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Thread: Second Avenue Subway Project

  1. #211
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    FEDS FINALLY ABOARD 2ND AVENUE $UBWAY


    By GEOFF EARLE Post Correspondent

    April 17, 2006 -- WASHINGTON - The feds have green-lighted the long-awaited Second Avenue subway, The Post has learned.
    The Federal Transit Administration plans to announce today that the massive project's first $5 billion section "meets the criteria" for going into "final development" - Washingtonspeak for approval of the initiative.

    With this new OK, design and engineering contractors can start spending the $1.3 billion in federal funds set aside for the first phase of a transit line that eventually will run from East Harlem to the Financial District.

    "The wheels are turning on the Second Avenue subway project, that's for sure," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, who represents the East Side. "This is another sign of the progress we're making."



    The next step: breaking ground. The hope is that the first leg, from 63rd to 96th streets, will be ready for use by 2012.

    While supporters see the new approval as the light at the end of a long tunnel, New York's congressional delegation will have to fight each year to ensure that the funding is provided. The state is kicking in $450 million, and the Metropolitan Transit Authority $3 billion.

    The FTA told Congress this month that it planned to issue the go-ahead after a 10-day notice. A document revealing the decision was obtained by The Post.

    The project is aimed at relieving overcrowding on the No. 4, 5, and 6 trains, which all run along Lexington Avenue - the East Side's only subway line.

    The feds estimate that the first phase will take six to 12 years to complete. They also predict that, when completed in 2030, the new line will save riders a collective 62,300 hours per weekday by cutting their walk and transfer times.

    In 2012, the feds say, the MTA will be able to extend the uptown Q train from its current terminus at 57th Street and Seventh Avenue to Second Avenue stations at 72nd, 86th and 96th Street. At first, riders will be able to head downtown by switching to the Lexington line at 63rd or taking the new line to lower Manhattan along Broadway.

    Eventually, the line will run 81/2 miles through its own tunnel down the East Side, from 125th Street to Hanover Square. The feds estimate the full project to cost in excess of $13 billion.

    The idea of a Second Avenue subway is hardly new - it was first proposed in 1929.

    geoff.earle@nypost.com

  2. #212

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    Gothamist celebrates with a spoof:


  3. #213

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    Quote Originally Posted by GEOFF EARLE
    The project is aimed at relieving overcrowding on the No. 4, 5, and 6 trains, which all run along Lexington Avenue - the East Side's only subway line.

    The feds estimate that the first phase will take six to 12 years to complete. They also predict that, when completed in 2030, the new line will save riders a collective 62,300 hours per weekday by cutting their walk and transfer times.
    Maybe i'm going out on a limb here, but wouldn't 25 years be enough time for real-estate developers to, at least in part, catch up with the increase in transit capacity?

  4. #214

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    24 years for 8.5miles? Thats what - 1.5m progress each day (and every day)!

  5. #215

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick-taylor
    24 years for 8.5miles? Thats what - 1.5m progress each day (and every day)!
    And not only that, but some of the tunnel already exists!

    And furthermore, it's bound to straggle home several years late.

    And if the past is any indication, it'll be abandoned unfinished.



    50-50 that anyone on this board will get to ride it in his or her lifetime; we don't build them at the pace of London.

    But our taxes are lower, for what it's worth.

  6. #216

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc
    50-50 that anyone on this board will get to ride it in his or her lifetime; we don't build them at the pace of London.

    But our taxes are lower, for what it's worth.
    Ablarc Shhhh... Nick's here. I've heard enough about the Queen already today.

  7. #217
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    M.T.A. officials are now planning to begin building the Second Ave. line within the next year and plan to open new stops at 96th, 86th, and 72nd Sts. and connect the new trains to the existing Q train by 2012.

    First 2nd Ave.stops would connect with Downtown

    By Josh Rogers


    If the seventh decade proves to be the charm and fruitful work on the Second Ave. actually begins soon, Downtowners will get new service in the first phase of the project and will not have to wait yet another decade or two before they see any benefits.


    The Metropolitan Transportation Authority cleared a hurdle in Washington D.C. this week and hopes to resume the long-delayed project by the end of this year or early next year. The M.T.A. gave up the idea of building a scaled down version of the line just on the Upper East Side some time ago, but after that decision was changed, officials continued to say those stops would be built first and were relatively quiet about the Downtown component of the first phase.


