Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011 LastLast
Results 121 to 135 of 160

Thread: Crime in New York City

  1. #121
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Murders Are Up in New York and Other Cities

    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Published: December 27, 2006
    Filed at 5:55 p.m. ET

    NEW YORK (AP) -- After many years of decline, the number of murders climbed this year in New York and many other major U.S. cities, reaching their highest levels in a decade in some places. Among the reasons given: gangs, drugs, the easy availability of illegal guns, a disturbing tendency among young people to pull guns when they do not get the respect they demand, and, in Houston at least, an influx of Hurricane Katrina evacuees.

    In New York, where the city reported 579 homicides through Dec. 24 -- a nearly 10 percent increase from the year before -- the spike is mostly the result of an unusually large number of ''reclassified homicides,'' or those involving victims who were shot or stabbed years ago but did not die until this year. Thirty-five such deaths have been added to this year's toll, compared with an annual average of about a dozen.

    At the same time, Police Department spokesman Paul Browne noted that this year's total is only slightly higher than last year's 539 homicides -- the city's lowest death toll in more than 40 years.

    Browne blamed the rise in part on the availability of guns, particularly weapons from out of state. The city this year sued dozens of out-of-state gun shops that it says are responsible for many of the illegal weapons on the streets of New York.

    In Chicago, homicides through the first 11 months of the year were up 3.3 percent compared with the same period in 2005, reversing a four-year decline. A police spokeswoman said gang violence has been a contributing factor.

    In New Haven, Conn., there were 23 homicides as of Tuesday, compared with 15 in 2004 and in 2005. Police Chief Francisco Ortiz said that about half of this year's killings involve young people settling disputes with guns instead of fists.

    ''They're all struggling with this thing about respect and pride,'' Ortiz said. ''It's about respect. It's about revenge. It's about having a reputation. It's about turf and it's about girls.''

    Houston police attribute the 15 percent increase in the homicide count to the influx of Katrina evacuees from the Gulf Coast.

    ''So we expect that to settle,'' Lt. Murray Smith said. ''We're hoping it will go down.''

    New Orleans, with its post-Katrina exodus, is the only major U.S. city that saw a sharp decline in the number of homicides. There were 154 in New Orleans this year as of Monday, said police spokesman Sgt. Jeffrey Johnson, down from 210 in 2005. But the city was largely empty during the fall and winter of 2005-06, and even now has only about half of its pre-Katrina population of 455,000.

    Some cities, like Cincinnati -- which has had 83 homicides so far, up from 79 in 2005 -- posted their highest numbers ever. Others saw their highest death tolls in years.

    Oakland, Calif., had 148 homicides as of Wednesday, up 57 percent from last year and the highest in more than a decade. Philadelphia's 2006 homicide total was 403 as of Wednesday, the first time the number has topped 400 in nearly a decade. There were 380 killings in all of 2005.

    Philadelphia officials have struggled all year to reduce the violence. In July, Mayor John F. Street gave a televised address in which pleaded with young people: ''Lay down your weapons. Do it now. Choose education over violence.''

    A few cities reported slight decreases in murders. Los Angeles' total was down about 4 percent to 464 homicides through Dec. 23. San Francisco's fell about 15 percent. San Francisco Police Sgt. Steve Mannina said the drop is partly due to increased patrols in violence-prone areas and more overtime approved by the police chief.

    The FBI does not release its national crime statistics until several months after the end of the year. The bureau's statistics for the first six months of 2006 showed an increase of 1.4 percent in the number of murders in the first half of 2006 compared with the first six months of 2005.

    Andrew Karmen, a criminologist at John Jay College in New York, said that while there are various theories for the drop in murders in New York and other cities in the 1990s, no one knows for sure why it happened. And if they are going up again, no one knows the reason for that, either, he said.

    He noted that police departments tend to take credit when the murder rate goes down. ''When crime goes up it will be interesting to see whether they will accept responsibility,'' Karmen said.
    Last edited by antinimby; December 27th, 2006 at 09:12 PM.

  2. #122
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    In New York, where the city reported 579 homicides through Dec. 24 -- a nearly 10 percent increase from the year before -- the spike is mostly the result of an unusually large number of ''reclassified homicides,'' or those involving victims who were shot or stabbed years ago but did not die until this year. Thirty-five such deaths have been added to this year's toll, compared with an annual average of about a dozen.
    This very subject was written about in a very recent NYT article.

  3. #123

    Default

    New York Magazine

    The Criminal Record

    Once again, it was a down year for crime in New York. But that doesn't mean we're some sort of post-crime Utopia just quite yet. A look at what kind of crime persists and why, a thought experiment on how we could make murder disappear completely, the emergence of crime porn, and more.

