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Thread: The Gowanus Canal

  1. #121
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    Is it just me or does $500 million sound exceedingly cheap to fix a problem of this magnitude? How much is Newton Creek going to cost?

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    I think Newtown creek is going to be more expensive because of the giant underground oil plume that need to be removed somehow.

  3. #123
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    Sponge Park Is Actually Coming To The Gowanus Canal

    by Jessica Dailey



    It's been more than five years since the Sponge Park first came onto the Gowanus Canal scene, and now, finally, part of the park will actually be construction along the banks of the stinky waterway. The Daily News reports that enough money has been raised from city, state, and federal grants to build a small portion of the park where Second Street ends at the canal. To build the pollution-preventing green space, which was created by the Gowanus Canal Conservancy and dlandstudio, soil-filled concrete cells will be installed under the street to catch and filter stormwater before it runs into the canal. The park will be covered with plants that naturally absorb or breakdown toxins, heavy metals, and contaminants from sewage overflow, along with plants that soak up excess water like a sponge (get it?).











    The park will cost $1.5 million, and construction will begin in 2014. If all goes as planned (which is unlikely with anything related to/near the Gowanus Canal), the park should open in summer 2015.

    Gowanus Canal 'Sponge Park' moves ahead as Bloomberg administration allocates cash for Brooklyn greenspace [NYDN]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...anus_canal.php

  4. #124
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    OK, does anyone else get this particular abbreviation?

    "http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...anus_canal.php"

    I am sorry, that is too punny.

  5. #125
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    The go-on-us anal canal?

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    That would be beautiful, and they've already started flushing out the canal, or at least constructing the system which will flush it out. Imagine in ten years, that being the hot new spot for developers?

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    Industry Still Churns, Even as Cleanup Plan Proceeds for a Canal

    By KIA GREGORY


    Jabin Botsford/The New York Times
    Even as the federal government prepares to clean the Gowanus Canal, working industries
    continue to line the Brooklyn waterway.


    A History of Pollution in the Gowanus Canal

    The federal government is about to release its final, $500 million cleanup plan for the Gowanus Canal, one of New York City’s two Superfund sites, a long-awaited moment in the effort to cleanse more than a century of environmental abuse.

    But even on the eve of its purging, the Gowanus Canal remains very much a garbage dump for the city. Along the banks of the canal one recent morning, just a tin can’s toss from the oily green waters, a giant claw grabbed at a tower of scrap metal, like a crane in an arcade game. In the lot over, delivery trucks idled behind oil storage tanks. Near them, concrete mixers cranked, churned their ingredients and coughed up dust.

    “Somebody needs to heat homes and recycle metal and clean out garbage,” said Mike Petrosino, co-owner of a fifth-generation, family-owned business that operates Benson Metal, one of two scrap-metal yards that abut the canal and use it for loading and unloading barges. “The canal acts as an infrastructure that supports the city.”

    Loud, dirty industry has been entwined with the canal for generations, ever since barges delivered brownstone and coal to build Brooklyn’s row houses and light its parlor lamps.

    The bulk of the pollution was caused by long-closed factories and by decades of untreated sewage carried into the canal by city drains. But businesses currently along the canal have been fingered by the state or environmentalists for sometimes treating the canal like a waste dump. The environmental group Riverkeeper, which monitors local waterways, has in recent months filed lawsuits against Benson Metal, Greco Brothers Concrete, and Sixth Street Iron and Metal, accusing them of violating the Federal Water Pollution Control Act by allowing dirty storm water to run off their sites and into the canal without permits or controls.

    Joseph Greco Jr. of Greco Brothers Concrete declined to comment, and his lawyer did not return calls. Sixth Street Iron and Metal has since filed the necessary plans and permit requests, its vice president, Anthony De Conciliis, said.

    “We want to be here a long time,” Mr. De Conciliis said. “And we believe it’s extremely important that we do things that are environmentally sound.

