Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Bronx Whitestone Bridge

  1. #16
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    926

    Default A Parallel Whitestone? Or Throgs Neck?

    While I would love to see a parallel Whitestone Bridge put up, I can understand how the residents south of the current span would feel about losing their homes. To handle the traffic, perhaps a parallel Throgs Neck Bridge, with full interchange at the south of the bridges over the water, would be worthwhile.

    No matter how you slice it, another bridge is needed to handle volume, and these things are cash cows that pay for themselves.

  2. #17

    Default

    The way really long bridges and tunnels are being built in Europe and the Far East, we would have built a bridge across Long Island sound by now.

    In infrastructure construction, as in social policy, political prestige and practically everything else in which we were once pre-eminent, except for popular culture: we look like we're losing our cutting edge as the world's leader.

  3. #18

    Default

    Last updated: December 1, 2008 04:19pm

    MTA Awards $193M Contract for Bronx Bridge

    By Paul Bubny


    Bronx-Whitestone Bridge

    NEW YORK CITY-The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Monday awarded a $192.8-million contract for reconstruction on the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge connecting the Bronx to Queens and Long Island. The contractor--Conti of New York, LLC--is scheduled to start work on the four-year, three-stage project by year’s end, according to a release from MTA Bridges and Tunnels.

    Over the course of the project, the entire 1,785-foot long elevated Bronx approach to the bridge will be replaced from the ground up with a completely new structure, including foundations and 15 double-arch concrete piers to support a widened roadway constructed of steel girders and concrete deck, according to the release. The new structure will be wider to provide lanes and shoulders that meet present-day width standards, although the number of travel lanes on the Bronx approach will remain the same: three in each direction.

    The initial stage of the Bronx approach project involves constructing the new piers and foundations, and removing the median barrier. That work will last approximately a year-and-a-half, beginning by year’s end, according to the release.

    The second major stage of the project will entail demolition of the existing roadway, lane by lane, and constructing the new roadway superstructure over the course of two-and-a-half years. The third major stage, which is expected to be completed over the final four months of the project, will involve demolishing the existing piers and final site improvements such as landscaping and draining upgrades.

    The 2,300-foot long, 74-foot wide suspension span, which will mark its 70th anniversary next year, has been the subject of several projects in recent years to extend its life by reducing the load on the cables. "The approach roadway is reaching the end of its useful life, and this construction project is central to maintaining the integrity of the 69-year-old Bronx-Whitestone Bridge for many decades to come," says David Moretti, acting president of MTA Bridges & Tunnels, in a statement.

    As part of the $2.5-billion, self-funded 2008-2013 capital improvement program-- announced last March, MTA Bridges & Tunnels--has further projects in mind for the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, including similar renovation work on the Queens approach. The agency also has projects planned for the Throgs Neck, Robert F. Kennedy--formerly Triborough--Verrazano-Narrow, Henry Hudson, Cross Bay Veterans Memorial and Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial bridges, along with the Queens-Midtown and Brooklyn-Battery tunnels.
    Some of the projects will continue phases of work that began in the current 2005-2008 capital program period. The program is being financed by bonds backed by the agency’s toll revenue, according to MTA.

    http://www.globest.com/news/1298_129...sector=newyork

    Copyright 2008 ALM Properties, Inc.

  4. #19

    Default

    From the standpoint of proportion and detail, this is New York's most elegant bridge. After the rebuilding, will it still be that?

  5. #20
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    With all those double piers down below it might look a bit awkward.

    "End of it's useful life" : A term that should send chills down everyone's spine.

    So much of the massive infrastructure of the USA is 60 - 80 years old and is coming up on the expiration date.

    And we got no money to build 'em new and better. One solution: Open the borders to a million guys willing to get their hands dirty and earn a couple of bucks a day. We could become the new Dubai.

  6. #21
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,473

    Default

    What a fabulous photo:


  7. #22
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,473

    Default

    Less Bronx-Whitestone Bridge Yielded More Stability During Hurricane Sandy

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    David W. Dunlap/The New York Times
    The Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, seen from Malba, Queens.
    One very windy day in 1968, the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge began to oscillate crazily,
    leading drivers to abandon their cars in panic.


    But on an even windier night in 2012, as Hurricane Sandy howled across Long Island Sound and buffeted the span, the bridge stood all but unmoving. The difference? Six thousand fewer tons of steel trusses, which were removed in 2004.

