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Thread: Coney Island "Renaissance"

  1. #61

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    Although I did enjoy a recent village to Coney Island on my last visit, I feel it still has a long way to go before it becomes an attraction on the NYC visitors' circuit.

    The new subway station and baseball stadium are great additions, however the backdrop with the menacing tower blocks in the background are a letdown.

    Perhaps any redevelopment plans need to look into mixing more retail, dining, and after-hours venues, such as a movie theater complex, to improve the overall appeal.

  2. #62

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    The new subway station and baseball stadium are great additions, however the backdrop with the menacing tower blocks in the background are a letdown.


    Whats the big deal about the towers? I saw them, who cares? Its NYC, what do you expect? :roll:

  3. #63
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    Some of them are city projects and they're kinda ominous looking. The Luna Park complex is also right by the area and they look like projects, though I recently found out they're not. They need to get completely re-bricked though so hopefully they'll be a little cheerier in the future.

  4. #64

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    There will be a public park built around the Parachute Jump. It will be called Parachute Park. The Jump will be lit. I will try to find out a timetable on this.

  5. #65
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    Much coolness, I saw it on the yahoo board. It's a standing mystery of the world... why the Jump has been unlit for all these years...

  6. #66

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    Yay!

    Many of the 500 illustrations in Coney Island Lost and Found are images from Denson’s 5000-plus photo archive dating from the island’s beginnings as a seaside resort in the 1800s right up to the opening of the Brooklyn Cyclones’ KeySpan Park in 2001. The Parachute Jump, the sole survivor of Steeplechase Park, is a central motif.

    Denson tracked down Chuck Steen, the Jump’s daredevil chief mechanic, who explained every aspect of the ride’s operation, including "riding the hook" to the top to rescue stranded passengers. Steen also explained the real reason for the ride’s frequent stalls: "If we weren’t doing much business, and two girls came on and they looked like screamers, we’d send them up about two hundred feet and turn the motor off," he says in the book.
    :P

  7. #67

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    Here is a look at the CIDC public presentation from last week

    http://www.thecidc.org/9-30publicpresfinal.pdf

  8. #68

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    I found out the Parachute Jump will be lit next summer!!!!

    Haven't got any solid info on a timetable for Parachute Park.

  9. #69

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    Construction at the CI Subway Terminal is supposed to be totally completed in mid 2005. Does anybody have any idea about what is going in the first floor shopping mall? Any specific stores or restaurant names? I haven't heard one name mentioned yet? Very Strange. Remember all the publicity around the Atlantic Terminal.

  10. #70

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by muscle1313
    Construction at the CI Subway Terminal is supposed to be totally completed in mid 2005. Does anybody have any idea about what is going in the first floor shopping mall? Any specific stores or restaurant names? I haven't heard one name mentioned yet? Very Strange. Remember all the publicity around the Atlantic Terminal.
    McDonalds will be a primary tenant in the western portion of the building. Last word, it had two floors.

  12. #72

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    Man I hope Coney can do better than McDonald's. How about Red Lobster?

  13. #73

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    Parachute Jump update

    Parachute Jump to be
    Coney Island's beacon

    The Brooklyn Papers

    A piece of Coney Island
    history is in line for a 21stcentury
    makeover.
    The vintage Parachute
    Jump, which rises high above
    the ocean in Brooklyn, could
    eventually anchor a pavilion
    featuring a restaurant, park and
    exhibition space, said Jonathan
    Cohen-Litant of the Van Alen
    Institute, which is working
    with the Coney Island Development
    Corp.
    Designers will be invited to
    submit their own "Parachute
    Pavilion" plan for a currently
    vacant 7,000-square-foot lot
    owned by the city, Cohen-
    Litant said Tuesday.
    Currently, the long-dormant
    ride serves as part of the background
    in right field at Keyspan
    Park, home of the minor-league
    Brooklyn Cyclones. Borough
    President Marty Markowitz
    likes to call the city landmark
    "Brooklyn's Eiffel Tower."
    Details on the competition
    will be released later this
    week, according to Cohen-
    Litant, although he had no
    idea when a winner might be
    selected. On its Web site, the
    Van Alen Institute says the
    new facility will operate yearround
    in an effort to draw visitors
    to the Brooklyn neighborhood
    during the off-season.
    "This is going to be something
    truly beautiful," said
    Councilman Domenic Recchia,
    whose district includes a portion
    of Coney Island. "We're going
    to light up the Jump and it will
    be a beautiful sight for all of
    south Brooklyn. And that's just
    the beginning," he said, alluding
    to the formulation of a master
    plan for the redevelopment of
    Coney Island.
    The ride dates back to the
    golden days of Coney Island,
    when it was one of the major attractions
    with the still-running
    Cyclone roller coaster. Two
    years ago, the top half of the
    262-foot-tall former thrill ride
    was taken down for renovation
    and many parts were replaced or
    repaired and repainted.
    The Parachute Jump was
    designed by retired Naval Air
    Commander James F. Strong
    in the mid-1930s to train paratroopers.
    But Strong began to
    receive so many requests for
    rides on his contraption that he
    developed a more publicfriendly
    version that included
    seats for two and shock absorbers
    at the base. He successfully
    operated a 200-foot
    jump in Chicago and then applied
    for permits to build and
    operate a jump at the 1939
    New York World's Fair.
    At the close of the Fair in
    1940, Edward Tilyou purchased
    it and brought the jump to
    Steeplechase Park. It opened for
    the 1941 season and offered 12
    two-seater chutes.
    Steeplechase Park closed in
    1964, but the ride did not shut
    down until 1968, when weather
    conditions and high maintenance
    costs led to its demise. It
    was declared a city landmark
    in 1977.
    — with Associated Press

