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Thread: Red Hook, Brooklyn

  1. #31

    Default Red Hook Photos

    Here's a couple of of photos of the new Fairway building before they started work on it, and after. And here's some more Red Hook photos; they're mostly industrial shots:

    http://www.angelfire.com/pro2/urban_...apher/RedHook/
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  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by GowanusGuy
    Here's a couple of of photos of the new Fairway building before they started work on it, and after. And here's some more Red Hook photos; they're mostly industrial shots:

    http://www.angelfire.com/pro2/urban_...apher/RedHook/
    They actually did a nice job with it. Adaptive reuse of industrial buildings is awesome.

  3. #33

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    http://www.nypost.com/food/63060.htm OFF THE HOOK

    By ANDREA STRONG

    April 30, 2006 -- IT'S hard to imagine that New Yorkers are willing to brave the subway and a bus ride for much, but the promise of great food in an up-and-coming neighborhood is a powerful motivator. And it goes a long way toward explaining the exodus to Brooklyn's final frontier: Red Hook.

    To be sure, the migration has taken some time. One of the earliest areas in Brooklyn to be settled, Red Hook (originally Roode Hoek) was named by the Dutch in 1636 for its red clay soil and its hook-like protrusion into New York Harbor. By the 1850s, Red Hook was one of the busiest ports in the country, and later became the setting for Arthur Miller's "A View From the Bridge."

    But Red Hook's gentrification has lagged behind other Brooklyn neighborhoods like DUMBO and Williamsburg. That is, until recently. Since 2003, this neighborhood has slowly been changing from blue-collar to bustling culinary destination.

    The most recent (and delicious) reason to make the Red Hook trek is The Good Fork, a snug seasonal American with exposed brick walls and a nautically inspired curved-birch ceiling. It's owned by Ben Schneider (who built the place), and his wife, chef Sohui Kim, who honed her skills at Blue Hill and Annisa.

    Like many business owners in Red Hook, Kim and Schneider live around the corner from their restaurant. "I fell in love with Red Hook because it had the feeling of a Midwestern industrial city with a seaside harbor," says Schneider. "It's this great odd ragtag community."

    While the couple's goal was to open a neighborhood place, they're currently hosting Manhattan diners drawn by word of mouth. It's easy to fall in love with Kim's menu of dishes touched by her Korean heritage and crafted from local ingredients: plump pork and chive pot stickers ($5), pan-seared scallops with shrimp-scallion pancakes, asparagus and soy vinaigrette ($20), and steak and eggs "Korean-style" with kimchee rice topped with a fried egg ($17).

    But before Kim and Schneider opened the Good Fork, they were loyal patrons of Red Hook's pioneer, Arnaud Erhart, who three years ago opened his cool French bistro 360.

    A veteran of Balthazar and a longtime Red Hook resident, Erhart and his chef Rick Jakobson (Daniel, Bouley) scour greenmarkets for their daily three-course $25 prix fixe menu, which lately reflects spring with dishes like chilled sugar snap pea soup with mint and monkfish fricassee with fava beans, carrots, and snowpea greens, alongside classics like steak tartar and duck leg confit.

    While the restaurant has been busy since it opened in May 2003, Erhart is looking forward to the mid-May opening of Fairway market. "Fairway is something that a lot of small businesses have been waiting for," says Erhart. "I think the people I am trying to target are very much the people Fairway is trying to target."

    Indeed, the tipping point of the neighborhood may be the store - a 52,000-square-foot food market set in a restored Civil War-era building with reach-out-and-touch-the-Statue-of-Liberty views.

    "Red Hook is a lost gem," says Howie Glickberg, co-owner of Fairway. "It was one of the few spots where we could get the space we needed, and we're helping the boom of Red Hook by creating 300 new jobs."

    In addition to its line of gourmet foods, dry goods and produce, this Fairway will feature a kosher butcher, an in-house coffee roaster, a 5,000-square-foot room dedicated to organics and, eventually, a second-floor restaurant and café. To help New Yorkers get there, Fairway has contracted with New York Water Taxi for ferry service (tickets cost $5 each way), and will have parking for 400 cars.