    The trusses had been installed in 1946 to stiffen the bridge deck and lessen the chances that the 2,300-foot-long span would break apart in the wind, as the Tacoma Narrows Bridge (“Galloping Gertie“) did in 1940.

    But it turned out the trusses were doing more harm than good. Their weight was shortening the bridge’s life span by further stressing the structure. From an aesthetic point of view, they spoiled the slender lines of one of the most beautiful bridges in New York. And when those 70-mile-an-hour winds hit the bridge in November 1968, the deck oscillated all the same, as much as 10 inches.

    Instead of trusses, the bridge is now equipped with aerodynamic fiberglass fairings along the deck, which streamline the airflow around the suspended span. During Hurricane Sandy, the bridge was closed to traffic as it sustained winds of 50 to 55 miles an hour, and gusts up to 80 miles an hour. It reopened at noon the next day.

    “Our engineers were very pleased with the performance of the bridge,” said Aaron Donovan, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which owns and operates the Bronx-Whitestone through its bridges and tunnels division. “There were no instabilities recorded.”


    David W. Dunlap/The New York Times
    Detailed view of the aerodynamic fiberglass fairings that deflect wind load
    around the suspended deck of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge.


    Much credit for solving the problems of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge goes to Alan G. Davenport (1932-2009) and his colleagues at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory at Western University in London, Ontario. A new biography by Siobhan Roberts, “Wind Wizard: Alan G. Davenport and the Art of Wind Engineering” (Princeton University Press), details the work that has gone into preparing skyscrapers and bridges for an event like Hurricane Sandy.

    Ms. Roberts, 41, a freelance science writer, was in town during the storm. “I was definitely thinking of the Bronx-Whitestone, knowing that it was all rigged up to record every quiver.” she said. “I was doubtful that it had any instability, given what it’s gone through in the last 10 years.”

    The same was true for 601 Lexington Avenue, the 59-story skyscraper-on-stilts formerly known as Citicorp Center. In her book, Ms. Roberts revisits the harrowing summer of 1978 when Mr. Davenport and his colleagues helped determine that the tower was in danger of imminent collapse in certain winds. An emergency welding program, undertaken as hurricane season approached, left the tower “fit to withstand a 700-year storm,” Ms. Roberts wrote. (She suggested the base of the building as the rendezvous for our interview, to underscore her confidence.)


    Courtesy of Western University
    In the “Three Little Pigs” experiment, researchers at Western University blew this full-scale house
    apart with hurricane-strength pressure, to measure what structural systems failed and why.


    Mr. Davenport’s concern was not limited to long bridges and skyscrapers, Ms Roberts wrote. He worried about low-rise buildings, she said, in part because “the ability of a community to cope and recover turns on the survival of these Everyman structures.” In 2001, engineers at Western began the “Three Little Pigs” project. The goal was to subject a two-story, 1,900-square-foot, code-compliant brick house to hurricane-force pressures.

    Since then, two houses have been torn asunder to provide a better understanding of what structural systems fail under hurricane conditions, and why. One house had a gable roof: the classic, inverted V-shape in which two sloping planes rise from two parallel walls and meet along a center line. The other had a hip roof, in which four planes rise from all four walls, converging either at a point or along a center line. Many other tests have been conducted on roof sheathing, window openings, soffits and sidings, as well as on the form of the structures.

    “We don’t tend to think about the shape of the roof when we buy a house, except aesthetically,” said Prof. Gregory A. Kopp of Western University. “But hip roofs are definitely better than gable roofs.” Their structural and aerodynamic superiority, he said, is borne out in testing and in field observations after big tornadoes, when hip-roof houses remain intact while roofless houses nearby turn out to have been gabled. “Roof shape makes a big difference,” Professor Kopp said.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...y/#more-444208

  8. #23
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,770

    Default

    OK.... they TELL us that they did the experiment... but do not give us any word on what systems failed?

    TEASE!!!


    I'll huff and puff..... :P

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: March 10th, 2015, 05:10 AM
  2. Manhattan Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: April 28th, 2014, 08:35 AM
  3. Triborough Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: August 22nd, 2011, 10:35 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 26th, 2011, 04:09 AM
  5. The gantry of the float bridge of New York Central Railroad
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: March 21st, 2011, 04:16 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software