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Thread: Hudson Rail Tunnel - Access to the Regionís Core (ARC)

  1. #31

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    Extend NJT tracks 1-5 to the lower level of GCT. That way NJT can serve both stations with the same train.

  2. #32
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    George Haikalis, chairman of the Regional Rail Working Group and a resident of Greenwich Village. He said that "constructing a deep cavern station under Macy's" would pose "significant risks to passengers."
    I would like to know what the "risks" are.

    Also, who is to say focusing everything at the same station is a GOOD idea? Is GCS big enough to handle a significant increase?

    I think they should plan for any possible extensions in the future and make the construction easily adaptable for them, but leave them out for now.

    One thing though. The only thing I would say would be necessary would be a convenient connection to NYC subways. Are we talking about a 6 flight climb to the A+E?

  3. #33

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    March 17, 2006
    Regional Transit Council Puts Hudson Tunnel on List
    By PATRICK McGEEHAN

    A group of New York political leaders and transportation officials threw their support yesterday behind a project that would start in New Jersey ó a $6 billion rail tunnel under the Hudson River.

    The group, known as the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council, voted to add the proposed tunnel to its list of major projects that need to be built during the next 25 years. Projects must be on the list, known as the regional transportation plan, to qualify for federal funds.

    The council, whose members represent city and state agencies and five suburban New York counties, published a regional plan last year that did not include the trans-Hudson tunnel. But at its annual meeting yesterday, the council amended the plan to add the tunnel, a top priority of officials in New Jersey, over the objections of some who prefer different configurations for the project.

    The vote occurred just minutes after the council's co-chairmen announced that its members had settled on some shared goals and would work in concert to identify transportation projects that would meet them. This newfound spirit of cooperation will help in obtaining more federal financing for improvements in the region, said Thomas R. Suozzi, the Nassau County executive, who completed a one-year term yesterday as a council co-chairman.

    "It's important that we, as a region, try to establish a vision that will target growth" and contain suburban sprawl, said Mr. Suozzi, a Democrat who is running for governor of New York. He added that the council had recognized in the past year that "working together, we'll be much more effective than we have been working separately."

    The council is responsible for tracking long-term transportation projects that will require financing from the federal government. In the past, it had no mechanism for measuring the relative benefits of big projects and prioritizing them. As a result, local officials lobbied against one another for money in Washington, pitting bridges against tunnels against subway lines.

    Now, the council is developing a process for gauging a project's importance by certain criteria, including its potential benefits to the regional economy, environment and quality of life, said Thomas J. Madison Jr., commissioner of the New York State Department of Transportation. Mr. Madison is a co-chairman of the council, along with Iris Weinshall, the transportation commissioner of New York City, who succeeded Mr. Suozzi yesterday.

    Other members represent Putnam, Rockland, Suffolk and Westchester Counties.

    Mr. Madison said that the council's direction had been uncertain beyond lining up financing for two big projects: a subway under Second Avenue in Manhattan and a connection for the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal under the East River.

    All told, the council has identified $70 billion in needed but unfinanced projects, including the possible replacement of the Tappan Zee Bridge, Mr. Madison said. With the prospect of declining amounts of money from Washington, Gov. George E. Pataki is pushing for legislation in Albany that would allow the state to enter partnerships with private companies to build or operate highways, bridges or other public assets.

    Mr. Madison said: "This is something we need to look at. Financing is going to be an incredibly important part of our discussions in the future."

    On that score, adding the trans-Hudson rail tunnel ó two single-track tubes ó to the regional plan was painless. The plan was amended to include the tunnel, which would stretch from northern New Jersey to a terminal deep under West 34th Street in Manhattan, on the premise that its financing would come from New Jersey or Washington.

    New Jersey Transit, the project's sponsor, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have pledged to find the money from state and federal sources. George D. Warrington, New Jersey Transit's executive director and a council member, said yesterday that he was "deeply grateful" for the council's action.

    The approval came despite objections from some transportation advocates who argued that burying New Jersey Transit and Long Island Rail Road platforms in "deep caverns" more than 100 feet below street level, as has been proposed, would be too expensive and dangerous.

    George Haikalis, who said he was the president of the Institute for Rational Urban Mobility, called for connecting the tracks through the proposed new tunnel to Pennsylvania Station and on to Grand Central Terminal. That plan would cost less, attract more commuters and save travel time, he said, but it has been rejected because it would require unprecedented cooperation among regional transportation officials.

    Mr. Suozzi asked the council's staff to prepare a rebuttal to the criticism.

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  4. #34
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    George Haikalis, who said he was the president of the Institute for Rational Urban Mobility, called for connecting the tracks through the proposed new tunnel to Pennsylvania Station and on to Grand Central Terminal. That plan would cost less, attract more commuters and save travel time, he said, but it has been rejected because it would require unprecedented cooperation among regional transportation officials.
    The obvious best result is impossible because it will take too much cooperation. NY politicians and their appointments are almost completely useless.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyO
    The obvious best result is impossible because it will take too much cooperation. NY politicians and their appointments are almost completely useless.
    That's why you need a Robert Moses.

    Cooperation, shmooperation.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by injcsince81
    That's why you need a Robert Moses.

    Cooperation, shmooperation.
    An even better paragon might be Baron Haussmann. When he evicted folks from their premises, he made them just as unhappy as did Moses. The difference: in hindsight, there's little fault to be found in Haussmann's product (essentially today's Paris), while Moses' legacy seems something of a mixed bag. If he'd built the Lower Manhattan Expressway his reputation would likely be lower.