    While Fairway stocks its shelves, the community continues to thrive. Residents congregate at the Hope and Anchor, a local joint for breakfast, lunch and dinner (and karaoke) and meet for strong coffee and freshly frosted cupcakes at Baked, a sleek urban bakery. If the sweets give way to a need for something a bit stronger, there's LeNell's, a cozy wine and cocktail shop owned by LeNell Smothers, an Alabama transplant.

    Smothers will teach you the ins and outs of bourbon (she has more than 100 in stock), show you how to make a proper mint julep, and take you through her collection of small-production wines.

    "I wanted to create a cocktail haven for the home and professional bartender and a store featuring small family wineries," Smothers says. "But I also wanted to be in a neighborhood with a sense of community, where I could afford to own a home and have a business and get to know my customers."

    A subway and bus ride away in Red Hook, she's found it all.

  4. #34

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    http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/i...9_18nets3.html
    Water Taxi heads to Fairway
    By Ariella Cohen
    The Brooklyn Papers

    Who needs the highway to get to Fairway?

    A new weekend ferry service to bring Manhattanites to the new market — and perhaps to sample Red Hook’s other attractions — began last weekend.

    “I had no idea about this place, it’s really beautiful,” said ferry rider John Bedan.

    The newly renovated New York Water Taxi terminal sits at the foot of Van Brunt Street — facing the soon-to-open gourmet emporium.

    Passengers will be able to stop in Red Hook, or hop a ride to Brooklyn’s Fulton Ferry Landing, or to Lower Manhattan, 17 times each Saturday and Sunday — a tourist-friendly schedule created with an eye towards the market, as well as the city’s plans to connect the notoriously hard-to-reach waterfront neighborhood to future parks in Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights and Governor’s Island.

    A receipt from Fairway — expected to open on May 17 — will earn ferry passengers a $3 discount. Operators are hoping it’s enough of a deal to lure Manhattan’s Fresh Direct shoppers to the converted Civil-War era warehouse store.

    “My brother is always saying what a pain it is to get to Red Hook, but when he got off the ferry he was like, ‘That was easy,’” crowed Red Hook resident Katie Dixon. “It was 15 minutes door-to-door from his apartment in the financial district to Red Hook.”

    Not only residents and tourists are impressed. Last month, the federal Small Business Administration awarded the Fairway site’s developer, Greg O’Connell, its “Small Business of the Year” award, citing his role in “turning Red Hook into New York’s hottest new neighborhood.”

    The opening coincided with the second docking of the Queen Mary 2 at its pier at the foot of Pioneer Street. Some passengers were a little too enthusiastic.

    “We got e-mails from cruise ship passengers who wanted to catch the ferry in Manhattan and take it to the dock at Red Hook,” said NY Water Taxi president Tom Fox. “But the walk is too long with baggage.”

    This week, Ikea unveiled its plans for transporting shoppers to its big-box store on the waterfront — slated to open in the summer of 2008. In response to concerns about the traffic impact of its gigantic blue-and-yellow store, the Swedish furniture retailer said it will shuttle shoppers to the distant F and G train station at Smith and Ninth Street, and provide a non-stop ferry from their site to lower Manhattan.

    Ikea’s ferry will be free — with the right shopping bag, of course.

  5. #35
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward
    This week, Ikea unveiled its plans for transporting shoppers to its big-box store on the waterfront — slated to open in the summer of 2008 ... the Swedish furniture retailer said it will shuttle shoppers to the distant F and G train station at Smith and Ninth Street, and provide a non-stop ferry from their site to lower Manhattan.

    Ikea’s ferry will be free — with the right shopping bag, of course.
    Water taxi's are great idea -- although the return trip might make for some interesting crowding on board.

  6. #36
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    Basicly, all of Red Hook is a disgusting and run down place. Not safe there at day, not safe there at night.

  7. #37
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atraene
    Basicly, all of Red Hook is a disgusting and run down place. Not safe there at day, not safe there at night.
    Tell us what you really think.

