Page 4 of 22 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 323

Thread: Midtown / Midtown East Rezoning Plan

  1. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Fingers crossed.


    MAS Submits 17 Buildings to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for Evaluation

    The New York City Department of City Planning’s proposed East Midtown re-zoning has the potential to dramatically change the area and threaten the mix of old and new buildings that define the neighborhood as uniquely New York. In response to the City’s proposal, MAS is developing a holistic vision for the future of East Midtown that supports a vibrant mix of businesses, people, and of course, the buildings themselves – over a century’s worth of architecture. Historic preservation is a key component of this ongoing work.

    Today, of the 587 building located in the City’s study area, 32 are designated as individual landmarks. In October, as part of our comments on the draft scope for the environmental review, MAS identified 29 sites of historic and architectural merit not currently protected by New York City landmark status. These buildings represent the development periods that define East Midtown, from pre-Grand Central to Terminal City to the post-war Modern Movement. They also represent a mix of materials, styles and uses that contribute to East Midtown’s visual diversity and sense of place.

    East Midtown is certainly known for iconic landmarks such as the Chrysler Building, Lever House, and Grand Central Terminal (which celebrates 100 years in 2013, thanks in part to the work of MAS.) As reported in today’s New York Times, from the initial list of historic resources identified, MAS further refined the selection to 17 buildings that best convey historic, architectural and cultural significance, as determined by site visits, research, and collaboration with experts on the MAS Preservation Committee. These 17 buildings have been submitted for evaluation to the Landmarks Preservation Commission:


    • 4 E. 43rd Street (former Mehlin Piano Company Building; Andrew J. Thomas, 1916) J
    • 18-20 E. 50th Street (former Grand Rapids Furniture Company; Rouse & Goldstone, 1915)
    • 270 Park Avenue (former Union Carbide Building; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1960)
    • 445 Park Avenue (Kahn & Jacobs, 1947)
    • 450 Park Avenue (former Franklin National Bank Building; Emery Roth & Sons, 1972)
    • 661 Lexington Avenue (former Babies’ Hospital; York & Sawyer, 1902)
    • Center for Fiction (former Mercantile Library; Henry Otis Chapman, 1932)
    • Graybar Building (Sloan & Robertson, 1927)
    • Hotel Intercontinental Barclay (Cross & Cross, 1926)
    • The Lexington (former Hotel Lexington; Schultze & Weaver, 1929)
    • Marriott East Side (former Shelton Hotel; Arthur Loomis Harmon, 1923)
    • One Grand Central Place (former Lincoln Building; J. E. R. Carpenter; Dwight P. Robinson, 1929)
    • Pershing Square Building (John Sloan of York & Sawyer, 1923)
    • Postum Building (Cross & Cross, 1924)
    • Swedish Seamen’s Church (former New York Bible Society; Wilfred Edward Anthony, 1920)
    • Vanderbilt Concourse Building (Warren & Wetmore, 1916)
    • Yale Club (James Gamble Rogers, 1915)


    http://mas.org/mas-submits-17-buildi...or-evaluation/
    These wangs forgot about the Hotel Roosevelt and many other nice structures.

  2. #47

    Default

    That SOM ring over Grand Central is the dumbest freaking thing I have ever seen.

  3. #48

    Default

    It does look weird but there is certain appeal to it. The plan was created as speculative fantasy anyway. I don't think SOM were being fully serious - the projects' creators probably realized how silly distant future urbanism tends to look in retrospect. IMO it holds a bit of the hokey appeal invoked by futurist visions of yesteryear:


  4. #49
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    When Trade Shows Were Both Grand and Central

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP



    The New York Times

    An Elco cruiser being hauled along 30th Street on its way to Grand Central Palace,
    north of the terminal at 480 Lexington Avenue. It was the city's chief exhibition hall in the early 20th century.

    In the preservation debate over Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s rezoning plan for east Midtown, one of the most conspicuous landmarks is a building that hasn’t existed for almost half a century, yet still exerts a strong influence over the neighborhood.