  14. #74

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    Olympic marathon
    would start in Coney

    By Jotham Sederstrom

    The Brooklyn Papers
    Coney Island, which earlier this year
    lost indoor volleyball in the city's 2012
    Olympic bid, has instead been awarded
    the start of a marquee event of the summer
    games — the Olympic marathon —
    according to the city's final proposal, to
    be revealed in Switzerland on Monday.
    Sources close to the project told The Brooklyn
    Papers this week that planners with
    NYC2012, the private group led by Deputy
    Mayor Daniel Doctoroff that is responsible for
    putting together the city's bid, positioned the
    marathon to begin in Coney Island and end at
    the proposed Jets football stadium on Manhattan's
    West Side. Along the way, runners would
    cross more than a dozen Brooklyn neighborhoods
    on their way to Downtown Brooklyn,
    where they would traverse the Brooklyn
    Bridge.

    The inclusion is a boon for the former beach
    resort neighborhood, which had been slated to
    host indoor volleyball until NYC2012 officials
    decided instead to place that event at the Continental
    Airlines Arena in New Jersey. Bruce Ratner's
    proposed Atlantic Yards arena in Prospect
    Heights is slated for boxing and gymnastics.
    Until now, the summer of 2012 was shaping
    up to be a very uneventful one for Coney
    Island, whose leaders were faced with being
    left out of the Olympic plans altogether, and
    whose hopes were dashed that a sportsplex for

    athletics might finally
    be realized through construction
    of an indoor volleyball
    arena.
    "Coney Island will start off
    the beginning of the marathon,"
    confirmed Councilman Domenic
    Recchia, who said he has
    discussed the Olympics bid in
    detail with Doctoroff. "It's going
    to bring the Olympics and
    everyone else to south Brooklyn."
    The marathon route, which
    had not been included in previous
    drafts of the bid, was included
    in the detailed, 600-page
    "Bid Book" to be presented to
    the International Olympic Committee
    in Lausanne, Switzerland.
    There, officials will grapple
    over the assets and liabilities
    of bids submitted not only by
    New York, but Paris, London,
    Madrid and Moscow.
    The host city will be chosen
    in July.
    On Thursday, Gov. George
    Pataki, Mayor Michael Bloomberg
    and Brooklyn-born Athens
    Gold Medalist Justin Gatlin
    joined other Olympians and
    Paralympians to officially sendoff
    the bid.
    From the Coney Island boardwalk,
    runners would travel north
    on Ocean Parkway, which would
    eventually lead them to the borders
    of Prospect Park and parts
    of Brownstone Brooklyn, said a
    source familiar with the plans.
    The race would end at the
    Manhattan stadium after a
    swoop through Times Square.
    Recchia, who has lobbied to
    bring beach volleyball to Coney
    Island despite plans for the sport
    to be played in Williamsburg,
    said that he spoke to Doctoroff
    in August.
    Although beach volleyball
    will remain in Williamsburg,
    and indoor volleyball in New
    Jersey, Recchia said that Doctoroff's
    decision to start the
    marathon in Coney Island
    would likely draw more eyes to
    the beach.
    "Hopefully, people will
    spend the whole day, or even
    several days, in Coney Island
    because of this," said Recchia.
    "It's going to be a great economic
    boost."

  15. #75

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    Glad we finally got confirmation in the news of the lighting. I heard this coming summer.


    Brooklyn Papers Excerpt -

    "This is going to be something
    truly beautiful," said
    Councilman Domenic Recchia,
    whose district includes a portion
    of Coney Island. "We're going
    to light up the Jump and it will
    be a beautiful sight for all of
    south Brooklyn.

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