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Thread: Hudson River Park

  1. #46
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    The HRP Board will continue to be paid their ridiculous salaries while the major segments (Segments 3, 6, Pier 40) sit idle. For once, I support that crazy lawyer in the West Village who is threatening to sue again.

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    The Christopher Street Water Taxi stop on Pier 45 is now open. Rode it today.

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    Default Trust trims proposals for Pier 57 down to 4

    http://thevillager.com/villager_55/t...sprposals.html

    Trust trims proposals for Pier 57 down to 4

    By Albert Amateau

    The Chelsea Piers proposal for Pier 57 would offer art galleries, a dance center, a 25-meter indoor pool and a nine-court tennis center.

    The Hudson River Park Trust expects to select a development team this summer to transform Pier 57, the former city bus depot on the Hudson River, into a cultural destination, according to Noreen Doyle, executive vice president of the state and city agency building the 5-mile-long riverfront park.

    The Trust began its two-step selection process last September when it issued a request for expressions of interest for the pier on the Chelsea waterfront and received responses from eight development teams early this year. None of the teams expressing interest has been eliminated, but the Trust last month invited four of them to outline their plans at an April 21 public meeting.

    The Trust’s broad development goals for the 300,000-sq.-ft pier off W. 17th St. are for a combination of “quality park-enhancing” cultural, educational and maritime recreation uses, commercial and noncommercial, according to the R.F.E.I. issued in September.

    “We’re drafting a request for proposals which we’ll share with the Advisory Council before we issue it later this month,” Doyle said on Monday. The Hudson River Park Advisory Council is made up of elected officials, members of Community Boards 1, 2 and 4, whose districts include the park, park advocates and members of the Trust’s board.

    All four teams that made presentations last month proposed to have historic ships, marinas, maritime and environmental programs, art galleries and public space. Two have significant performing arts programs and three have swimming pools.

    One of the four teams, Original Ventures, is a consortium including Hudson Guild — the Chelsea neighborhood settlement house — which proposes to establish the Hudson River Performing Arts Center, with space for music, dance and theater events. Also part of the Original Ventures plan, the National Maritime Historical Society would have a Sea History Maritime Center with revolving exhibits. In addition, Riverkeeper, the nonprofit group headed by Robert Kennedy Jr., would establish its headquarters on the pier with an environmental education and outreach center in the pier head house.

    The Cipriani group’s Leonardo at Pier 57 plan includes an Italian retail, crafts and cultural center, a ballroom that would double as a restaurant and event space and a resort-style rooftop pool.

    The Performing Arts Center would include a two-level auditorium with seating for 2,500 guests and flexible enough to accommodate 5,000 standing. Hudson Guild would develop an incubator arts complex for local nonprofit arts groups and set up an employment center for Chelsea youth in connection with commercial tenants on the pier. Music, theater and television production studios are also part of the Original Ventures project, along with a swimming pool, a marina and berths for visiting historic vessels. Michael Kramer, a Chelsea resident and former member of Community Board 4, is a principal. The design and construction members of the team include HRH Construction, KeySpan and the architectural firms of Richard Dattner, Dan Ionescu and Buckhurst, Fish & Jaquemart.

    Discover 57, a team that includes LCOR Development Services, Bovis Lend Lease project managers, Meta Brunzema Architects, JM Zell Partners Museum Services and DMCD, Inc., a museum design firm, are associated with John Doswell, a member of Community Board 4 and a founder of Friends of Hudson River Park, in another proposal that was shown last month at the public hearing. Brunzema is also a member of Community Board 4.

    Discover 57 would devote the pier to maritime, educational and recreation uses, public space and compatible commercial uses. The Jacques Cousteau Society would establish a visitor center and museum, with Cousteau’s historic vessel Calypso and the research vessel Alcyone as part of the permanent exhibit.

    Also part of the Discover 57 plan, retail shops, art galleries and a 35,000-sq.-ft. event center would be located on the first level, with a smaller event center and a restaurant sharing the roof with public space. A public esplanade would encircle the outside of the first level and the old Grace Line waiting room would be restored and opened to the public. Discover 57 would also have docking space for dinner and excursion boats, a diving shop and teaching center, a marine supplies shop and space for U.S. Coast Guard boats and a Coast Guard classroom.

    Finally, the lower level in the Discover 57 plan would include artists’ studios, gallery space and a hall for visiting exhibits. There would also be museums on the Hudson River and the maritime industry as well as and a National Geographic retail shop.

    Chelsea Piers, which has been running the sports and entertainment complex on Piers 59, 60, 61 and 62 on the Chelsea waterfront for more than 10 years, also presented its plan for Pier 57 at the April meeting.

