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Thread: Pier 40 - Hudson River Park

  1. #421

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    Hard to believe that pier 40 is almost as big as the WTC site.

    The two biggest 'landmasses' remain undeveloped - Pier 40 and Gansevoort. The only expansive piece that's done is Chelsea Cove.

  2. #422
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Friends of Hudson River Park eye fundraising

    As the Hudson River Park faces a $10 million deficit over the next five years, the advocacy group that has watched over the park's creation is working to refocus its mission to fundraising for the West Side esplanade.

    ... Over the summer, a task force was formed with board members from each organization to delve into Friends taking on an expanded mission. The task force will present its ideas to both boards later this month.

    ... a sanitation facility and heliport must be moved before the park's construction will be done.
    That sanitation facility is on the Gansevoort Peninsula, where Spectra Energy has proposed land fall for a new 30" natural gas line running from NJ under the Hudson River into Manhattan.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    ... the new gas pipeline proposed by Spectra Energy of Houston to run through JC, then across the river and into Manhattan via the Gansevoort Peninsula?
    As now proposed the pipe line would come out of the water at the SW corner of the GP, run ~ 3' underground for the full length of the peninsula (where a "beach" is proposed as part of the future HRP segment there) and then cross under the West Side Hiway. But Spectra must also consider alternative sites for the pipe line, and a stretch of Hudson River waterfront from Gansevoort south towards Pier 40 are shown on the Spectra map.

    Word is that the Friends of HRP are in discussions with Spectra about the gas pipe line plans. No doubt this pipe line would generate some funding for the Park.

    No details of the proposed deal between Spectra <> FOHRP have yet been released.

    CB 2 is holding a public meeting on the matter of the pipe line on October 5:

    Upcoming meetings:

    1. 10/5 – Environment, Public Safety, Public Health – 6:30 PM - (location to be determined)

    Presentation regarding a new proposed gas pipeline from New Jersey to Gansevoort Market.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

  3. #423
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Will Residential Save Pier 40 From Atlantis-Future?

    by Dave Hogarty


    [Pier 40, with a random 30-story building placed on it]

    The board of the Hudson River Park Trust is taking all suggestions to save the park from bankruptcy and it may mean that residential housing and a hotel are destined for Pier 40. Right now, the park's finances and physical structures are battling it out to see who can sink to the most perilous condition. Contributions from the city and state towards the park's capital budget have been sinking, while costs keep rising. The projected cost of repairing Pier 40's crumbling roof and corroded steel pilings is $100 million, according to The Villager, and the park is restricted from taking on debt.

    A number of sports groups that use Pier 40 commissioned a study to explore ways out of the perilous situation, and the most profitable in terms of rent revenue generation was a mix of residential housing and a hotel. The development would be 15-30 stories and approximately 600,000 square feet of space, while keeping 70% of the area of Pier 40 open for public use. The state legislature would have to approve changes to Hudson River Park's charter to allow private development along the waterfront.

    Residential Could Save Pier 40, Study Finds [TheVillager]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...ntisfuture.php

  4. #424
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It's simple. Turn that end strip along the water into rental/hotel space and leave the rest as athletic fields. The view is still great, and if you can afford to tweak the parks so they do not look like usage of old industrial space you might actually attract some visitors that would like a hotel space a bit different than the others....



    Maybe...

  5. #425

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    I'd be disappointed if they actually prefer a 30-story residential tower on the water rather than building kinds of venues that New Yorkers who are outside the Village and who don't play soccer could enjoy.


    I have a problem that their goal really seems to be keeping their community soccer field going and keeping visitor attendance to a minimum . I hope the city does not chip in a dime towards this because no soccer field/parking garage in any other neighborhood would receive such funding.

    Shame that the biggest piece of the park with the biggest opportunity will probably continue to serve so few.

  6. #426
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Hudson River Park hits headwinds downtown

    Some in community voice opposition to plans by the nonprofit overseeing the five-mile greenway to bring more commercial development to generate badly needed revenue.