    Grand Central Palace, on Lexington Avenue, between 46th and 47th Streets, was New York’s principal exhibition hall for 40 years: home of the International Flower Show, the Greater New York Poultry Exposition, the Westminster Kennel Club dog show, the Sportsmen’s and Vacation Show, the National Photographic Show, the International Beauty Shop Owners Convention, the Frozen Foods Exposition, the National Plastics Exposition, the International Textile Exposition, the National Modern Homes Exposition, the American Medical Association Exposition, the city’s Golden Anniversary Exposition of 1948 and — in the greatest annual generator of nautical daydreams and logistical nightmares — the National Motor Boat Show.

    (You think it’s tough driving in Midtown? Try it in a 54-foot Wheeler cruiser with a flying bridge.)

    In 1963, 52 years after Grand Central Palace opened and a decade after the last show was held there, the 13-story building was demolished. A 44-story office tower, 245 Park Avenue, took its place.

    But even today, you can clearly follow the shadow of the Palace by walking up Lexington Avenue from 47th Street. Expositions and conventions brought thousands of travelers to town. Accommodations sprouted shoulder to shoulder along “Hotel Alley“: the Winthrop (now the Roger Smith), the Lexington, the Shelton (now the Marriott East Side), the Montclair (now the W New York) and the Beverly (now the Benjamin). Across Lexington Avenue, and in a different league, were the Barclay (now the InterContinental Barclay) and the Waldorf-Astoria.

    All but one of these hotels have been identified by the Municipal Art Society, the New York Landmarks Conservancy and the Historic Districts Council as worthy of consideration for landmark status. (The Waldorf-Astoria is the exception. It already is an official landmark.) Preservationists fear that the increase in permissible building density envisioned in the mayor’s rezoning plan would make it economically feasible to demolish structures like these.


    Uris Buildings Corporation Grand Central Palace occupied the block of Lexington Avenue between 46th and 47th Streets.

    The exhibition areas occupied the first four floors. Interior spaces were large enough to accommodate a pool for log-rolling contests at the 1936 Sportsmen’s Show (below).


    The New York Times

    Had there been a strong landmarks law in 1963, there surely would have been a fight over Grand Central Palace. A good case could have been made for its architecture, too.
    It was designed by Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stem, who also worked together on Grand Central Terminal itself. The Lexington Avenue facade of the Palace had a portico of four colossal columns. A two-story arcade — illuminated at night — ringed the top of the building. The main exhibition area was ingeniously carved out of the second and third floors to create an interior volume 48 feet high. The main floor could accommodate 94 booths, typically about 320 square feet each. (I’ve lived in smaller apartments.)

    But let’s be honest. Grand Central Palace was not about architecture. It was a setting where adults could play out their fantasies under the pretense of doing business; that is, unless you’d been inducted there into the armed forces during World War II or had a dust-up with the Internal Revenue Service, whose New York headquarters were there in the 1950s.

    Even the staid New York Times got into the spirit of things. “Grand Central Palace All A-Cackle With 7,200 Poultry Show Entrants,” said a headline on Jan. 4, 1951, under a photograph of a young woman with a long-tailed bird on her shoulder: “Florence Awe using ‘Lady Amhurst,’ a pheasant, as a hat.”

    The perennial tangle between automotive and nautical traffic before and after the boat show also allowed Times copy editors to let down their hair a bit. “Boats Go Bounding O’er Main Streets,” was the headline on Jan. 8, 1953, heralding the arrival of the show.

    Assessing the home furnishings show in The Times of Sept. 18, 1952, Betty Pepis wrote: “All the items that could — and, it seemed to this reporter, many things that shouldn’t go into a home — will be displayed by more than 400 exhibitors.” With a nod to the impending presidential election, Elizabeth Draper designed a study for Dwight D. Eisenhower in bold strokes of red, white and blue. Melanie Kahane’s study for Adlai E. Stevenson was of muted gray and beige. You know how that turned out.

    One of the greatest annual draws was the flower show, which offered azaleas, camellias, lilies, peonies, petunias, primroses, roses and tulips in early March, when such color and fragrance in Midtown would have been welcome. As a reporter, I imagine it was a pleasant way to spend an afternoon. Yet I don’t envy the writer who had to describe it year in and year out.