    “In the ’50s, people would smoke in offices because they didn’t think secondhand smoke would harm anybody. We just got to adapt, adapt environmental conservancy into the business. We are a recycling facility at the end of the day.”

    In a settlement with the state last year, Benson agreed to pay $85,000 for more than 100 instances over 15 months of dropping metal into the water while loading barges. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently fined Petroleum Tank Cleaners on Butler Street, about a block from the canal, $32,500 for a spill and other violations, according to state records. The company did not respond to messages seeking comment.

    A bus company and other businesses owned by Jacob Marmurstein have been fined more than $500,000 for spilling oil, dumping debris into the canal and other violations, state environmental officials said.

    Just last month, the bulkhead at Benson collapsed, sending metal junk and concrete blocks into the water.

    Riverkeeper, which was out on the canal the day after the collapse, notified the Environmental Conservation Department, which along with the federal Environmental Protection Agency is working with Benson to stabilize the bank and build a new bulkhead.

    “It’s just another insult,” Phillip Musegaas, a program director at Riverkeeper, said of the collapse. “We’re talking about a company that is not managing its sites and is not concerned with preventing further environmental hazards.”

    The issue is also a strain for Mr. Petrosino.

    “A good portion of our day is not centered on dealing with the customer and building relationships, but talking about issues of compliance and regulations,” said Mr. Petrosino, 42, who began at the company when he was around age 8, riding in the truck next to his father. “It starts to distract you from your core business, which is handling materials.” Mr. Petrosino added, “It’s one of those obstacles that need to be addressed and handled, and we’re doing the best we can.”

    Much of the environmental injury is a vestige of the past, principally from three old manufacturing plants that turned coal into gas. Over time, the gooey byproduct seeped into the ground and into the shallow water. A thick mud of coal tar now oozes from the bottom and wells to the top, the sediment resembling sheets of shiny metal floating on the water.

    While the canal is no longer used as Brooklyn’s privy, during heavy rains discharges from the city’s antiquated sewer system still foul the water and give off a stench. There are also metals like mercury and lead, industrial chemicals and traces of pesticides. There are bikes and other sunken vessels. And there is dirty groundwater as well as storm water that picks up dirt and other pollutants from the remaining industries.

    Almost everything around the canal has changed in the last 20 years. Grit-loving young residents embrace the idea of paying $600,000 for one-bedroom apartments and dining not far from where untreated sewage once streamed past. Restaurants serving duck pastrami, smoked jowl cabbage and molasses-brined pork chops have sprouted, along with art studios and new neighborhood acronyms. The communities around it, not to mention developers, have latched onto the canal as a tangible link to the borough’s industrial past, while also pushing for its cleanup.

    In 2010, over the objections of city officials who proposed an alternative cleanup plan, fearing a federal label would scare away further development, the E.P.A. branded the canal a Superfund site, meaning the government would oversee the cleanup, and pursue polluters to handle the effort and foot the bill. (The city’s other Superfund site is the similarly fouled Newtown Creek.)
    The agency released its preliminary plan for the Gowanus Canal in 2012 and is expected to make it final by Monday. The estimated cost of half a billion dollars is to be spread among more than three dozen “potentially responsible parties.”

    They are mostly companies and a few government entities like the City of New York and the United States Navy, for ship work that polluted the canal. Many of the original businesses that once operated side by side along the canal have since merged, changed names or moved away, including Brooklyn Union Gas, which eventually rolled into National Grid; Continental Oil; and Standard Oil. When companies have been sold or merged, the successor company as well as the current property owner assume the liability. Companies that produced or transported the hazardous substances are also considered responsible.

    The cleanup, expected to begin in 2015, will focus on the toxic muck at the bottom, dredging the 10 feet of mud, mixing some of the remaining sediment with cement to prevent it from rising to the top, then capping it with materials like clay, gravel and sand to prevent erosion. The E.P.A. will also aim to reduce the sewer overflow from the city drains. After that, the view can turn to issues like the continuing dirty storm water runoff from existing businesses.

