca segment.

    “We’re just waiting to hear,” Fishman said of the L.M.D.C. request. “They haven’t put us on their monthly agenda, and without being on their monthly agenda, they can’t vote on it.”

    Joanna Rose, an L.M.D.C. spokesperson, said of the Trust’s request, “It’s under consideration.” Rose noted the L.M.D.C. already made a commitment of $25 million for 12 park projects in Lower Manhattan, for restoration of existing park spaces and building new parks. Asked whether the Trust’s request for the Tribeca segment would be heard at the corporation’s May 27 meeting, she said she couldn’t say.

    Albert Butzel, president of Friends of Hudson River Park, said the lobbying effort has also been occurring at the city and state levels. Under Speaker Gifford Miller, the City Council has come out strongly for the park, allocating $50 million for the project in its current budget. Meanwhile, the mayor, who announced his budget Monday, has allocated $10 million for the park. The Council and mayor must reconcile the two amounts in the final budget. Butzel hopes Mayor Bloomberg ups his ante.

    “It would be nice to get it up to $50 million, but if it was $20 million, that would be nice,” offered Butzel.

    In the state budget, where more legislative bodies negotiate on the budget, expectations are a bit lower for Hudson River Park funds. Like the mayor, the governor in his budget has proposed $10 million for the park. The State Senate has also budgeted $10 million for the park. Butzel said the Friends are lobbying Pataki and Senate Majority Leader Joe Bruno to bump up this amount, hopefully to at least $15 million.

    As for the L.M.D.C. funds for the Tribeca segment, Butzel said, “We’re all expecting it to come. But the longer the wait, the more the concern. We’ve been waiting two years.”

    Butzel said the full-court press for funds, especially federal funds, comes from necessity.

    “Now the park has no money — everyone’s behind this,” Butzel said. “For five years, everyone knew they were going to run out of money this year. Now we have two senators there and we have a substantial voice; they’re on powerful committees.”

    Schumer and Clinton also made a request for $25 million for building the Hudson River Park esplanade in the current annual federal transportation bill, but it failed.

    Change at the trust

    The active push for more cash came after Fishman took over as president of the Trust in January, following the departure of Rob Balachandran, the Trust’s former president, for the private sector.

    “Connie is doing a good job,” said Butzel. “The fact that she’s been down to meet with Schumer and Clinton’s staff is terrific. It’s going to take time, but I finally think things are finally back on track. Connie, when she came to our board meeting, said her priority is to get the park built.”

    In the past, the issue of requesting federal funds was problematic because of fears it would require an environmental impact study under the National Environmental Review Process. The study, it was feared, would slow down the start of construction on the park.

    Nadler made waves in 1998 when he advocated seeking federal funds for the park, for which he said a federal E.I.S. would likely be needed. Park advocates were angered, fearing a lengthy study.

    Said Linda Rosenthal, a Nadler aide, “Jerry was trying to get the funds and the governor and the Trust said No because there would be another E.I.S. Even if it caused another E.I.S., the E.I.S. would have been done by now. We didn’t think it would have necessitated an E.I.S.”

    “That was a long time ago,” said Butzel, recalling the disagreement with Nadler. “We wanted to get the park going. It’s different now: They’re working through the Senate, the park is a lot further along, the governor is behind it — there’s a lot more coordinated effort.”

    Four years ago, the Army Corps of Engineers, before issuing a permit for the park’s “in-water” work — rebuilding of the piers and bulkhead (seawall) — had to determine if a full-scale federal environmental impact study would be needed. The Corps found the park’s impact would not be significant and only required a relatively short environmental document to be done. As a result, based on the Corps’ previous ruling, Butzel said, if park funds are allocated under WRDA, it’s unlikely a major federal E.I.S. would now be required.

    Then there are also the major piers that are to be redeveloped by private developers. Butzel said there are hopeful signs at Pier 40, the 15-acre pier at W. Houston St. He said he believes the Trust is looking to issue a request for developers for the pier by the end of the year. The Trust’s last effort to redevelop the pier with a park ended last year without a developer being chosen. Also, a developer is expected to be chosen for Pier 57 in Chelsea by this summer.

    Chris Martin, the Trust’s spokesperson, did not respond to questions about Pier 40 by press time.

    Fan of federal funds

    Tom Fox, who was the first president of the Hudson River Park Conservancy, the Trust’s predecessor, from 1992-’95 and who was on the early planning committees for the West Side waterfront’s redevelopment, said he called for federal funds as early as 1986.

    “We assumed early on that it would be $100 million, $100 million and $100 million — from the city, state and federal government,” Fox said.

