Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910
Results 136 to 145 of 145

Thread: Bryant Park

  1. #136
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Will these "parks" be mobile?

    Although that would be frustrating to "regular" motorists, I think it would be interesting to have a park appear outside your office one day...

  2. #137

    Default

    41st is a disaster, and it has nothing to do with a lack of green space. This block, along with many others in west midtown, is basically a 24/7 truckstop. Its usually end to end with delivery trucks. There should be laws stating that truck deliveries in manhattan can only be at night, when the streets are empty.

    I'd be all for these new planters and mini-parks if it keeps the trucks away.

  3. #138

    Default

    This is really nice and should be replicated elsewhere.

  4. #139
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,126

    Default


  5. #140
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Do they now show the movies on the east end of Bryant Park?

    I used to enjoy going there for Monday Night Movies, but now there's just way too many people.

  6. #141
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Jersey City
    Posts
    4,444

    Default

    That was for the Rangers game last night.

  7. #142
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    To watch them lose!

  8. #143
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Granite remains of the 1842 Croton reservoir

    It’s always a treat to see bits of New York’s past hidden within the contemporary city.

    Case in point: sections of a granite wall once part of the four-acre receiving reservoir at 40th Street and Fifth Avenue, filled in 1842 and lasting through the Gilded Age.

    These walls are visible along a staircase in the south wing of the main branch of the New York Public Library, which took the reservoir’s place on that stretch of Fifth Avenue and opened in 1911.



    Imagine what the city was like in the 1840s, when the Croton Aqueduct was completed, and the growing metropolis finally had a ready supply of fresh upstate water.

    “Chosen for its location at the highest point of Murray Hill to increase water pressure to densely populated downtown districts, the reservoir was an odd symbol of urban accomplishment,” wrote David Soll in Empire of Water.

    “When completed in 1841, it had few neighbors and towered over the handful of scattered structures in the surrounding area.

    Across Fifth Avenue lay ‘an open field, upon which stood a single country house.'”

    By the 1860s, New York’s elite promenaded on the reservoir’s walkway, and Fifth Avenue became prime real estate.

    In 20 years, calls for the reservoir’s destruction appeared and grew louder; it was obsolete, critics charged, and its Egyptian revival architectural style an eyesore, even after the city planted ivy to cover the Fifth Avenue side.

    By 1898, the wrecking ball came. The granite walls in the library are all that remain.

    [Third image: the reservoir in 1850; fourth image: in the 1880s; NYPL Digital Collection]

    https://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.c...ury-reservoir/

  9. #144
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    This Massive Reservoir Used To Be In Midtown


    by Jen Carlson




























    All courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York

    The Croton Reservoir was a massive above-ground reservoir that held 20 million gallons of water from the Croton River—it boasted walls 50-feet tall and 25-feet wide, and stood where the New York Public Library stands today. To build it, the adjacent plot (now Bryant Park) also needed to be cleared, which meant exhuming thousands of bodies and transporting them to Wards Island, as the land there was a potter's field at the time.

    The project was completed in 1842—a moment historian Henry Collins Brown called "the greatest forward stride in the city's history, [with] the general introduction of running water"—but was eventually torn down to make way for the library in 1900. By 1902, the cornerstone was laid for the library's main branch, which still holds part of the reservoir's remnants today.


    (via Wikipedia)

    The NYPL's Angela Montefinise told us this morning that anyone can see these remains—"you can still see it on the lower level of South Court in the Schwarzman Building (near the auditorium). It's not closed off. If you walk into South Court on the first floor and look down, you can see it (if you don't want to go all the way downstairs)." There's also a plaque located in the subway system—on a wall in the passageway that connects the 5th Avenue station and 42nd Street station.

    Click through for a look at what the reservoir looked like when it was still standing—in an 1844 edition of the Columbia Spy, Edgar Allen Poe wrote, “When you visit Gotham, you should ride out Fifth Avenue, as far as the distributing reservoir, near Forty-third Street, I believe. The prospect from the walk around the reservoir is particularly beautiful. You can see, from this elevation, the north reservoir at Yorkville; the whole city to the Battery; and a large portion of the harbor, and long reaches of the Hudson and East Rivers."

    That elevation Poe referred to was from the promenade, which hosted groups of gatherers on a daily basis, making for a "delightful scene at night, with the moonlight dancing on the water."

    http://gothamist.com/2015/01/16/revi...r.php#photo-14

  10. #145
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Difficult to imagine it looking like that now. 1970s New York City... .


    Bryant Park Was Once Nicknamed Needle Park

    By Michelle Young
    06/23/2015




    Bryant Park in the 1970s


    The arrival of the elevated train on Sixth Avenue in 1878 spelled the beginning of a long decline for Bryant Park, as a shadow was cast on the park making it less desirable. Robert Moses attempted to revitalize the park in the 1930s via a redesign that included adding hedges and an iron fence, which had the inadvertent effect of making it a haven for illicit activity.

    By the 1970s, drug dealing, prostitution and homelessness were the defining characteristics of Bryant Park, which was nicknamed “Needle Park.” As the Bryant Park Corporation writes today, “By 1979, New York seemed to have given up Bryant Park for lost as an urban amenity, as well as an historic site.” But new programming in the park began in the late 1970s, the Bryant Park Restoration Corporation was created in 1980, and a redesign of the park was completed by 1992.

    http://untappedcities.com/2015/06/23...bryant-park/9/

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910

Similar Threads

  1. The Bank of America Tower a.k.a. One Bryant Park - by Cook + Fox Architects
    By NYguy in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 3813
    Last Post: December 4th, 2014, 10:04 PM
  2. Liberty Park Renovated and Renamed Zuccotti Park
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: September 26th, 2011, 01:15 PM
  3. American Radiator Building - Bryant Park Hotel - 40 W. 40th St - by Hood & Howells
    By ddny in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: November 12th, 2010, 01:54 PM
  4. Marriott Residence Inn - Bryant Park Tower - 1033 Sixth Ave - by Nobutaka Ashihara
    By kliq6 in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 119
    Last Post: January 7th, 2007, 07:59 AM
  5. The Bryant Park
    By Comelade in forum Photos and Videos of New York
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: July 31st, 2006, 08:36 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software