    By Ken M. Christensen

    With just three weeks left in the current legislative session in Albany, the trust charged with operating and maintaining the five-mile long Hudson River Park on Manhattan's West Side got bad news Thursday night. At a public forum designed to help drum up support for further commercial development in the park, residents were at best skeptical.

    More than 200 people attended the meeting, in the historic St. Paul's Chapel on lower Broadway, to hear the Hudson River Park Trust's pitch. The trust unveiled the results of its recent study, which showed that building apartments and hotel rooms on Pier 40, at the foot of West Houston Street, would provide a high-revenue, low-traffic solution to the park's financial woes. That argument, however, failed to win over many community members.

    "People are fed up in the Village with high buildings going up," said Dave Poster, who has lived in the West Village for nearly half of his 74 years. On the other hand, he went on to note that if commercial development is "the only way, then you have no options."

    Several speakers, however, argued that alternatives do indeed exist. Among those making that point was State Assemblywoman Deborah Glick, whose support is seen as key to the trust's efforts to persuade the legislature to change a 1998 state law that created the park and which forbids a range of lucrative uses of park property.

    "They presented this as the silver bullet," she said. Instead Ms. Glick argued, the city as well as local businesses should chip in to pay for the bills since they have benefited from the park. One way to do that, she suggested, would be to create a Park Improvement District that would be able to tap property taxes on developments sprouting up near the park.

    As for the city's future contributions, she pointed out that the Department of Education uses the ball fields on Pier 40.
    "Ask them how much the city is providing for that," she said.

    Madelyn Wils, the trust's CEO, said Thursday night's meeting was "further proof of the abiding love New Yorkers have for Hudson River Park," but that a creative solution is needed.

    "We need imaginative thinking and cooperation to increase revenue in the park so that we can maintain it in the future," she said on Friday. "Time is of the essence."

    One thing that is not in dispute is the scale of the park's financial needs. For openers, the trust is not only $200 million short of what it needs to complete the five-mile greenway, it also needs over $100 million just to repair decaying piles under Pier 40. The pier, which is located in Ms. Glick's district and is currently home to a parking garage and playing fields, has the biggest potential to bring in revenue. The trust estimates that with changes taken into account in the study, the pier could generate up to 40% of the park's needed revenue in 2022, as opposed to just 6% currently.

    But that also requires changing the 1998 law to extend the 30-year lease limit to attract tenants willing to invest in new facilities and to vary the types of businesses allowed.

    In one important sign of progress, Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, who helped draft the law 14 years ago, recently came out in favor of the changes after reviewing the Trust's new study.

    He also lauded the Trust's accomplishments to date, saying: "The area that we were afraid would develop into a wall of towers is now grass and trees and benches."

    His endorsement, however, drew hisses from attendees, some of whom oppose changes in the law for fear they would open the door to fracking upstate by permitting a natural gas pipeline to be built under the park. At the beginning of the evening, someone draped a long brown painted banner over the second floor balcony that said, "Keep your fracking pipeline."

    If legislation isn't passed soon, proponents will have to wait until January to propose it again.

    "I hope we can show to people that we are not changing what they love about the park," Mr. Gottfried said.

  7. #427
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Bill to save Pier 40 fails

    Legislators couldn't agree on terms that would generate revenue to rebuild the park's aging infrastructure.

    By Theresa Agovino

    Legislation to bolster the quickly deteriorating finances of the nonprofit that runs the Hudson River Park has failed amid disagreements on how to solve the group's money troubles.

    "It is clear at this point there is not enough support to pass a bill that does what needs to be done," said Assemblyman Richard Gottfried.

    The state legislative session is slated to end Thursday.

    The park's bank account is quickly dwindling in the wake of two successive years of budget deficits. Without a cash infusion, the five-mile park will exhaust its reserve fund in less than three years.

