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Thread: Pier 40 - Hudson River Park

  1. #451
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The residential tower plan is dead in the water. Never gonna happen.

  2. #452

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    Tall towers on the water front perimeters of 'high density' city's like NYC is just bad zoning policy. Buildings' need to gradually increase in heigh starting from the waterfront, growing tall toward the center: otherwise no one in town would have long-view vistas out over the water: most everyone would be 'walled in' physically and visually.

    It is a bit like a lady with a beehive hairdo and a gent with a tall hat walking down to the front row of a crowded movie theater: thus blocking the view of those behind.

  3. #453
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Info, talk to the Don.....

  4. #454

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    Still another concept for Pier 40. This one is sort of a "two birds with one stone" thing.

    Michael Sorkin Studio - An alternative proposal for the growth of NYU.


    Michael Sorkin Studio's proposal would relocate NYU's expansion to Pier 40.
    Courtesy Michael Sorkin Studio

    It’s clear that the current plan for the expansion of the main campus of NYU is far from optimal. Construction on the existing residential superblocks will cause years of disruption to the daily lives of residents of both NYU’s housing and of the surrounding neighborhood. And, the inscription of additional building will deeply compromise the formal quality of those blocks, adding mass and density where there is no urbanistic call for it. While we understand the university’s desire to leverage the happy encounters of campus life by adding its new facilities in proximity to Washington Square, we note that many core functions of the campus are already distributed around the neighborhood and beyond and that there is elasticity in the idea of propinquity. Our question to ourselves was whether there were viable alternatives for a non-disruptive, concentrated expansion within a reasonable walking compass of NYU’s center of gravity. We believe we have found one such possibility and offer it as “friends of the court,” sympathetic to the desires of NYU for additional space, admiring of the existing architecture of the superblock sites, and eager to see our neighborhood develop in a way that both preserves and enhances its unique character, a character that immeasurably contributes to NYU’s own remarkable qualities of place.


    This proposal suggests accommodating NYU’s academic expansion at the end of Houston Street on Pier 40, in the adjacent St. John’s Building, and on the legendary—and long deconsecrated—ocean liner S.S. United States (or other obsolete vessel), which could offer dorm, dining, and meeting facilities. Pier 40 has long been a site in search of a use and our scheme offers an opportunity for new university facilities, for a substantial expansion of the existing athletic fields, for other new community uses, and for a revival of our maritime spirit. We’ve designed for an aggregate of academic facilities comparable to those currently proposed by NYU and additional space for student, faculty, and visitor housing in a highly glamorous setting. The Coles Sports Center would be retained at its existing location and the superblocks would also remain as they are, perhaps with modest tweaks.




    Of course, a project like this will be subject to much negotiation and review and does require the removal of the parking currently occupying the pier, a use we regard as thoroughly incompatible with the superb waterfront site. It is also contingent on transfer of all or part of Pier 40 to NYU and the acquisition of the St. John’s building and the S.S. United States, currently the subject of an RFP for re-use and previously floated as a hotel and conference venue in Philadelphia. This plan offers the advantages of non-disruption in the Village, easy access to the central campus, a spectacular location, what might well be a lower aggregate cost to the university, and a revenue stream for the Hudson River Park. While the designs offered here are highly preliminary—the drawings are more notional than architectural—and would need to be carefully contoured to actual uses and configured to reduce flooding risk, the availability of this virtual ready-made is intended to suggest the availability of sound, even superior alternatives to current plans. It is offered in full awareness of the vital role NYU plays in the life of downtown and seeks to conduce an expansion of the university’s facilities that will make a positive contribution both to NYU and its neighborhood. We would be delighted to develop it further.

    Michael Sorkin Studio, Project Designers: Michael Sorkin, Inma Rosas, Jie Gue

    We thank members the NYU Faculty Against the Sexton Plan (NYUFASP)
    for their support but note that this proposal was originated by Michael Sorkin Studio and does not represent NYUFASP’s official position
    .


    Copyright © 2003-2011 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC

  5. #455

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    Yes to the S.S. United States, no to NYU. NYU is probably the only thing worst than the local neighborhood activists.

  6. #456
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Putting a big amphitheater atop the St. John's Building could be very cool.

  7. #457

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Yes to the S.S. United States, no to NYU.
    Even if NYU were interested, which I doubt, acquisition of the SS United States would be problematic at the least, and doesn't satisfy the RFP.

    NYC is in the running for the ocean liner, along with Miami and several other cities. And so is the scrap yard.