    The Chelsea Piers plan calls for a row of art galleries, studios and space for on-site art handling. About 40,000 sq. ft. would be devoted to a dance center for high-profile established dance organizations and smaller dance companies. The center would serve for training, rehearsals and headquarters for between eight and 12 companies in collaboration with Dance/ NYC, the local branch of Dance/USA, the national service organization for professional dance.

    Included in Chelsea Piers proposal, a River Arts Center would offer year-round classes in the plastic and visual arts for both children and adults. A 30,000-sq.-ft. aquatics center would have a 25-meter indoor pool with a diving pool. The aquatics center would have special programs for teens, seniors and the handicapped. A 100,000-sq.-ft. tennis center with nine indoor courts, two squash courts and locker rooms would be included in the plan. Chelsea Piers’ plan also includes a co-generation plant on site that would make the pier energy self-sufficient.

    David Tewksbury, vice president of Chelsea Piers, who made the presentation on April 21, said the John J. Harvey, a decommissioned fire ship, and Pegasus, a 1907 tug, would be among the historic ships that would be berthed at Pier 57. A maritime center would accommodate small boats in the Chelsea Piers plan.

    Leonardo at Pier 57 is the plan of the Cipriani restaurant group with Plaza Construction Corp. and The Witkoff Group for an Italian crafts, retail and cultural center.

    The design calls for a two-story pedestrian street lined with Italian shops and crafts. High-end Italian companies are said to be ready to become part of the project and La Triennale di Milano, a museum and gallery, would establish a cultural center on the pier. Casa Sicilia, a Sicilian bureau promoting the art and products of Sicily, would be among the features. Milanostudio a fashion and photo studio in Milan, would also join the project with studios and classrooms.

    Under the Leonardo plan, the Cipriani group plans to operate a restaurant and event space, and MarineMax, a division of Ferretti, would operate a marina and nautical store on the pier. A resort-style outdoor pool is planned for the roof of the pier. The Cipriani plan also calls for parking to address the traffic and transportation needs of the project.

    The second-floor Cipriani ballroom would be available for important community events and the walkway around the perimeter of the pier would be restored with benches and lighting consistent with Hudson River Park design standards.

    Other teams that submitted expressions of interest but have not been invited to make their plans public are:

    Pier 57 Development Corp., a consortium of RW Consultants and MJ Properties, which would create tradeshows, an auction house, catering, ballroom and event space, restaurants and retail, a maritime museum and marina, a greenhouse and a co-generation energy facility.

    Pier 57 Maritime — a team of R2 Electric and Pier 63 Maritime — which proposes open space and public recreation, charter boats and accessory parking, historic vessels, artists’ studios, offices for nonprofit groups, food and beverage cafes and snack bars, catering and events, kayak and canoe storage, boat building and a small boat marina. John Krevey, the principal in the team, currently operates Pier 63 Maritime

    Another group that did not make the cut of four, U.S. Four, Inc., would organize Pier 57 Development Corp. to create a restaurant and cabaret, catering and event space, a theater, artists’ studios, commercial gallery, performance arts education, television soundstages and a public outdoor gallery on Pier 57.

    Also, a team that calls itself The Hub submitted an expression of interest after the deadline but was accepted. However, Doyle said The Hub submission, which included a parking garage with an unspecified number of spaces, along with an educational and scientific center, did not meet any of the Trust’s selection criteria. She also noted that the stand-alone parking use is illegal under the Hudson River Park Act.

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  5. #50
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    Those are nice details. I'm liking the Discover 57 proposal. Seems like the most interesting/fun.

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    They are all nice and would add a lot to the park and area.

    I have to say, though, I like the Chelsea Piers proposal, as it mixes sport, which is important for a park, with galleries, which is important to the city and this neighborhood in particular, with arts, retail, education, and open space. I think it's a nice design and good balance of uses. Plus, it produces it's own energy!

    I think Hudson River Performing Arts Center and the Leonardo are both great and should be pursued elsewhere in the city, perhaps Brooklyn Bridge Park, or elsewhere for this park. Maybe combine the remaining 3 to develop Pier 40 finally!

  7. #52
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    Call me crazy, but why spend millions on a temp development, when you have developers wanting to build the whole project?

    http://thevillager.com/villager_56/c...edforpier.html

    Contracts are issued for Pier 40 field, tennis courts

    By Lincoln Anderson

    The Hudson River Park Trust’s board of directors at their May 20 meeting approved $5.5 million in contracts to build a 3 3/4-acre, interim sports field at Pier 40. The Trust also awarded a contract of just under $900,000 to build three permanent tennis courts by the river at Spring St.

    Citnalta Construction Corp. was the winner of the contract for general construction work for the field at Pier 40, located at the foot of W. Houston St. Citnalta submitted what the Trust deemed the “lowest responsible bid” for the work, $3,072,000. With contingencies, the cost could rise to $3,899,588.