    To reverse the trend, the trust sought new legislation to make Pier 40, the park's main commercial asset, more attractive to potential developers by expanding the uses allowed there, as well as the lease term. Two previous attempts to develop the pier have failed. Recently, the trust's president, Madelyn Wils, said Pier 40 might have to close by 2014 unless there is a cash infusion.

    Meanwhile, roughly $118 million is needed just to make basic repairs to Pier 40, a nearly 15-acre expanse with ball fields and a 775,000-square-foot building with offices, sports facilities and a parking garage.

    The trust has raised the idea of allowing residential units and a hotel to be constructed on the pier—two uses forbidden under the law that created the trust. Leaders also hoped the pier's lease term would be extended beyond 30 years. A study commissioned by the trust suggested that an 87-year lease term for its existing space at the end of West Houston Street would be ideal.

    However, the proposed bill was a watered down version of what the trust thought would make sense for the Pier. It didn't allow for either residential or hotel development, nor did it definitely lengthen the lease term.

    Previously, Assemblywoman Deborah Glick voiced doubts about the legislation, saying she thought the effort was moving too quickly. She wasn't convinced that Pier 40's lease term needed to be changed or that its uses had to be expanded. Her support is crucial because she represents the Greenwich Village district.

    However, Ms. Glick said that the legislation would have given the trust $15 million in emergency aid. It also would have received about $7 million from fees on water taxis.
    "I think it was a fair deal," she said. "I don't know why [the Pier] walked away."

    In a statement, Ms. Wils said, “Our continued goal is to create more flexibility in the act to provide the park with a stronger financial foundation while delivering the most amount of park space possible to the community.”

    If a special session of the legislature is called in December, there is a chance the bill could be revisited. Otherwise, legislators will go back to the drawing board next year.

  8. #428

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    What a mess. I'm shocked by the "community" types that think this massive pier should be their private parking lot and soccer field. This is a huge structure with potential to not only provide the park with needed revenue but also offer a range of amenities to people from all over the city and beyond, rather than serving as the youth-soccer preserve of a handful of neighbors. Seems like it should be a fairly straightforward, uncontroversial solution to develop Pier 40 for commercial uses, as has been planned all along... no?

  9. #429
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Pier Pressure

    Hudson River Park restrictions upheld at Pier 40.

    by Alex Ulam


    Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust

    Proposed changes to the state law that restricts development within Hudson River Park have failed to get traction in Albany, leaving a big question mark over the future of one of the city’s most significant parks.

    Facing overwhelming maintenance and repair costs that are burning through its reserve fund, the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) the quasi-governmental agency that runs the park, had sent a controversial proposal to Albany seeking to change the Hudson River Park Act to remove some of the development restrictions, most notably the one against residential development.

    The Trust’s proposal included a study for Pier 40 with potential redevelopment scenarios by SHoP Architects that included residential towers and a luxury hotel. The most significant threat to park finances is the 15-acre Pier 40, the largest pier in Manhattan, which suffers from rusting pilings and a leaking roof that is in the midst of an $8.8 million emergency repair job. HRPT officials estimate that it will cost about $120 million just to fix Pier 40.

    “If we don’t get the state law changed, eventually we will have to start shutting down sections of Pier 40,” HRPT president Madelyn Wils said.

    Some in Albany supported HRPT’s proposal, such as State Assemblymember Richard Gottfried, who introduced a bill to change the Hudson River Park Act in the assembly session that ended June 21. Gottfried says the proposed legislation was a compromise that did not go far enough because it did not include the complete menu of development scenarios.

    “Until about three months ago, I was fully committed to the language that I helped to write in the Hudson River Park Act 14 years ago that prohibited residential development within the park,” Gottfried said. “It has now become clear to me that of all the possible uses that you might put on Pier 40 and Pier 76, housing has about the lowest traffic impact with the highest level of reliable revenue.”

    HRPT’s proposal faced opposition from some community activists and legislators. “The Trust is misrepresenting the degree of the crisis. The immediate needs of Pier 40 and Pier 54 are not beyond the ability of the city and state to address,” said New York State Assemblymember Deborah Glick.