  8. #458

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    One of my dream proposals is to have an ocean liner docked on the west side.


    Fingers crossed for U.S.S. Constitution. Maybe someone like Durst can come along and make it happen. The exhibition/event Pier 94 at 55th Street would be a cool location. Pier 76, that has the tow pound and horse stables, is planned to be redeveloped someday into parkland. A bridge over the highway could link the park to the end of the High Line, Javits Center and Hudson Yards. It also would only be a block from the subway.


    franbat

    Famous ship seeks salvation on the West Side
    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...TATE/130419835

    Preservation group seeks to raise $500,000 to keep the largest and fastest American passenger ship ever built out of the scrap yard, and possibly float it to New York as a tourist attraction and museum.
    Last edited by Derek2k3; April 22nd, 2013 at 12:52 PM.

  9. #459

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    Philadelphia is out of the picture as a permanent site, but I think NYC and Miami have the best shot.

  10. #460
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Bill Would Allow the Sale of Air Rights to Raise Money for Pier 40 Repairs

    By LISA W. FODERARO

    Hudson River Park, the five-mile green space and bicycle path on the West Side of Manhattan that has struggled financially in recent years, may have a new source of money as a result of a deal reached in Albany.

    Rather than allowing housing on Pier 40, as some advocates had wanted, the bill would allow the Hudson River Park Trust, the public benefit corporation overseeing development and operations of the park, to sell air rights up to one block east of the park’s boundaries, across the West Side Highway. In the case of Pier 40, one of the park’s revenue-generating sites, the money would help the trust pay for the more than $100 million in needed repair work on its deteriorated pilings and roof.

    The bill, which would amend the act that established the park, has the support of both the Assembly and Senate and is expected to be approved this week. It would expand some of the allowable commercial uses at Pier 40, at Houston Street, as well as others designated for development along the park. In addition to entertainment and retail, developers would be able to build film and television studios, schools, amusement rides and performing arts spaces.

    The park, an unusual state-city hybrid, was meant to be self-supporting through such development, but proposals for Pier 40 have faltered amid community opposition.

    Richard N. Gottfried, the author of the 1998 Hudson River Park Act, said the ability to transfer air rights could reap tremendous new revenue for the park. It was unclear how much the sale of development rights from the park would increase building heights in neighborhoods like TriBeCa, Chelsea and Clinton opposite the park. “Whether we’re talking tens of millions or hundreds of millions, I couldn’t say,” he said on Wednesday. “But the potential is massive.”

    In recent months, the debate over the future of Pier 40, which now contains parking for 1,700 cars and playing fields, has centered on housing, specifically whether expanding the law to allow housing development might be the best way to generate enough revenue to save the pier. Parents of young athletes who use the pier presented a plan that would expand the playing fields there while allowing for two 22-story residential towers on the uplands portion of the site — the strip of parkland between the pier and the West Side Highway. But others, including Assemblywoman Deborah J. Glick, whose district includes Pier 40, balked, saying that luxury housing would ruin vistas and undermine the nature of the park.

    Without Ms. Glick’s support, any bill that would allow housing had little chance of passage.

    Mr. Gottfried, who supports residential development at Pier 40, said the possibility of housing was set aside during negotiations on the bill. “We felt that rather than locking in some unusable language that might not get amended for years, it was better to take the whole topic off the table,” he said. “Hopefully we can deal with it when we come back in January.”

    The legislation includes a mix of other revenue-producing ideas, including new fees for passengers using tour boats that dock at the park and shifting responsibility for liability claims from park users to the state and city. Currently, the trust pays hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in insurance premiums.

    The bill also addresses Pier 76 at West 38th Street, where the city’s tow pound is. The current park act called for moving the tow pound and dedicating half of the pier to the trust for parkland and half to the city. But under the bill, the entire pier would go to the trust, which would be allowed to develop half of it.

    Madelyn Wils, the trust’s president, praised the collective effort on the bill and said the proposed changes to the act “would strengthen the Hudson River Park Trust and allow us to get back on the road to being self-sustaining.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/20/n...irs.html?_r=1&

  11. #461

  12. #462
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    I wouldn't feel comfortable doing that on the Hudson , even in a protected area..

  13. #463
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It is really pretty nice.

    But you have to be fit, it is a LARGE river.

  14. #464

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    NYU has their rezoning. They have no reason to do this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Yes to the S.S. United States, no to NYU. NYU is probably the only thing worst than the local neighborhood activists.