    However, he recalled of the former opposition to funds from Washington, “There was fear of NEPA, and there was still controversy over the park and there was a reluctance from the city and state to have the feds involved.”

    Fox had another idea to generate revenue for the park that never got adopted: a tax on inboard real estate value in the area between 14th and 59th Sts. and 12th and 10th Aves. This tax of $3 to $5 per sq. ft. would have been an assessment on the amount real estate would have benefited from being near the new park, and would have applied to the new high-rises, for example, now sprouting on the Village waterfront.

    “You’re seeing this with Greenwich Village right now,” said Fox. “There would have been a park tax, if you will, where we could capture some of the appreciation that would be happening as a natural effect of the park.”

    Fox, who today runs New York Water Taxi and is a Friends board member, estimates this tax would have netted the park $80 million to $100 million.

    Nevertheless, his hopes are high the Trust is at last taking the right approach for getting the rest of the funding.

    “Connie now is taking a very active role in going to Washington and pleading her case,” Fox said. “It just didn’t happen before. She’s doing a very good job.

    “But,” he added, “it ain’t over till it’s over —Where’s our L.M.D.C. money ?”


    EDITORIAL

    Hudson River Park’s future is looking brighter

    For years there has been growing concern among Hudson River Park activists that the funds for the park’s construction were running low. Now, the park’s funds have almost run out.

    Going back to previous administrations, the city and state pledged $100 million each for the park, and that money was allocated. Last summer, the Greenwich Village segment of the park, costing $59 million, was opened; thus far, it remains the only section of the five-mile-long park to have been built.

    There is money left to construct some Uptown portions of the park, which stretches from Chambers to 59th Sts., but there is none on hand to build the Downtown sections in Tribeca and Chelsea.

    However, things have started to look brighter since January, when Connie Fishman took over as president of the Hudson River Park Trust, the organization building and operating the park. Most notably, the Trust has reached out for federal funding in a major way. The Trust — along with Friends of Hudson River Park, the park’s chief advocacy and lobbying group — prevailed upon Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki to get Senators Hillary Clinton and Chuck Schumer to request $115 million for the park in the Water Resources Development Act.

    Seeking to obtain federal funds is a departure for the Trust, which in the past was reluctant to do so. The Trust, and others, including the Friends, feared the possibility that a lengthy environmental impact study would be required to get federal funds. However, the Army Corps of Engineers’ assessment four years ago, when reviewing whether to issue permits for in-water work for the park, that a full E.I.S. wasn’t needed indicates a federal E.I.S. would likely not be required if WRDA funds are indeed allocated.

    To come back up to date, we hope Senators Clinton and Schumer will do everything in their power to secure as much of the requested $115 million as possible.

    On another front, it’s high time the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation decide on whether to grant the Trust’s request for $70 million to construct the park’s Tribeca segment. We’re aware there’s great demand on the L.M.D.C.’s remaining $1 billion, with the strongest call coming from backers of improved rail links from J.F.K. and the Long Island Rail Road to the Financial District.

    While creating better connections and reviving Downtown’s economy is obviously critical, this park project is just what the community needs to spur its rebirth after 9/11. It’s a project that fulfills exactly what the L.M.D.C. is charged to do.

    Things were looking bleak for Hudson River Park for a while. But if the WRDA and L.M.D.C. funds come through, the outlook will change 180 degrees. We hope Congress and the L.M.D.C. can appreciate the inherent importance of this project and how it will benefit New Yorkers, and will help move to make the full park a reality.

    www.thevillager.com

  9. #39
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    I suppose the future is bright, but I was looking forward to more completed park and piers around Chelsea nad Tribeca this year. Guess not. Dang these money wasters! (Hooray for the money chasers).

  10. #40

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    The park needs a Conservancy. Maybe some of the Perry West residents.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    The park needs a Conservancy. Maybe some of the Perry West residents.
    Agreed. Though I thought the the HRP Trust was essentially that. But if there is no Conservancy, how do they pay for the park's maintainence?

  12. #42

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    As part of the city and state park systems, it will get budget money. Also, some commercial uses (pier 40 etc) will generate revenue. I know we have a thread about this somewhere, the percentage of park maintenance funds that come from donations.

  13. #43
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    You guys know that bow notch between Piers 45 and 46, somewhere around there? The bridge over it has been closed for a long time now; does anyone know what's going on?