    “The mud dwarfs it all,” said Walter Mugdan, the regional Superfund director for the agency. “But once we clean the mud up, the remaining pollution becomes even a greater concern, because that’s what’s left.”

    The cleanup is expected to take 8 to 10 years. Maintenance will go on indefinitely. Still, the canal will never really be without taint, Mr. Mugdan said. The contamination in some places goes 100 feet deep. The waters will most likely never be apt for swimming, and who knows how long before the fish are good to eat.

    “But we can make a huge improvement over where it is now,” Mr. Mugdan said. Eventually, the water will clear, the ecosystem will revive and, he added, “the area will not stink to high heaven as it does now.”

    On a recent mild morning, the stench of garbage wafted over the canal. Trucks rumbled off the Gowanus Expressway, down the industrial business zone of Smith Street. Some with painted-on names like “The Monster” and “Mr. Rubbish” idled at the curb, while the giant crane moved metal scrap from one looming pile to another.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/27/ny...s&emc=rss&_r=0

  8. #128
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    Imagining A Cleaner Future For The Icky Gowanus Canal

    by Zoe Rosenberg


    Rendering of Atema's proposed Street Creeks via Atema Architecture

    Gowanus is drawing a lot of attention these days, for its current residential boom... as well as its $38 salted caramel pie and the newly opened shuffleboard bar. Of particular interest to Curbed, though, are the fanciful visions various architects and community members are putting forth regarding the the long, expensive cleanup of the totally polluted Gowanus Canal. According to the Times, the neighborhood hopes to remain "the kind of place where things sold on [craft and vintage retail website] Etsy are made," in opposition to a completely gentrified neighborhood like Dumbo (where, it so happens, Etsy maintains its corporate headquarters).


    Rendering of Sponge Park via dlandstudio]

    What sets Gowanus apart, columnist Ginia Bellafante emphasizes, is not only its residential and industrial presence but also locals' inherent interest in the surrounding somewhat-natural landscape. Last month, in light of the Superfund site remediation, the neighborhood played host to a TEDx conference during which architect Ate Atema and landscape architect Susannah Drake of dlandstudio presented conceptual designs for enhancing the functionality of the canal in handling its water and sewage overflow.


    Rendering of Atema's proposed Street Creeks via Atema Architecture

    Atema's plan, Street Creeks, proposes an intricate and expansive network of curbside channels, cisterns, and vegetation that would help filter and divert water before it runs off into the canal. Not dissimilarly, Drake's Sponge Park consists of soil-filled concrete cells, which would be installed under the street to catch and filter stormwater before it, too, pours into the beleaguered canal.


    [A look at the curbside channels of Street Creeks via Atema Architecture


    A rendering of the intricacies of Street Creeks and how it works to filter runoff. Via Atema Architecture


    An aerial look at the proposed Street Creeks project via Atema Architecture

    Both plans emphasize the neighborhood's ecological development and not just its building boom, highlighted most strongly when gentrification beacon Whole Foods planted its roots at Third Street and Third Avenue late last year. "People are coming in and paying a million dollars for a house between two factories and complaining," a neighborhood business owner tells the Times.

    The same neighbor remarked on the difference between the neighborhood's older industrial roots and new homeowners or tenants: "We need the city to send the message that if you're living next to a factory, you have to deal with it. We're not the factories of yesteryear who polluted the canal." Here's hoping Atema or Drake will be able to make the canal a more palatable place.

    The Once and Future Gowanus [NYT]
    Street Creeks [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...anus_canal.php

  9. #129
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    Visiting the Gowanus Canal's Under-Transformation 'Wild West'

    by Nathan Kensinger


    [The polluted banks of the Gowanus Canal are now being transformed by demolition and construction, despite the canal's Superfund designation. All photos by Nathan Kensinger.]