  15. #465
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Possible Deal May Bring Money to Repair Pier 40 in Manhattan

    NY TIMES
    By Charles V. Bagli
    May 15, 2014


    Pier 40, above, is deteriorating faster than originally feared, a report is expected to reveal.
    Photo Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

    For years, Hudson River Park officials have tried to generate funds to repair Pier 40, the dilapidated former cargo terminal at the foot of West Houston Street, by proposing an odd succession of projects on the pier: a professional soccer stadium, a $600 million entertainment complex and residential towers.

    But they all failed to win either community support or financing.

    Now, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s administration and park officials have struck a tentative agreement with a developer to transfer unused development rights from the 14 1/2-acre pier to a site across the West Side Highway occupied by a sprawling building, in return for more than $100 million that would be used to rehabilitate Pier 40, which is crumbling more rapidly than originally feared.

    If a final deal is put in place, government officials and real estate executives say the owners of the four-story St. John’s Terminal Building, which stretches more than three blocks between West Houston and Spring Streets, would demolish the structure in phases over 10 years and build several residential buildings and retail shops.


    A deal to develop the St. John’s Terminal Building, left, could fund the repairs.
    Photo Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

    A string of luxury residential towers and converted apartment houses have sprung up over the past decade in the adjoining neighborhood, once home to working piers, warehouses and factories.

    The proposal, however, would require approval by both the city and elected officials and entail a state-mandated approval process, zoning changes and other concessions. Officials are loath to alienate the community, which has scuttled earlier proposals.

    A spokesman for Atlas Group, an owner of St. John’s Terminal, confirmed the agreement, saying discussions are “focused on solving a longstanding, well-documented problem at Pier 40 through the development of a mixed-use project at the St. John’s site.”

    The two-story, doughnut-shaped pier, which has a large soccer field in the center surrounded by a parking garage, is crumbling. The roof is in such disrepair that sections of the garage, a stairwell, bathrooms and one of three soccer fields have been closed.

    And a new report is expected to reveal that 57 percent of the pier’s 3,500 steel pilings are suffering severe deterioration, up from 38 percent five years ago. The accelerating decline could require closing sections of the pier for safety reasons.

    The report, based on a three-month, underwater investigation by the Halcrow Group, an engineering consultant, will be released next month.

    “More than half the piles are in major or severe condition,” said Madelyn Wils, president of the Hudson River Trust, which owns the pier. “They’re recommending that we start structural repairs as soon as possible.”

    Jerry Russo, a spokesman for the Empire State Development Corporation, expressed concern about the condition of the pier, which is part of Hudson River Park. “The state will continue to work together with the city and local elected officials and community stakeholders toward a viable solution,” Mr. Russo said.

    The pier is one of three areas designated for commercial development, to provide money for the maintenance of the park, which has not been completed.

    Pier 40, like any waterfront park, is battered every day by winds, tides and, in this case, neglect. An electrical system that protected the pilings from rust was shut down during the fiscal crisis in the 1970s.

    The parking garage at the pier was once a key source of revenue for the park, at one time generating more than $6 million a year.

    In recent years, park officials have considered a series of proposals to develop the pier and reap revenue.

    But those plans ran into opposition from local community groups that wanted to preserve the soccer fields and elected officials like Assemblywoman Deborah J. Glick who are wary of any commercial development in what is supposed to be a public park.

    Last year, the State Legislature approved a bill designed to rescue Pier 40 and the park. Under the law, the trust can sell development rights to builders across the West Side Highway, up to one block east of the park’s boundaries.

    Around the same time, the Atlas Group began talking to state officials about the possibility of buying air rights from Pier 40 to redevelop the St. John’s Terminal site. The developer is also seeking the right to build housing and retail in exchange for money to repair the pier.

    Tobi Bergman, a leader of a coalition of sports groups, Pier 40 Champions, called on officials to take timely action. “The neighborhood can’t go back to where we were before we had a place for children to play sports.”

    The proposed project would start at the northern end of the property. The southern portion would have to wait, because of existing leases for warehouse and office space in the St. John’s building.

    Officials say that the proposal would have to go through a state review process, but not necessarily a city-led review.

    Neither Ms. Glick, nor Assemblyman Richard N. Gottfried, an author of the legislation creating the park, had seen the preliminary agreement, although they were aware of the talks.

    Both legislators expressed misgivings about any proposal that did not have a review process that included residents and elected officials.

    “The pier has had problems,” Ms. Glick said. “The air rights was not necessarily my first choice to resolve the problem. But I wanted to make sure that any changes would’ve enabled a more immediate and neighborhood friendly development of the pier.”

    © 2014 The New York Times Company

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