  14. #44

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    Here is the list of summer events from FRIENDS OF HUDSON RIVER PARK


    SUMMER 2004 TALKS, WALKS & BOAT RIDES


    Tuesday, June 8th
    Manhattan
    The History of Hudson River Park (Part 1): Lecture and Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    LOCATION: Pier 40 lobby (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park at Pier 40 for an early evening lecture, the first of two on the history of Hudson River Park. Tonight’s program will focus on the Westway Highway project and its defeat, which in turn led to the birth of Hudson River Park. Lecturers include key players in the Westway saga: journalist Jack Newfield, architect Craig Whitaker, and lawyer Mitchell Bernard. The talk will be followed by a 30-minute walking tour of the beautiful new Greenwich Village section of the park. Cost is $5 per person, which includes light refreshments. (FoHRP members will be admitted for free.)

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Tuesday, June 15th
    Manhattan
    The History of the Tribeca Waterfront: Walking Tour
    12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

    Location: Pier 25 (at North Moore Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Franklin Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M20 to North Moore Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park at Pier 25 for a lunchtime walking tour led by the distinguished Tribeca historian Oliver Allen. Oliver will describe some of the historical highlights of the area, from Native American settlements to the Washington Market to the heyday of the Tribeca piers. A light lunch will be available. For those who have time, after the Tribeca tour there will be a walk north to the beautiful new Greenwich Village section of Hudson River Park. Cost is FREE. Please arrive at least five minutes before the scheduled departure time.

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Tuesday, June 22nd
    Manhattan
    The High Line and Hudson River Park: Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

    Location: 23rd Street and 11th Avenue, Southeast Corner
    Directions: By subway, take the C or E to 23rd Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M23 to Chelsea Piers (22nd Street and 12th Avenue) then walk one block east and one block north.


    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park and our co-sponsors, the Friends of the High Line, for an evening walking tour led by architectural historian Matt Postal. Beginning at the corner of 23rd Street and 11th Avenue, the tour will follow the route of the High Line south, and end in the new section of Hudson River Park. During the tour Matt will discuss the relationship between the two projects, their history, and their impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. Cost is $5 for FoHRP members and $8 for non-members. Please arrive at least five minutes before the scheduled departure time.

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.


    Wednesday, June 23rd
    Manhattan
    Sunset Boat Cruise
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    Location: Pier 40 (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park for a two-hour sunset cruise! This relaxing and entertaining evening will begin at the north side of Pier 40, where passengers will embark on the Queen of Hearts, a classic Mississippi Riverboat which can accommodate 350 passengers. The Queen will glide down the Hudson River, into New York Harbor, to the Statue of Liberty, and back to Pier 40. The cruise includes a 40-minute onboard discussion of the maritime history of the west side waterfront, led by Ted Scull of the World Ship Society. The remainder of the cruise is yours to enjoy the water and superb views of the city. Dinner will be provided. Cost: $10 per person (family discounts are available).

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Tuesday, July 6th
    Manhattan
    The Marine Environment of Hudson River Park: Lecture and Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    LOCATION: Pier 40 lobby (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park at Pier 40 for an early evening lecture on the marine environment of Hudson River Park and the estuary. Lecturers include John Waldman of the Hudson River Foundation, Mike Ludwig of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and Noreen Doyle of the Hudson River Park Trust. The talk will be followed by a 30-minute walking tour of the beautiful new Greenwich Village section of the park. Cost is $5 per person, which includes light refreshments. (FoHRP members will be admitted for free.)

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.

    Tuesday, July 13th
    Manhattan
    The History of Tribeca: Walking Tour
    12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

    Location: Pier 25 (at North Moore Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Franklin Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M20 to North Moore Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park at Pier 25 for a midday walking tour of the colorful history of Tribeca. A light lunch will be available. Cost is FREE. Please arrive at least five minutes before the scheduled departure time.

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Saturday, July 17th
    Manhattan
    Lunchtime Boat Cruise
    1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

    Location: Pier 40 (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park for a midday boat cruise! This relaxing and entertaining trip will begin at the north side of Pier 40, where passengers will embark on the Queen of Hearts, a classic Mississippi Riverboat which can accommodate 350 passengers. The Queen will glide down the Hudson River, into New York Harbor, to the Statue of Liberty, and back to Pier 40. The cruise includes a 40-minute onboard discussion of the waterfront history of the lower west side, led by NYC Tours doyenne Joyce Gold. The remainder of the cruise is yours to enjoy the water and superb views of the city. Lunch will be provided. Cost: $10 per person (family discounts are available).

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.