    Spring is returning to New York City, and with it comes the renewed sound of jackhammers and backhoes as construction sites return to life. Along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, warmer weather has brought a rapid wave of demolition, which is transforming the landscape. Warehouses are quickly being torn down, while neighborhood landmarks are being destroyed or renovated. The Coignet Stone Building is swathed in scaffolding, the Batcave is being cleaned out, and the silos next to the Carroll Street Bridge were completely demolished this week to make way for a 700-unit residential tower. "It's the wild west. It's really unbelievable," said Katia Kelly, who has lived in the area for 29 years. "It's a neighborhood under assault."

    Many of the old warehouses, silos and factories in this low-rise area were included in a proposed historic district that was up for a vote on March 13th. But after a 60-day delay, developers have been able to move forward with plans for a dense new residential community along the banks of the canal. "Gowanus was one of the last industrial neighborhoods that was still untouched, at least until the last five years," said Katia Kelly, who has documented the changing neighborhood on her blog Pardon Me For Asking. "The beauty of the Gowanus is that you have these older buildings."


    The first new residential tower on the canal will be built by the Lightstone Group, which began tearing down a second block of warehouses last week to make way for a 12-story project. Included in the demolition site were a pair of silos that had become a neighborhood fixture. Once home to the Issue Project Room, the BKLYN Yard, and Gowanus Grove, "the silo buildings were one of the iconic industrial ruins around Gowanus Canal, ranking up there with the Batcave and the Kentile sign," said Ariana Souzis, who was married at the silo site in 2011. "I will always remember the hushed quiet of the room and the curved walls as I fiddled with my pearls and hair." By Wednesday of this week, the silos had been turned into a pile of rubble.

    Unlike the Lightstone Group, the developers of the Batcave have committed to keeping their unique building intact. Also known as the BRT Powerhouse, the Batcave is currently being transformed into the Powerhouse Workshop by its owner, Joshua Rechnitz, with "an extensive program to clean-up the site and restore the structural integrity of the building," according to Maureen Connelly, the project's spokesperson. Tons of debris have been removed and a Brownfield remediation program will soon begin, in anticipation of the building's rebirth as an arts center.

    "For the sake of the structure I'm glad that someone's saving the building, instead of demolishing it like they're doing over at Domino Sugar," said Hannah Frishberg, an author working on a book about the Batcave. "There aren't very many spots like that left in New York. I really hope Rechnitz can turn it into something which actually benefits the community."

    As the pace of change on the Gowanus quickens, however, some locals have begun to question the wisdom of creating population density on the banks of a federal Superfund site plagued by sewage overflows, especially after Hurricane Sandy flooded the area in 2012. "We know what is going to happen in the next 20 years, 30 years. We should be pulling back from the water," said Katia Kelly. "The fact that it's a Superfund, the fact that it's in a flood zone—you have to look past the developers' wet dreams and ask: is this a good idea?"


    These low-rise warehouses at the end of First Street are currently being demolished to make way for a 12-story residential tower built by the Lightstone Group.


    One entire block of warehouses has already been torn down, to make way for 700 units of new housing at the water's edge. "These people are going to be in condos with raw sewage floating by," said Katia Kelly. "I think if you ask people, nobody thinks this is a good idea."


    Asbestos remediation is underway in the remaining warehouses, which were in Zone A during Hurricane Sandy. Neighbors are concerned that the new development, which will be raised 10 feet, may channel flood waters into their homes.


    Demolition of the old silos near Carroll Street began one week ago. "The fact that the Gowanus will be cleaner in my lifetime gives me some little amount of pride," Kelly said, looking out on the silos. "What isn't going to make me proud will be to walk by here in 20 years."


    Demolition crews stripped the building's balconies and interior apartments and studios. "I just tear them down," said one worker. "But what an amazing place to live. I would have lived there."


    By Tuesday, little remained of the iconic silos. By Wednesday, they had been completely leveled, erasing one of the Gowanus Canal's most iconic structures. "It makes me sick to my stomach when I walk by," said one neighbor. "Building on the banks of this—it's absurd."


    The Batcave, another iconic Gowanus structure, is currently being cleaned up by its owner. "The building has been swept clean," said Maureen Connelly, and "loose bricks and unstable roof elements have been removed."