  8. #38
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    Red Hook is a sucky bad neighbrohood. People not from the area i expect to say 'oooh its a nice place, its not bad'. Forget that, if your not from the area dont speak of it. I lived on Columbia Street, seen how it changed. Nothing but roving gangs and has a high drug crime rate.

    To everyone:

    Red Hook is a BAD neighborhood. That, and South Brooklyn. It's run down, the water is absolutly disgusting and polluted.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by atraene
    I lived on Columbia Street...
    How long ago?

    Quote Originally Posted by atraene
    ...seen how it changed.
    For better or worse?

    Quote Originally Posted by atraene
    Nothing but roving gangs and has a high drug crime rate.
    Nothing but?

  10. #40
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    -about 7 months ago, recently moved to Astoria, Queens.

    -worse.

    -more then half.

  11. #41
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Here is a family who seem to enjoy living in Red Hook...


    An Unlikely Paradise, Right Around the Corner



    Elizabeth and Mark Ehrhardt and
    their children, Charlotte, 8, and
    Jasper, 5. Through a lucky break,
    they got to buy a house in Red
    Hook. "There's a lot of kismet in
    our lives," Mr. Ehrhardt said.



    By STEPHEN P. WILLIAMS
    Published: May 14, 2006

    MARK AND ELIZABETH EHRHARDT and their two children see bright stars in the night sky when they look out their windows deep in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

    "When was the last time you did that in this city?" Mrs. Ehrhardt said on a recent morning, standing in her loftlike living room, her strawberry blond hair bubbling off her head. "Everywhere else, there's too much light. It amazed me when I first saw the stars."

    Inhaling smoke from a Camel, Mr. Ehrhardt said: "There's a lot of kismet in our lives. We have plans and ambitions like anyone else, but so many of the good things that happen to us are by happenstance and coincidence."

    For instance, there's the immaculately renovated, plain-Jane town house the family lives in with their dog, Cricket. It's just off Van Brunt Street, a few blocks up from a soon-to-open Fairway supermarket that's causing residents to bemoan the expected traffic at the same time they look forward to being able to buy organic vegetables and aged balsamic vinegar, items not traditionally associated with Red Hook.

    This is the Ehrhardts' third year on the waterfront, and their Volkswagen Passat has the mileage to prove it, since this part of Brooklyn is a 30-minute walk to the nearest subway. Late last summer, the Ehrhardts were living in a rental around the corner, but they wanted more space.

    Most mornings Mr. Ehrhardt, 39, would head to Movers Not Shakers, his moving company on Columbia Street. Mrs. Ehrhardt, 36, would then carve out time from taking care of Jasper, 5, and Charlotte, 8, to surf propertyshark.com and other Web sites for housing bargains. She didn't find any.

    Often, when the couple were out taking Cricket for a walk, they would pass a certain dilapidated two-story town house nearby.

    "We thought it was a cute little thing," said Mrs. Ehrhardt, who favors teal biker boots and outlandish coats, including a fake white fur that wouldn't look out of place on a Palm Beach doyenne visiting New York for the winter holidays.

    One day the couple noticed that a construction crew was gutting the house, and they assumed they had missed out on buying it.

    Then by chance, Scott Baker, a neighbor who keeps up with what's happening in the community, walked into LeNell's, the eccentric Red Hook liquor store that's known for stocking more varieties of bourbon than a Kentucky colonel ever heard of. He asked Tonya LeNell Smothers, the proprietor, if she knew anyone who deserved a good deal on a good house. She recommended the Ehrhardts, perhaps in part because Mr. Ehrhardt had recently given her a good price on moving a big piece of furniture.

    It turned out the little house that Mrs. Ehrhardt thought was so cute was being renovated by the Crown Heights Jewish Community Council as a public service. The Ehrhardts applied for the privilege of buying it at cost: the $90,000 purchase price and more than $400,000 in renovations.

    They learned last November that the house was theirs. It's not a fancy "brownstone Brooklyn original crown moldings" sort of place.