    The field will be 400 ft. by 400 ft., large enough for several different games to be held at once, and will be covered with an artificial grass surface, such as FieldTurf.

    The Trust will pay for the work out of its general funds, plus $1.6 million from the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. that had previously been slated for an ice-skating rink at Spring St. and the tennis courts.

    The Trust shelved the ice-skating rink plan last year after it was rejected by Community Board 2 and Assemblymember Deborah Glick; the tennis courts, initially planned as temporary, will now be permanent.

    The United States Soccer Federation and NIKE are also contributing $250,000 to the cost of building the field. As part of the agreement with U.S.S.F./NIKE, a banner will be displayed somewhere inside of Pier 40’s courtyard, facing the field, and there will be youth soccer clinics held at the pier.

    A contract for electrical work for the field, including an emergency evacuation warning system — necessary as the pier will be receiving increased public use — was awarded to Seven Star Electrical, which offered a bid of $1,420,066.

    A contract for plumbing and construction work in connection with the field was also awarded.

    Connie Fishman, the Trust’s president, said that with approval of the contracts, work would start “immediately” on the field and it will be ready for use by early December. Fishman said the field will be used 12 months a year, and that the artificial surface’s expected lifespan is six to seven years.

    She said it’s clear the field was the community’s top priority for the pier, and that any developer the Trust might bring in to fully redevelop the pier in the future will surely recognize that fact.

    “Having [the field] there will show any developer that this is what the community wants,” Fishman said.

    The Trust’s effort to find private developers for a full redevelopment of the 15-acre pier into a mixed park-and-commercial site failed last year without a developer being chosen.

    In addition, as part of the Pier 40 interim plan, the existing rooftop field will be renovated and a new passive-use open space, also to be covered with synthetic turf, will be built to the west of the rooftop field.

    The tennis courts at Spring St., two doubles and one singles, will be a hard surface, asphalt covered with Har-Tru. Citnalta also submitted the winning bid for this project, at $896,117. With contingencies, the cost for the tennis courts could rise to, but is not to exceed, $1,002,229.

    Fishman said the courts will be free and operate the same way the two tennis courts formerly on Trust property near Battery Park City did: If people are waiting in line to get on the courts, those who are playing must get off after an hour.

    After the meeting, Noreen Doyle, the Trust’s vice president, congratulated Tobi Bergman, president of Pier Park & Playground Association, or P3, a local youth sports advocacy organization, regarding the field. Wearing their “GV” logo baseball caps, several coaches from the Greenwich Village Little League also attended the meeting, eager to see the Trust give the go-ahead for the field’s construction.

    Said Bergman in a statement, “The new fields will be a major improvement for the quality of life for Downtown families, who will for the first time have what almost every other community in the nation takes for granted, places for children to play sports…. The leadership and design staff of the Trust needs to be congratulated for staying with this project as a variety of code issues created unforeseen complications…. In the end, everyone stuck together and that’s why this is happening.”

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    The Christopher Street Water Taxi stop on Pier 45 is now open. Rode it today.


  9. #54
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    Kayaks can be rented for free from the Downtown Boathouse on Pier 26.


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    BIG APPLE FOR THE BIG APPLE

    June 10, 2004

    Donna Karan, the fashion designer, plans to unveil a giant bronze sculpture of an apple designed by her late husband, Stephan Weiss, in Hudson River Park today.

    The sculpture, which is nine feet tall and weighs 6,000 pounds, will be temporarily placed in the park, which is near Mr. Weiss's Greenwich Village studio. Among those invited to the unveiling were Hugh Jackman, the Broadway and film star, and Ralph Lauren. Anthony Ramirez (NYT)

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

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    The apple's kinda cool. I saw them hoisting it into place on Tuesday. Looked pretty good.

  12. #57
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    Donna Karan, the fashion designer, plans to unveil a giant bronze sculpture of an apple designed by her late husband, Stephan Weiss, in Hudson River Park today.
    I am going down early today to check it out. 8) It sounds like a cool thing to take some pictures.

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    Bike path along Hudson waterfront, with Morton Square and Perry West. 12 June 2004.


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    Trapeze School is in session:






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    Excavation for the Segment 3 tennis courts is well underway just south of Pier 40.

    Segment 3 is extremely frustrating. The Trust is hoping (pipe dream) for $70mil from the Lower Manhattan rebuilding fund to get the segment built. If this segment's nice, but temporary, basketball courts, skate park, trapeze bars, batting cages and now tennis courts were surrounded by some additional plantings, masonry and stonework, the Segment could be halfway towards completion by now.

    Instead we'll watch the Trust spend millions on these fillers just to tear them down in the next five-ten years - and - worse - they could be used as an excuse not to build the envisioned ecology-oriented Segment 3 at all.

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