    “‘Spring followed by summer’ is the forecast today and all through the week for Grand Central Palace,” was how she opened her account on March 5, 1951. Two years later, on March 9, 1953, her lead paragraph began, “‘Spring leading into summer’ is the forecast for one small part of New York this week.” I’m not going to name names. We’ve all done it.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20.../?ref=nyregion

  5. #50
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LeCom View Post
    It does look weird but there is certain appeal to it. The plan was created as speculative fantasy anyway. I don't think SOM were being fully serious - the projects' creators probably realized how silly distant future urbanism tends to look in retrospect. IMO it holds a bit of the hokey appeal invoked by futurist visions of yesteryear:

    Note that the "future" as it was projected then did not include this charmless flat-top glass/aluminum crap we call Moderninsm/International. Look at all the elegant anti-modernist spires and crowns in the background... Its embarrasing to see what the future actually brought; a flat-lined monotoned skyline dominated with aluminum and glass occluding the buildings that are truly beautiful, representing an artistically destitute society. Sad.

  6. #51
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    UrbanToronto.ca
    Posts
    371

    Default

    Half the buildings in that image have flat roofs.

  7. #52

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed007Toronto View Post
    Half the buildings in that image have flat roofs.
    Used to support elevated railways hundreds of feet up in the air. Just imagine an accident with train cars plummeting to the streets below.

  8. #53

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    When Trade Shows Were Both Grand and Central

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    The New York Times

    An Elco cruiser being hauled along 30th Street on its way to Grand Central Palace,
    north of the terminal at 480 Lexington Avenue. It was the city's chief exhibition hall in the early 20th century....

    Grand Central Palace, on Lexington Avenue, between 46th and 47th Streets, was New York’s principal exhibition hall for ....

    In 1963, 52 years after Grand Central Palace opened and a decade after the last show was held there, the 13-story building was demolished. A 44-story office tower, 245 Park Avenue, took its place.

    But even today, you can clearly follow the shadow of the Palace by walking up Lexington Avenue from 47th Street....


    Uris Buildings Corporation Grand Central Palace occupied the block of Lexington Avenue between 46th and 47th Streets.

    The exhibition areas occupied the first four floors. Interior spaces were large enough to accommodate a pool for log-rolling contests at the 1936 Sportsmen’s Show (below).

    I read that article and was saddened. NY always has been infested by pigs who pose as developers. That beautiful structure was replaced by a massive POS. I pray that 245 Park, which is the ugliest structure on That stretch of Park, isn't too big to be razed if the rezoning happens.
    Last edited by londonlawyer; December 21st, 2012 at 07:39 AM.

  9. #54
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    Not in our lifetime. Think I'm willing to give up the oldie across the street.
    Last edited by Tectonic; December 21st, 2012 at 03:17 PM.

  10. #55

    Default

    Let them double the FAR for the site. It will then get replaced.

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    I read that article and was saddened. NY always has been infested by pigs who pose as developers. That beautiful structure was replaced by a massive POS. I pray that 245 Park, which is the ugliest structure on That stretch of Park, isn't too big to be razed if the rezoning happens.

  11. #56
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    Found this on flickr, Midtown from Graybar Building in June 1928:


    eralsoto
    More here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8534413...oto_5601501447


  12. #57
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed007Toronto View Post
    Half the buildings in that image have flat roofs.
    Half?