    Workers are now busy repairing the roof. When the site is transformed into the Powerhouse Workshop, it "will include a waterfront esplanade along the Gowanus Canal that will be open to the public," according to Connelly.


    "Gowanus is changing," said Hannah Frishberg, "but I think it's buildings like the Batcave and Coignet Stone which will be the few that truly benefit, because these are structures that would just have reached an Admirals' Row level of ruin in a few years anyway."


    Across the street, the landscape has already been radically changed by Whole Foods, which replaced an industrial site with a long history.


    Whole Foods' new waterfront esplanade looks out over a sunken boat, a scrapyard, and another neighborhood landmark—the silos on 6th Street.


    Across from the esplanade, a rare view of one the last boats on the Gowanus has been opened up by the demolition of a bus depot.


    A new office building is being built next to the silos, to replace the bus depot. The construction site was left open to visitors. "Things are happening left and right that the city doesn't seem to be too concerned about," said Katia Kelly.


    In a matter of days, the wide open construction site was walled off by hastily laid cinderblocks. The construction site was partially flooded with Gowanus water.


    Nearby, the Public Place site is currently awaiting a cleanup plan in preparation for another huge development project. "If the EPA hadn't come along, you would have had 700 units of housing there now," said Kelly. "Remediation still has to happen here."


    The entire skyline of the Gowanus area, including Public Place, may be transformed in the next few years, as towers replace warehouses and Brownfields. "What is feasible in the Gowanus area, with flooding, rising sea levels?" asks Katia Kelly. "Someone has to go ahead and say it just doesn't make sense. It just doesn't make sense."

    Nathan Kensinger [Official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0..._wild_west.php

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    Gowanus Canal flushing tunnel is fully online after four-year rehab

    The $177 million renovation of the 1.2-mile-long tunnel allows it to push 252 million gallons — or about 30% more fresh water than it could before the upgrade — from Buttermilk Channel to the head of the highly toxic waterway each day, officials said. The tunnel was partially re-activated in December, but prior to that had been completely shut down for repairs since 2010.

    BY Natalie Musumeci


    DelMundo, Anthony freelance NYDN/Anthony DelMundo
    Officials say the reactivation of the Gowanus Canal flushing tunnel will improve the water quality of the highly toxic canal.

    Call it a royal flush.

    The city has fully re-activated the Gowanus Canal’s on-again, off-again flushing tunnel after a four-year, $177 million rehabilitation, officials announced Thursday.

    The renovation of the 1.2-mile-long tunnel allows it to push 252 million gallons — or about 30% more fresh water than it could before the upgrade — from Buttermilk Channel to the head of the highly toxic waterway each day, officials said.

    The tunnel, equipped with three turbine pumps, works to flush polluted water out of the stagnant canal, into the tidal currents of the New York Harbor, and oxygenate the waterway with cleaner water.

    It was partially re-activated in December, but prior to that had been completely shut down for repairs since 2010.

    “The $177 million upgrade of the flushing tunnel is a significant milestone in the city’s efforts to improve the health and cleanliness of the Gowanus Canal,” said Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Emily Lloyd.

    Built in 1911, the tunnel was designed to pump polluted water from the head of the canal into Buttermilk Channel, but since the late 1990s it has sent water in the opposite direction.

    The city will also reactivate a pumping station in June to improve water quality.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.1810339

  11. #131
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    Gowanus Is Counting on a Cleanup

    By RONDA KAYSEN



    Slide Show

    For decades, Gowanus was written off as a no man’s land between two darlings of brownstone Brooklyn — Carroll Gardens and Park Slope. Now the gritty industrial neighborhood is emerging from the shadows cast by its neighbors.

    Even as the area awaits a $500 million cleanup of its namesake, the Gowanus Canal, construction is underway for several residential developments, including a 700-unit project along the often-putrid waterway. Blocks that were once bleak now house shops for artisanal ice cream, sculptural hanging terrariums and specialty pickles, along with the macabre Morbid Anatomy Museum. The most potent symbol of transformation is a Whole Foods Market, which opened last year at Third Avenue and Third Street. Longtime residents and newcomers agree that this artists’ haven might soon mirror other industrial-turned-luxury enclaves like Williamsburg, Dumbo, TriBeCa and SoHo.