    Tuesday, July 20th
    Manhattan
    The History of Hudson River Park (Part 2): Lecture and Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    LOCATION: Pier 40 lobby (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park and our co-sponsors, the Municipal Art Society and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, at Pier 40 for an early evening lecture, the second on the history of Hudson River Park. Tonight’s program will focus on the advocacy that secured governmental support for the Park and the design and construction of the Greenwich Village section. Lecturers include key players in the Park’s development: Tom Fox, the first President of the Hudson River Park Conservancy; Connie Fishman, President of the Hudson River Park Trust; and Al Butzel, Director of Friends of Hudson River Park. The talk will be followed by a 30-minute walking tour of the beautiful new Greenwich Village section of the park. Cost is $5 per person, which includes light refreshments. (FoHRP members will be admitted for free.)

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Wednesday, August 4th
    Manhattan
    Sunset Boat Cruise
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    Location: Pier 40 (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park for a two-hour sunset cruise! This relaxing and entertaining evening will begin at the north side of Pier 40, where passengers will embark on the Queen of Hearts, a classic Mississippi Riverboat which can accommodate 350 passengers. The Queen will glide down the Hudson River, into New York Harbor, to the Statue of Liberty, and back to Pier 40. The cruise includes a 40-minute onboard discussion of the waterfront history of the lower west side, led by NYC Tours doyenne Joyce Gold. The remainder of the cruise is yours to enjoy the water and superb views of the city. Dinner will be provided. Cost: $10 per person (family discounts are available).

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.



    Tuesday, August 10th
    Manhattan
    The Waterfront History of Chelsea and the Village: Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

    Location: Pier 62 (at 22nd Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the C or E to 23rd Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M23 to Chelsea Piers at 23rd Street.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park and co-sponsors, the Municipal Art Society, at Pier 62 for a lively walk led by NYC Tours doyenne Joyce Gold. The tour will take in the piers from which the doomed Luisitania departed and survivors of the Titanic arrived; the site of New York’s first state prison; the departure of Robert Fulton’s Clermont, the first operational steam ship; and much more. The tour will end with a walk through the beautiful new section of Hudson River Park. Cost is $5 for FoHRP members and $8 for non-members. Please arrive at least five minutes before the scheduled departure time.

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.




    Tuesday, September 14th
    Manhattan
    Greenwich Village History: Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

    Location: Gansevoort Street and the West Side Highway, Southeast Corner
    Directions: By subway, take the A, C, or E line to 14th Street and 8th Avenue, then walk west. By bus, take the M14 to West 14th Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park and co-sponsors, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, at the southeast corner of Gansevoort Street and the West Side Highway for a lively walk led by a distinguished mystery guide! The tour will explore the little-known history of Greenwich Village, including but not limited to the waterfront, and will include a visit to the new section of Hudson River Park and the 800-foot long Christopher Street Pier. Cost is $5 for FoHRP members and $8 for non-members. Please arrive at least five minutes before the scheduled departure time.

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.




    Saturday, September 18th
    Manhattan
    Lunchtime Boat Cruise
    1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

    Location: Pier 40 (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.

    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park for a midday boat cruise! This relaxing and entertaining trip will begin at the north side of Pier 40, where passengers will embark on the Queen of Hearts, a classic Mississippi Riverboat which can accommodate 350 passengers. The Queen will glide down the Hudson River, into New York Harbor, to the Statue of Liberty, and back to Pier 40. The cruise includes a 40-minute onboard discussion of the history of Hudson River Park. The remainder of the cruise is yours to enjoy the water and superb views of the city. Lunch will be provided. Cost: $10 per person (family discounts are available).

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.


    Tuesday, September 21
    Manhattan
    The Manhattan Waterfront by Philip Lopate: Lecture and Walking Tour
    6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

    LOCATION: Pier 40 lobby (at West Houston Street)
    Directions: By subway, take the 1 or 9 train to Houston Street, then walk west. By bus, take the M21 to West Houston and Greenwich Street, then walk west.


    Join the Friends of Hudson River Park at Pier 40 for an early evening lecture, led by distinguished author Philip Lopate, whose recent work Waterfront has received glowing reviews. Phillip will share his views on the Manhattan waterfront, followed by a group discussion. The lecture will be followed by a 30-minute walking tour of the beautiful new Greenwich Village section of the park. Cost is $5 per person, which includes light refreshments. (FoHRP members will be admitted for free.)

    Contact information: contact Friends of Hudson River Park at 212-757-0981 extension 200, email info@fohrp.org, or visit www.fohrp.org. Advance reservations are encouraged but not required.

  15. #45
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    You guys know that bow notch between Piers 45 and 46, somewhere around there? The bridge over it has been closed for a long time now; does anyone know what's going on?
    I know what you mean, they just opened that Crepe stand near there. I don't see any visible reason for having it closed off, I wish they'd fix it already.

    Good list Edward, those $10 cruises look like a good deal.

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