    The Killing of Murder

    As the homicide rate continues to drop, the impossible beckons: What would it take to go all the way to zero?


    Where Murder Won't Go Quietly

    A new kind of gang is making northeast Brooklyn the deadliest place in the city.


    The Bleeding Edge

    I went looking for an authentic, old-school New York experience, and it found me.


    Crime Porn (With Simulated Action)

    What happens when rising demand for real crime video collides with plummeting crime rates? The media prank Criminals Gone Wild.


    What a Safer City Really Looks Like

    Map in PDF

  4. #124
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Q. and A. on New York City Murder Data

    There is, almost every day, at least one murder in New York City — the current average is roughly 500 killings a year. But of course, no two are the same — neither the lives of the victims nor who they were, nor how they died or where.

    The New York Times has produced and put online an interactive database with maps and charts to allow anyone who wants to look at big picture trends, investigate individual neighborhoods, or examine shifts in the demographics of victims and known perpetrators. A few clicks could, for instance, reveal the deadliest blocks in Brooklyn last year. Another will compare them with earlier years.

    This project mines public records with additional reporting, and will be updated regularly. This is the combined effort of departments across the newsroom, and has been in the works for more than a year. Those involved include reporters who specialize in databases and develop interactive applications, graphic artists, Web producers, and journalists on the Metro staff.

    Murder: New York City 2003-2009 - Interactive Database

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20.../?ref=nyregion

  5. #125
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    New York City crime down 40 percent from same time in '08

    BY Rocco Parascandola

    September 18th 2009

    Crime is still falling in the city, despite tough economic times and a smaller police force stretched thin by counter-terrorism operations.

    There was a 12% drop across seven major crime categories - including murder - in the first nine months of the year, compared with the same period last year.

    There have been 320 murders so far - about the same number that would have been killed in a two-month span during the height of the crack epidemic.

    The NYPD has taken flak for anti-crime efforts, especially stop-and-frisks, in minority communities - but the department says those areas benefit the most from the resulting reduction in violence.

    "If the murder rate stayed where it was in 2001, there would have been 760 additional homicides in New York City," Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly told a civic group this week.

    "History tells us 90% of the victims would have been minorities from low income neighborhoods."

    The plunging crime stats are particularly significant given the challenges the NYPD faces: a shrinking force, budget cuts, and anti-terror programs that take 1,000 officers a day from other crime-fighting.

    There are still problem spots. Assaults were up slightly citywide, and murders in East Harlem's 23rd Precinct shot up to seven from two last year.

    East New York's 75th Precinct saw a murder surge, too: 16, up from 11 last year. The neighborhood, which traditionally has led the city in murders, is a target of Operation Impact, which floods a crime-prone area with uniformed rookies.

    Citywide, the murder rate has dropped nearly 15% this year, and it's likely that by year's end, the number will be around 450.

    That's well below the total of 497 recorded two years ago, which at the time represented the lowest number since the NYPD started tracking the category in 1963. Before then, murders were often not recorded until an arrest had been made.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/ny_c...me_in_08_.html



  6. #126

    Cool Illegal Street Vendors Busted at Fulton St and Broadway

    Today. Mass arrests!!

    Tourists need to be more aware that the knock-off handbags and sunglasses are illegal and when they buy them they are supporting organized crime.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1639.jpg 
Views:	129 
Size:	60.1 KB 
ID:	7623  

  7. #127
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Deputize me and I'll help the City get a lot more of those ladies-from-out-of-town-looking-for-"Designer"-bags under control

    (among other folks)

  8. #128

    Default

    What do you have in mind?

  9. #129
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    I'd start with the illegal street vendors outside my building. Write 'em tickets every 10 minutes so that it's no longer worth their while.

  10. #130

    Default

    Two funny stories on this:

    1) My firm occasionally invites different kinds of vendors into our lobby to hawk their crap to employees. Last year, they had a bunch of the guys who sell the counterfeit 'designer' bags, etc. This was pretty outrageous, given that the clothing/apparel companies that make the real stuff are big clients of ours. Anyway, I remarked to my boss' secretary about the irony of this in passing; she hadn't seen them earlier, but put in a call to some higher-ups, and the counterfeiters were removed instantly. The higher-ups, she later told me, were more than a little concerned that this might leak out and cause big-time damage with the clothing/apparel clients.