    “People have been talking about Gowanus for years — saying Gowanus is going to be the next SoHo — and I would think they were out of their minds,” said Jay Molishever, a Citi Habitats broker. “But lately I’ve been starting to believe it.”

    The neighborhood’s streets might seem desolate compared with bustling Smith Street in Carroll Gardens, but prices are up sharply. Data provided by the appraisal firm Miller Samuel show a rapidly evolving area. In the second quarter, the median sales price in Gowanus was $785,000, up 6.1 percent from the same period last year. The gains were more rapid than in Brooklyn over all, where median prices rose 4.5 percent to $575,000. The median rent in Gowanus in the second quarter was up 17.4 percent to $3,134 a month — more than double the rate of the borough, where the median rent rose 8.6 percent to $2,802.

    Part of the neighborhood’s appeal lies in its stellar location. The area, between the Gowanus Expressway and Wyckoff Street and Fourth Avenue and Hoyt Street, is close to several subways, beloved residential neighborhoods, Prospect Park and the Barclays Center. “It is in the heart of what is trending in Brooklyn,” said Jonathan J. Miller, the president of Miller Samuel. “It’s right in the thick of everything.”

    But two unyielding realities have kept it off the map: The canal is among the most polluted in the country, and the area is zoned for manufacturing, limiting residential growth. Soon that could change. In 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency declared the canal a Superfund site, opening the door for a massive cleanup. Brad Lander, the New York City Council member who represents Gowanus, is leading an effort to rezone the neighborhood for mixed-use development.

    Constructed in the 19th century, the Gowanus Canal was a dumping ground for manufactured-gas plants, foundries and paint factories. Today toxic sludge measures 22 feet deep in places, according to the E.P.A. In another indignity, raw sewage continues to spill into the 1.8-mile-long channel during heavy rainfall, contributing to pollution and the wretched smell.

    In 2017, the E.P.A. will begin dredging and capping the canal, which will take six years to complete. The city recently completed a $190 million upgrade of a wastewater pumping station and a flushing tunnel, substantially reducing sewage overflows and improving oxygen levels in the water. Local environmentalists have already noticed changes, including the arrival of blue crabs, cormorants and herons.

    “We’ve even had diamondback terrapin,” said Eymund Diegel, an environmental planner and a board member of the Gowanus Dredgers Canoe Club, which offers free rides down the canal.

    Wildlife is not the only newcomer. Buyers and investors are reinventing vacant lots and humble rowhouses. Two new townhouses at 330 and 332 Bond Street are under contract for above their $2.89 million asking prices. A single-family conversion at 463 Carroll Street is in contract for $2.65 million. Sales also recently began at 465 Carroll Street, a four-unit condominium, with the penthouse listed for $1.59 million. And the owners of Hotel Le Bleu on Fourth Avenue are building a boutique hotel on Third Avenue, to open October 2015.

    The rapid construction has rattled some residents, who also fear the loss of the neighborhood’s character. “So much of the neighborhood looks like rubble these days,” said Linda Mariano, a founder of Frogg, Friends and Residents of Greater Gowanus, a neighborhood coalition. “There seems to be a rush to choke, to strangle, to take over, to demolish.”

    Two major projects could reshape the landscape. Gowanus Green, a 774-unit affordable housing development with a two-acre park at Smith and Fifth Streets, could open in 2017. But the project, which needs city approval, is stalled until the site’s former owner, National Grid, completes a voluntary environmental cleanup.

    On a two-block stretch of Bond Street between Carroll and Second Streets, work is underway on a 700-unit rental, 363-365 Bond Street, overlooking the canal. Scheduled to open in early 2016, the two buildings will rise as high as 12 stories in places, dwarfing low-rise residences nearby. A waterfront esplanade will be open to the public. Prices have not been set for the market-rate units, and 20 percent will be reserved for affordable housing.