    Wils says that with the current rate of capital maintenance costs, HRPT will run out of money by the end of 2015.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=6167

  10. #430
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It is a shame, but at the same time it is a relatively small facility used by a small portion of lucky people that get access to it through their clubs and such.

    Playing soccer and softball there was a treat, but I could see (even ~8 years ago when I played) the deterioration. They have let it go too far w/o consistent SUFFICIENT maintenance and we are now seeing the emergency repair work starting.

    Although I really like what they have done with the other piers, is it worth it to do the same for this? Would it be cheaper/easier to try and find some other parcel of land in need of demolition/reclamation in the city or have we completely run out?

    Partial demo and repair of P40 might be a lot cheaper than saving that aging hulk. Repairing a space is great, so long as you have the money to keep the area staffed, supervised, maintained and cleaned. Without that.......

    *shrug*

  11. #431

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    might catch hell for saying this but...

    I see the pier as an eyesore that only a few people in the area can actually use (i've never gained access)- and the proposals all seem tailored to keep it that way.
    unless they plan on changing something drastically (food courts or some such that we can ALL enjoy), let it fall into the river.

    Gottfried is also a moron, whose positions I find dubious at best.

  12. #432

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    It is a shame, but at the same time it is a relatively small facility
    15 acres is pretty big for Manhattan.

    Although I really like what they have done with the other piers, is it worth it to do the same for this?
    Since the beginning, pier 40 was unlike the piers already developed. 50% of the area was earmarked for commercial development, as a revenue source for the park. It's more like pier 57.

    These should have been developed first, to put revenue generation in place. After starts and stops for years, pier 57 is finally going through land review.

    And the DSNY isn't going to get off Ganesvoort, which may present other opportunities for revenue, until the garage facility on Spring St is complete.

  13. #433
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    So the thing is it needs to be altered to be viable. It can't just be fixed and kept as is.

    I am with Scum on this in that it IS very private, and until recently, the area was kind of industrial and isolated (the strip made all the difference, although the vent house "park" (HT) was a nice place to sit for lunch at times...).

    And I know you say 15 acres is big... but not when it is broken up into a bunch of smaller areas, or overlapping baseball fields.

    There is no easy solution, and definitely not one that everyone will accept.

  14. #434
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post

    And the DSNY isn't going to get off Ganesvoort, which may present other opportunities for revenue, until the garage facility on Spring St is complete.
    The framework for the DOS Garage is halfway up. The thing is HUGE.

  15. #435
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Trust Considering Shuttering Money Pit Pier 40

    by Dave Hogarty

    Pier 40 at Houston Street is turning into a waterfront money pit for the Hudson River Park, and the trust that controls the entire park is thinking of shutting it down—its playing fields, the parking, everything, all or in parts—to staunch the fiscal drain the pier poses to the entire park. "If it was my decision right now, I would completely cut [Pier 40] off and say ‘Not one more dime goes into that pier, period," said park board chair Diana Taylor at a recent public meeting and reported in The Tribeca Trib. The problem is that Pier 40 is deteriorating—its pilings need shoring up, concrete is crumbling so badly that large sections of parking areas have been cordoned off—and repairs are expected to cost tens of millions of dollars, which would drain the Hudson River Park Trust of all its resources.

    Over the last few years a number of proposals have been floated to shore up the pier's fiscal and physical condition, including a transformation into a circus-like Vegas on the Hudson, the construction of a Major League Soccer stadium, and even developing a 30-story residential tower at the site. Despite the many schemes, nothing has come to pass, and now park trust members are considering the phased shutdown of the Pier to make necessary repairs to keep important community amenities like the playing fields open while limiting the financial damage the pier is doing to the rest of the park.

    Thinking the Unthinkable: Phased Shut Down of Pier 40 [TribecaTrib]
    Pier 40 [HudsonRiverPark]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...er_40.php#more

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