    It has a stubby concrete stoop, and polyurethaned Home Depot style doors and kitchen cabinets that might look at home in a suburban apartment complex. The windows are small. The backyard is paved and lifeless except for some raised planting beds that Mr. Ehrhardt recently built from lumber salvaged from a house down the block.

    But it is a private house that has been renovated from top to bottom. It has two stories with a large master suite, a bedroom for each child and a finished basement that will be the perfect place for teenage angst.

    What's more, the parents feel a sense of community in the neighborhood, and the children, who go to elementary school in nearby Cobble Hill, can walk down to the beach and have seaweed fights with clear views of the Statue of Liberty, Governors Island and Lower Manhattan. On a recent day a neighbor brought kayaks to the beach and let all the children paddle around.

    The house is an unlikely paradise for the Ehrhardts, who a few years ago hardly knew that Red Hook existed. They had both lived in Manhattan for years when, in the summer of 2001, they made plans to trade their cramped one-bedroom rental in Hell's Kitchen for a two-bedroom rental in a grand old brick and wrought-iron building in Cobble Hill.

    Mr. Ehrhardt, who plays drums in a rock band called the Saloonatics NYC, feared that he would ache for the street life, excitement and crowds of Manhattan if the family moved across the river. But Mrs. Ehrhardt was weary of struggling around Manhattan with strollers and toddlers. She prevailed.

    Then came Sept. 11. To safeguard a subway power station, the police closed the Ehrhardts' block of West 53rd Street, and this delayed their move until October. When they finally got to Brooklyn, their apartment near the East River looked out on plumes of smoke rather than the Twin Towers.

    "Still, Brooklyn felt leafy and safe," Mrs. Ehrhardt said.

    Her husband added, "It took me just 48 hours to open up to the trees, the space and the light the sky was so big it was like being in Montana."

    In the new apartment, their younger child staged a sleep strike when they tried to wean him. To lull him, Mr. Ehrhardt would pile him into the car and meander around. One night he ended up in a desolate neighborhood of low-rise houses and vast Civil War-era warehouses that seemed to border an endless expanse of water.

    "It felt undiscovered," Mr. Ehrhardt said. He later realized that he was in Red Hook, and after exploring a bit more, he and his wife were so taken with it that they decided to relocate.

    In 2004, Mrs. Ehrhardt, who has what she considers a healthy passion for real estate, found a most peculiar house. She describes it as a "shrunken raised ranch house" of the sort you can find in many suburbs. But it had been crammed into the backyard of a 19th-century tenement on Van Brunt Street.

    Although the yard was concrete, not grass, and it had a view of a wall, the Ehrhardts thought it was a nice $1,800-a-month, 1,200-square-foot home.

    When the landlords put the whole parcel on the market, the Ehrhardts realized their days were numbered.

    Not long after that, they were the new owners of a well-priced house that they hadn't even known was for sale. And they're happy. "Red Hook is less planned than other neighborhoods," Mrs. Ehrhardt said. "Things don't always fit together perfectly here, which is comforting to me."

    The Ehrhardts believe that they are living through a special time in Red Hook, with a lot of opposing forces, including cruise ship operators, Ikea and local families who like the status quo all battling to determine the future of the neighborhood. But they aren't too worried.

    "It's still got a working-class mentality around here that I like, with glassblowers, carpenters and artists," Mrs. Ehrhardt said. "It's a place where you can be yourself."



    Mark and Elizabeth Ehrhardt's
    newly renovated house is not
    a fancy "brownstone Brooklyn
    original crown moldings" sort
    of place, but they were able
    to buy it at cost, for around
    $500,000.



    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  12. #42
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Damn. Red Hook roving gangs are getting younger and younger.

  13. #43

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    That's a relief. I have a close relation moving into Red Hook this very day.

    We all know how trustworthy assurances of a place's safety have been at times past on this forum. This assurance seems genuine and plausible.

  14. #44
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    That family oviously loves to live in a slum.











  15. #45

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    Although it is far from the point when decline began (I lived nearby then), it has not gotten much worse in the short time you lived there.

    It needs a lot of help, but conditions have improved over the recent past. It is on the way up, not down.

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