  13. #58

    Default

    Grand Central crisis

    By STEVE CUOZZO
    Last Updated:11:37 PM, January 13, 2013
    Posted:10:58 PM, January 13, 2013
    Microsoft just announced it’s moving its New York headquarters to a new office building at Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street. Construction has started on a new home for Coach Inc. at Hudson Yards. And it’s old news that Conde Nast is moving to the World Trade Center. But which big companies are moving their front offices to Midtown’s fabled east side?
    Not one — even though it should be the city’s most desirable neighborhood for corporate headquarters, with its transit links and unparalleled hotels, stores and restaurants.
    That’s why East Midtown rezoning is desperately needed. The vast Grand Central district isn’t just “obsolescent”; it’suselessfor companies wanting to move or grow and increasingly irrelevant overall. Without prompt attention, it will tragically devolve into a well-located back-office district.
    No government decision due this year matters as much as Midtown East rezoning. The stakes are huge: Will Manhattan retain its pre-eminent position among world business capitals? Or will institutionalized decay in its heart reduce it to also-ran status?
    The long-overdue proposal from the Department of City Planning would allow construction of larger new buildings than are now permitted in a 78-block swath of the East 40s and 50s. Mayor Bloomberg wants it passed before he leaves office; the City Council must vote by October.
    It’s a fourth-quarter, hail-Mary play after years of delay in bringing the area into the 21st century.
    The Manhattan market draws its juice from new office towers that draw glamorous tenants seeking a showcase home with advanced electronic, security and environmental features.
    Yet once-supreme Midtown East is frozen in aspic. Zoning written in 1961 made major new development there near-impossible. Existing buildings, now 66 years old on average and burdened with antiquated systems and cramped floor plates, are dinosaurs facing functional extinction in the digital age.
    In much of the district, they can’t even be replaced with modern structuresno larger than the ones there now. That’s because most of the buildings predate the 1961 rules, which shrank the size of permissible reconstruction. Existing structures were grandfathered in — not so, potential new ones.
    As a result, leading companies in need of state-of-the-art new facilities are movinganywherebut along or astride the Park Avenue corridor that was once their first choice.
    But council members are being furiously lobbied against the rezoning. Preservationists, “congestion”-phobes, advocates for “higher civic aspirations” and just plain obstructionists want to kill or dilute the measure — or at least delay it ’til Bloomberg’s gone.
    They howl that larger, taller skyscrapers might, God forbid, cast shadows on or diminish the grandeur of masterpieces like the Chrysler and Seagram buildings and Grand Central Terminal.
    Meanwhile, landlords who know how desperate the situation is pull their punches for fear of making the fading precinct sound even less appealing than so much of it has become.
    Yes, a number of marquee headquarters tenants such as Citigroup remain. But vacancies are inching up toward 13 percent (as counted by real-estate brokerage CBRE). More ominously, corporate momentum of the kind that sets the pace for the commercial scene is all on the way out, not in.
    City Hall warns that without change, tenants who’ve been attracted to East Midtown “in the past would begin to look elsewhere.” In fact, they’ve beengoingelsewhere for many years.
    Time Warner moved to Columbus Circle, Hearst to Eighth Avenue and Bank of America to Sixth Avenue and 42nd Street. Law firm Proskauer Rose chose 11 Times Square, where Microsoft is headed as well.
    Two large law firms chose brand-new 250 W. 55th St. One of them, Kaye Scholer, is leaving 425 Park Ave., its home of 55 years. The building is so antiquated, its owners plan to tear it down for a new one designed by architect Norman Foster. But because the relic is “overbuilt” by 1961 rules, they must keep 25 percent of its steel merely to put up a same-size new structure.
    That will complicate and maybe compromise the effort. But it’s that, or waitfour yearsfor new zoning to kick in,ifit’s approved.
    The “sunrise provision” and other complexities with which the city hamstrung the rezoning proposal are needless. But even with flaws, it’s a must to liberate East Midtown from its straitjacket.
    Until then, the area’s only hope is ambitious upgrade of older properties, as is happening at 280 Park Ave. But patch-and-fix isn’t the optimal future for a neighborhood that still embodies the magic of Manhattan as no other.
    The goal is to reaffirm its premier status. It will only happen by allowing new landmarks — big, tall and worthy of their setting — to rise in the century ahead.
    scuozzo@nypost.com



    Read more:Grand Central crisis - NYPOST.comhttp://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion...#ixzz2HxNXlj8u

  14. #59
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    and Bank of America to Sixth Avenue and 42nd Street...

    This guy is such an idiot. Like 42nd & 6th isn't midtown?

  15. #60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    and Bank of America to Sixth Avenue and 42nd Street...

    This guy is such an idiot. Like 42nd & 6th isn't midtown?
    Well, he is discussing the rezoning of midtown east.

Page 4 of 22 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software