    The M.T.A. hopes to finish the first phase in 2012 and it will allow Upper East Side commuters (at 96th, 86th or 72nd Sts.) to get on an expanded Q-line which will follow the current Q route down to Canal St. and on to Brooklyn. The trip to Lower Manhattan is likely to be faster on the Q’s Broadway line than the full Second Ave. line – the T – because commuters will be able to get to Canal St. in six stops from E. 72nd St. on the Q route and seven or eight stops on the T train depending on whether riders get off at Grand and Chrystie Sts. or Chatham Square – the stations closest to Canal.


    U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney, one of the strongest backers of the line, said about 200,000 riders are expected to use the Q-Second Ave. line the first day it opens, perhaps in six years. One of them may be Amelie Thurston, 27, a straphanger who was waiting for a Brooklyn-bound Q on Canal Tuesday. (She’ll be counted twice that day in 2012 if she takes a roundtrip.)


    Thurston said she has heard a little about the Second Ave. line but has not followed developments closely since it seemed a long way off. She did not know it would connect with the Q, but said she thought she would ride this new line most days.


    “I have heard about it, but I haven’t researched it or anything,” she said. “It’ll be done when it’s done.”


    The Second Ave. el was torn down in 1942 and East Siders are now halfway through their seventh decade of waiting for a new train line. Bill Wheeler, the M.T.A.’s director of planning, said he understands the skepticism, but this time the agency will have the $3.8 billion to build the first phase, and by linking to Downtown in the beginning, it means a viable line can open before the 15-year project is done.


    “You get benefits right away,” Wheeler said in a telephone interview. He said Washington was reluctant to pay for a plan that would take so long to pay off. The Partnership for New York City, a group of business leaders, released a report 21/2 years ago saying the Second Ave. project should be a lower priority in part because the M.T.A. was not planning to open it in phases at that time.


    The project’s intent is to relieve the severe overcrowding on the Lexington line on the Upper East Side and provide service to people living and working in neighborhoods near the East River including parts of Chinatown, the Lower East Side and the Financial District.


    Wheeler, Maloney and other Second Ave. advocates were happy this week because the federal government moved the project into the final design stage. The M.T.A. is expected to invest $2.5 billion, and Washington $1.3 billion to cover the first phase of the project.


    “Final design means you can get the design ready for real bids,” Wheeler said of the federal decision. “It means they’re as serious as we are about the job.”


    Maloney said the subway project battle has spanned her entire 14-year career in Congress and has been her toughest. “Given the starts and stops, starts and stops they want to make sure we’re going to do it,” she said. Maloney thinks they never would have gotten this far if not for the work of Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who once held up the state budget until the M.T.A. committed to the full build line.


    “Shelly and I are not going to stop,” Maloney said, in explaining why she thinks the line will be built soon. She said the pair has joined with Manhattan borough president Scott Stringer to form a task force to make sure the M.T.A. does not shift the project’s money to other places.


    In the 1970s, the M.T.A. started building Second Ave. tunnels, but construction stopped because of the city’s fiscal crisis. Wheeler said there was no plan to open the project in phases then, so canceling was not a difficult decision because it was such a long-term, expensive project.


    Wheeler said the Q express tunnel has enough tunnel capacity to accommodate the extra trains that may start coming from the Upper East Side starting in 2012. He said the tunnel connecting Canal St. to the four R,W local stops in the Financial District is pretty busy and probably couldn’t accommodate too many Q trains, but if ridership demand increases at those stops in the next few years, the M.T.A. could consider extending the Q to Downtown stops south of Canal St. in the first phase.


    The second phase is likely to connect the line between 125th and 96th Sts. and will have a Metro-North transfer, Wheeler said. The third phase will run from 72nd St. to Houston St. and the last one from Houston St. to Hanover Square, with stops in between at Grand St., Chatham Square and the Seaport. If a planned rail link connecting Lower Manhattan with J.F.K. Airport and the Long Island Rail Road is built, it will also allow for the Second Ave. T to be extended into Brooklyn through the link’s new tunnel.


    Speaker Silver, whose district includes Chinatown and the Lower East Side, has always been concerned that the M.T.A. would never build the Downtown portion if the money ran out. In an interview with Downtown Express two years ago, he said he was even willing to block the entire project unless the M.T.A. agreed to do construction work Downtown in the first phase.


    A Silver spokesperson said Wednesday that the speaker is willing to accept Washington’s insistence on phasing the project, so long as the entire line gets built.