    The development has numerous critics who cite its potential burden on schools, infrastructure and the environment. “We’re going to be dredging this canal for the next decade, and we’re building housing right next door,” said David Briggs, an architect and a founder of Gowanus by Design, a neighborhood group. “Is it safe to live next to a Superfund site?”

    The Lightstone Group, the site’s developer, dismisses the criticism. “There’s a very vocal minority of people who live in the area that don’t want change,” said Mitchell C. Hochberg, Lightstone’s president. “It’s always the people that are against the project that speak the loudest.”

    Last month, the E.P.A. reached a tentative $20 million settlement in which Lightstone would remove toxic soil on the site, construct a bulkhead in the canal and ensure the project will not be a source of contamination in the future. The agreement is open to public comments until Oct. 8.

    Concerns about pollution and the neighborhood’s tendency to flood have not deterred residents. “I like to say we put the ‘super fun’ back into Superfund,” said Ursula F. Lawrence, 36, an organizer at the Writers Guild of America East, who lives in Gowanus with her husband, Jeffrey Pfeiffer, 35, a playwright and screenwriter. Last year, the couple moved to a $2,490-a-month one-bedroom in a new building on Third Avenue. “I liked the idea of living in new construction,” Ms. Lawrence said. “Nothing was going to break.”

    But not everyone is rushing to embrace Gowanus, least of all developers who are building along its border with Carroll Gardens. The developers of 345 Carroll Street, a 32-unit condominium a block and a half from the canal, describe the neighborhood as Carroll Gardens. A four-bedroom penthouse duplex is listed at $2.95 million, according to the marketing website.

    “These days the lines of a neighborhood are drawn by real estate agents,” said Sarah Zelermyer-Diaz, a broker at Douglas Elliman Real Estate who is marketing 335 Carroll Street, a 30-unit rental that is offering up to three months’ free rent to new tenants. Industrial-chic details like hanging Edison bulbs and exposed beams are a nod to the manufacturing roots of Gowanus, but the promotional materials rechristen it Carroll Gardens. Rents start at $3,350 for a one-bedroom, $4,500 for a two-bedroom and $6,700 for a three-bedroom.

    On a recent Sunday, families lingered on the corner of Union and Nevins Streets, savoring ice cream from Ample Hills Creamery. The shop, with flavors like Ooey Gooey Butter Cake, opened this summer, next to the Royal Palms Shuffleboard Club. Although $18 lobster rolls can be had at Littleneck, an urban clam shack on Third Avenue, the area is not overrun with trendy eateries yet. Plans to move the Brooklyn parole office to Gowanus in January also have raised concerns in the community.

    For some locals, the influx of shops (and shoppers) is a double-edged sword. “It’s wonderful to be able to walk down streets that you previously wouldn’t have,” said Aleksandra Scepanovic, the managing director of the Ideal Properties Group. “But there is also this fear: Oh no, what does that mean? Am I going to get priced out of my own neighborhood?”

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1...rification.php

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    Green projects aim to prevent sewage overflows in Brooklyn

    DEP announces grant winners, 3 in Brooklyn

    By Mary Frost


    A green roof project at 20 Lafayette St. in Fort Greene is one of six winners in the city’s Green
    Infrastructure Grant program, which aims to soak up excess rain water and reduce sewer overflows.
    Rendering courtesy of Two Trees Management

    On Thursday, NYC Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Emily Lloyd announced that six stormwater management projects have been chosen to receive more than $3 million in funding through the Green Infrastructure Grant program.

    Three of the grant winners are located in Brooklyn neighborhoods that have experienced flooding from stormwater overflows -- Gowanus, Sunset Park and Fort Greene.

    The grants are part of the city’s plan to soak up some of the rain that overwhelms the sewer system during storms, sending gushes of unpleasantness into basements and yards -- and into bodies of water like the Gowanus Canal and the East River.