    2) From time to time the illegal vendors set up shop outside my office. I noticed once that one of them had an earpiece/microphone and was speaking into the mic. Within moments, he bundled up his stuff and disappeared around the corner. Shortly after, two cops on the beat walked by. As soon as they passed, the vendor returned. I caught up with the cops and told them that there were vendors with earpieces on the lookout for them and asked if they knew those guys were aware of where they were. They smiled, said, "Yeah, we know exactly who's working this corner. They won't be in business much longer," and walked off. I can't remember seeing any counterfeiters since then.

  11. #131
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,777

    Default

    Now, i agree that people should not be making money off of other people's work, but the thing that annoys me is when people buy NOT for craftsmanship, practicality, or even that (in my mind) lame appelation of "style", but just to buy a name.

    LV would be a classic example.

    If the bags did not COST $500+ to buy in a store, people would not want to BUY a knock off.

    How many fake pairs of Keds do you see being sold? Timex watches? JCPenny Handbags?

    I can appreciate a well crafted, good looking, well designed piece of apparel, electronics, or other item, but when people start making money off a name, and a name alone, I have very little sympathy for them when others are making money off of their name and not off of their product.

  12. #132

    Default

    I think the real issue is the right to intellectual property. If that right doesn't exist, then inventors/innovators have little incentive to sink money into creating something new.

    Why? Because they'll be undercut by copycats who didn't need to fund the R&D, market studies, etc., and can therefore turn the same profit margins at a lower price. You look at Russia, China or any other place where intellectual property rights don't exist, and see how many great homegrown companies and innovations come out of there.

    The victims of counterfeiters aren't some class of snob who wants an expensive label; it's first and foremost the people who sink money into creating something new, whether it's a new handbag design or a computer program or a song. When they can't get any return on their investment because somebody's pirating it, they'll generally be smart enough not to keep wasting time and money on innovating. At that point, we all miss out on the "what ifs" that never come into fruition.

  13. #133
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    I think the real issue is the right to intellectual property. If that right doesn't exist, then inventors/innovators have little incentive to sink money into creating something new.
    That sits fine with me for things that have actual value, not the latest in a series of fashion accessories whose only purpose it to look different.

    TBH, the bags are fugly. They match nothing and are not handy in any way. The only purpose they have in this world is to let others know how much you spent on it.

    Why? Because they'll be undercut by copycats who didn't need to fund the R&D, market studies, etc., and can therefore turn the same profit margins at a lower price. You look at Russia, China or any other place where intellectual property rights don't exist, and see how many great homegrown companies and innovations come out of there.
    So you are saying Nike should be entitled to make its sneakers in China because of all the R+D they did, but China does not have the rights to Nikke?

    The victims of counterfeiters aren't some class of snob who wants an expensive label; it's first and foremost the people who sink money into creating something new, whether it's a new handbag design or a computer program or a song.
    You are skirting right around the topic. Is LV a company that needs this? How much did they plunk down in the "invention" of the handbag. Don't bring up the poor single mother of 7 that invented the hip bag that charges your cell phone from body motion as the spokesperson for the industry at large.

    Again, if LV sold their bags for what they were WORTH, not what they were valued at, nobody would buy a fake for $50 when they could get the real thing for $70.


    When they can't get any return on their investment because somebody's pirating it, they'll generally be smart enough not to keep wasting time and money on innovating. At that point, we all miss out on the "what ifs" that never come into fruition.
    Yeah, what a shame. What would we do without the latest in Fashion trends? Wear the same clothes we wore LAST YEAR??!? *shudder*

  14. #134
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    If full ownership of a brand is not protected by copyright then fraud abounds. The very fact that counterfeiters knock off the upscale brands is proof of their value.

  15. #135

    Default

    Rather than single fashion out as something that "we," or the state, thinks is inherently worthless, extending intellectual rights to any innovation deemed proprietary (as is currently done) seems to work well.

    It seems a messy proposition to put the government in charge of determining which industries are "of value" to people and which aren't. It'd probably result in lots of pork (remember, thanks to politicians courting the votes of the large Portuguese-American community in southern Massachusetts, Americans of Portuguese descent are today considered minorities) and arbitrary, messy definitions.

    Maybe the typical LV handbag doesn't do much for scientific progress, but I wouldn't say that fashion as an industry is entirely incapable of producing any meaningful innovations ... and I wouldn't take the bet that it isn't by denying it the right to intellectual property!

Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New York City Books
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 172
    Last Post: October 6th, 2015, 12:41 AM
  2. Should New York State and City Split?
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: January 8th, 2010, 10:48 AM
  3. New York City Burgers
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: December 8th, 2008, 10:20 AM
  4. Christmas Trees of New York City
    By noharmony in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: November 10th, 2006, 04:08 AM
  5. New York City Photos - 2003 Calendar
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 13th, 2003, 06:26 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software