    “The Q-line is an interim step to qualify for federal funding,” said the spokesperson, Jim Quent. “The speaker remains committed to the full build of the Second Ave. subway.”


    Maloney, whose eastern district includes some of the Lower East Side, said many New Yorkers will reap the benefits of the new line including Maloney herself, particularly when she meets Downtown constituents on winery nights in meetings far away from subway stops.


    “Before you and I die,” she said, “let’s get this complete.”

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_154/first2ndave.html
    Last edited by TonyO; April 24th, 2006 at 07:52 PM.

  8. #218

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    Am i correct in understanding that this line will end at 105th street?

  9. #219
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    ^ No, looks like it'll go beyond that.


  10. #220

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    brilliant. that was going to be my suggestion to have it end at 125 st. boy my commute to work will be so much quicker. that is if i still have the same job 2050. oh and if im still alive. i'd be 70

  11. #221
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    Any news about the Second Avenue Subway project? Does anyone know when they are going to start digging the tunnels and putting up subway stations along 2nd Avenue?

  12. #222

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSpice
    Any news about the Second Avenue Subway project? Does anyone know when they are going to start digging the tunnels and putting up subway stations along 2nd Avenue?
    Not anytime soon Atleast not untill 2008, if they open any part of it by 2012 I'll eat my tie.

  13. #223

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugenious
    Not anytime soon Atleast not untill 2008, if they open any part of it by 2012 I'll eat my tie.
    2007 is the start date.

  14. #224
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    The reason I am asking is because I heard that this fall they will start the work and the Rainbow store on the corner of 94th Street and 2nd Avenue will soon close to make way for one of the entrances. I think the 2008 guess is certainly wrong. It's definitely happening earlier because I live in the Yorkville area and there have been several cumminity board and MTA meeting devoted to pending changes and expected dalays and problems.

  15. #225
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    From http://cityrealty.com/new_developments:

    Upper East Side board looks at Second Avenue Subway plans 12-JUL-06

    Last night the Second Avenue Subway Task Force of Community Board 8, which represents the Upper East Side in Manhattan, hosted a presentation by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of its proposed construction of a Second Avenue subway.

    The long-delayed project is designed to alleviate overcrowding on the Lexington Avenue Subway and make subways more accessible to the far east areas of the Upper East Side. The new line will run from 125th Street to Hanover Square in Lower Manhattan with construction in four phases.

    Last night’s meeting focused on the first phase, which is to include new stations from 96th connecting to the existing station at 63rd and Lexington and will also involve cutting into Second Avenue between 95th and 91st streets to insert the tunnel burrowing machine (TBM) needed to create the subway line. The Design Manager for the project described the machine as being “like a giant earthworm, and said that it is 22 feet in diameter.

    Some members of the community felt that this area was taking a “major beating” in the proposed plan as the above-ground work is expected to impact residents and businesses for 18 months during construction. The MTA representatives responded that the area was picked as the site for the initial excavation because the soil in the area was ideal compared to others in the “geographical profile” of the proposed route.

    The MTA representatives said that sidewalks may be reduced to a width as narrow as 7 feet so that automobile traffic can still be accommodated on the avenue. During the above-ground construction phase, building awnings and canopies, public telephones, fruit stands and sidewalk cafes that lie within the construction zone will have to be removed.
    In addition, MTA plans to close some side streets in order to create temporary “delivery loading zones” for businesses during rush hour and then keep those streets open during subsequent hours of the day.

    According to Chapter 12 of the submitted Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), noise from the construction will be monitored and controlled by means of noise dampening equipment, and the noise is not allowed to exceed five decibels above the “ambient noise level.”

    In 1995, the MTA began a Manhattan East Side Alternatives (MESA) Study and the MTA Board allocated $1.05 billion in its 2000-2004 Capital Program to complete the planning design and initiate construction and in April, 2004 a final environmental impact statement (FEIS) was published for the project and the very lengthy document can be viewed at http://www.mta.nyc.us/capconstr/sas/index.html under the “Documents & Presentations” section.

    Numerous area residents at the meeting at the New York Blood Center maintained that the FEIS needs to be updated because of significant recent real estate activity in the vicinity of the project and many others expressed concerns about compensation for lost business revenues, noise, pest control and building safety.

    Community Board 8 will hold another meeting about the huge project in the fall.

    Under a best case scenario, the new subway line is expected to be completed about 2014.


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