    The overall strategy uses green approaches, like street trees and green roofs, to absorb excess rainwater. According to Riverkeeper.org, as little as one-twentieth of an inch of rain can overload the system.

    The Gowanus Arts Rooftop Farm will install a native plant garden and a large green roof vegetable garden to be enjoyed by the building’s tenants, including Spoke the Hub, which has a children's nutrition and cooking program. The project will manage more than 9,300 gallons of stormwater during each storm.

    The Salmar Building Roof Meadow in Sunset Park will contain plantings of native blue lupine, a perennial flower which flourishes in harsh climates with mediocre soils. (It also attracts the endangered Karner Blue Butterfly.) The project will manage 150,000 square feet, or almost 3.5 acres, of water-impervious area and 105,000 gallons of stormwater.

    Two Trees Management's 20 Lafayette in Fort Greene / Downtown will incorporate a green roof on the third floor roof. The space is inaccessible, and the project will be cultivated for pollinators. The project will manage 15,500 square feet and manage over 9,500 gallons of stormwater.


    The Gowanus Arts Rooftop Farm’s native plant garden. Rendering courtesy of DEP

    Other winning projects include the Madani Halal Rooftop Farm in Ozone Park, Queens, the Montefiore Moses Campus green roof project in the Bronx, and the Paradise on Earth Community Garden in the Bronx.

    Once completed, the six projects announced on Thursday will prevent more than 6 million gallons of stormwater from entering the combined sewer system each year, according to DEP.

    “By soaking up rain water these projects will help to reduce pollution in our local waterways, including the East River, Gowanus Canal and Jamaica Bay,” Lloyd said in a statement.

    "Implementing green roofs and blue roofs clean our air and waterways alike, utilizing the natural power of plant life,” Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams said. “Residents in Fort Greene, Gowanus, Sunset Park and beyond will benefit from these forward-thinking projects.”

    Absorbing water at its source

    In combined sewer system areas, storm water and sanitary sewage from toilets enter the same pipes on the way to the city’s water treatment plants. After a storm, the extra volume of water backs up and overflows into basements, yards and bodies of water.

    There are roughly 400 “outflows” in New York City, where rain and sewage wastes mix, a DEP spokesperson told the Brooklyn Eagle. This causes pollution in bodies of water that don’t readily flush out, such as Coney Island Creek and the Gowanus Canal.


    The Salmar Building Roof Meadow in Sunset Park. Rendering courtesy of DEP

    The New York City Green Infrastructure Plan aims to reduce the amount of rain that makes its way into the sewers, through the use of green materials that soak it up at the source.

    One major project, the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway Stormwater Management Plan, for example, would build water-absorbing infrastructure into the 14-mile Greenway path, soaking up half a billion gallons of rainwater during storms.

    Last September, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced additional funding for DEP’s capital program, which calls for more than $2 billion for water main and sewer upgrades over the next four years. DEP plans to install hundreds of curbside gardens and high level storm sewers in neighborhoods surrounding frequently flooded areas like Gowanus.

    http://www.brooklyneagle.com//articl...flows-brooklyn

  13. #133

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    Carroll St Bridge



    View north toward the Union St Bridge



    South of Carroll St, phase one of Lightstone's 363 - 365 Bond St



    ...which is supposed to eventually look like this.

  14. #134

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    Another eye- and volume-popping mega-project by ODA Architects may be coming to Brooklyn, and this week’s chosen neighborhood is Gowanus. A recently posted video by ODA delves into the thought-process of Eran Chen’s burgeoning firm and provides some shots of their recent work, including the provocative rendering shown here. We recognized the location only by the “Stop & Frisk Hands Off the Kids” text scrawled across the defunct Brooklyn Rapid Transit Powerhouse building (the “Bat Cave“) and pinpointed the project for the full-block parcel at 175-225 Third Street purchased by Kushner Companies and LIVWRKlast year.
    To read more
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  15. #135
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    those are some long narrow unbraced stilts

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