    Haussmann's Paris turned out incredibly well. If you were inclined to argue that some ends justify the means, Haussmann's Paris could be Exhibit A.

  7. #37
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Question Why So Long??

    Corzine buys the ticket for Trans-Hudson rail tunnel in 2009

    Thursday, May 11, 2006
    BY DUNSTAN McNICHOL
    Star-Ledger Staff

    Promising to help North Jersey commuters make a great escape from mounting congestion, Gov. Jon Corzine and top members of his administration said yesterday groundbreaking for construction of a railroad tunnel linking New Jersey and Manhattan will happen in 2009.

    "For a lot of personal reasons, in 2009 there will be a shovel in the ground that year," said Corzine, who could be seeking re-election that year, too. "I am absolutely committed to that project, and it will happen."

    Plans for the $6 billion Trans- Hudson Express (THE) tunnel dominated the annual Governor's Transportation Conference in Trenton, with top officials from New Jersey Transit, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey and the state Department of Transportation laying out funding schedules and timetables for the project.

    Philip K. Beachem, president of the highway contractor's lobbying group Alliance for Action, kicked off the seminar by unveiling a bi- state campaign to promote the project with the New York Building Conference.

    Preliminary studies already are under way, and George Warrington, executive director of New Jersey Transit, said his agency is scheduled to hire an engineer in July to lay out the full alignment of the tunnel and its approaches through the Meadowlands, Palisades and under the Hudson River. By the end of the year, he said, the agency plans to seek a construction manager.

    "We are very, very committed to delivering this project to the people of New Jersey over the next decade," he said. "It is the most important project in 100 years."

    Anthony Coscia, chairman of the Port Authority, added his agency's endorsement, saying construction of the tunnel was as important to the current generation as the building of the Lincoln Tunnel and George Washington Bridges were earlier.

    "I'm committed to the Port Authority making a multibillion-dollar investment into that project," he said. "That's a project that clearly people years from now will look back and say it was the turning point in creating a regional economy."

    Warrington said the current two tracks under the Hudson carry a maximum of 23 trains per hour. He said the state already has taken steps to expand the existing tun nel's carrying capacity by adding cars to trains, improving signaling, and preparing to introduce double- decker cars later this year.

    "We're all done squeezing; there's simply nothing left to wring out," he said. "We must build a tunnel and we must build it now."

    Dunstan McNichol covers state government issues. He may be reached at dmcnichol@starled ger.com or (609) 989-0341.

  8. #38
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    With Corzine and Spitzer both on the same page about this project, the prospects for it look good. And that's good news, because this is one of the most important projects for the future of New York City.

    Over the next 35 years, the U.S. population is expected to grow by about 93 million. How many of them live and work in the New York metro region depend on our ability to build enough infrastructure capacity to move them around. This project will play a major role in ensuring that the region's historic radial commuting patterns remain viable.

  9. #39

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    I know this is off topic but will we ever seen a new tunnel like the Lincoln or Holland? The traffic in these tunnels at time is unbearable!

  10. #40
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    No. There isn't enough street capacity to absorb more traffic volume. If you build a new tunnel, there would be gridlock in the city.

  11. #41
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    What is clearly needed is a tunnel that takes auto traffic directly from NJ > Brooklyn / Queens, bypassing Manhattan altogether.

    This should be one of the major 21st Century projects for the metro area.

  12. #42

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    From http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...t=2959&page=12:

    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc
    How about the Under-Manhattan Expressway? New Jersey to Queens with no Manhattan access or exits. Shorter than many tunnels in the Alps.
    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    God Bless you if you can make THIS happen
    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    What is clearly needed is a tunnel that takes auto traffic directly from NJ > Brooklyn / Queens, bypassing Manhattan altogether.
    This should be one of the major 21st Century projects for the metro area.
    Lol, and God bless you too, lofter1. Good to have you in the Pie-in-the-Sky Society.

    I guess we're both charter members.

    .
    Last edited by ablarc; May 11th, 2006 at 08:09 PM.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    What is clearly needed is a tunnel that takes auto traffic directly from NJ > Brooklyn / Queens, bypassing Manhattan altogether.

    This should be one of the major 21st Century projects for the metro area.
    And from LI for CT.

  14. #44
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    LI would not want that.

    Why would North Fork want to have people able to get to them directly from CT in 30 minutes?

    They like their isolation (Although I too agree that access would be nice).

  15. #45

    Default Trans-Hudson Express Tunnel

    AM New York
    May 15, 2006

    Senators push for new tunnel between NJ and NYC

    The Associated Press

    Two U.S. senators are joining the governor of New Jersey to push for a new tunnel under the Hudson River to increase train traffic into Manhattan.

    U.S. Sens. Charles E. Schumer of New York and Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey were to hold a news conference Monday at Penn Station to ask that federal approval be sped up for the first stage of engineering on the proposed Trans-Hudson Express Tunnel.

    The $6 billion "THE Tunnel" would be used for additional trains from New Jersey into Manhattan.

    New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine last week said nearly $500 million would be used for the tunnel, which advocates say would double rail capacity between two states over the next two decades.

    Also this month, the U.S. senators from the two states wrote to U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta urging financial backing for the project.

    As proposed, the tunnel would begin in North Bergen and continue under Union City and Weehawken, extending to a new station under 34th Street in Manhattan between Sixth and Eighth avenues.

    Copyright 2006 AM New York

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