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Thread: Hudson Rail Tunnel - Access to the Regionís Core (ARC)

  1. #61
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation Important component!

    Topic: Kearny-Secaucus rail bridge

    Wednesday, January 17, 2007

    The Federal Railroad Administration, Amtrak and NJ Transit will hold a public meeting today from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Newark Public Library, Centennial Hall, 2nd Floor, 5 Washington St., Newark.

    The environmental, economic and social impacts of the proposed Portal Bridge Capacity Enhancement Project will be discussed. The bridge spans the Hackensack River between Kearny and Secaucus and is an important link in the Northeast Corridor System.

    Members of the public can register to speak and a brief presentation will be given from 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.

    For more information, call (917) 339-9488 for information or visit www.portalbridgenec.com.

    COTTON DELO

  2. #62
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Big Stepping Stone!

    Feds approve next step for Trans-Hudson tunnel

    1/19/2007, 7:25 p.m. ET
    By JANET FRANKSTON LORIN
    The Associated Press

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) ó A plan to build a $7 billion rail tunnel between New York and New Jersey has cleared a regulatory hurdle, with federal officials giving initial approval to the project's effects on the environment.

    The two-track tunnel, a massive project discussed for more than a decade, would double commuter rail capacity between the two states. Construction could begin as soon as 2009 and be complete by 2015.

    "This is a critical step toward getting a shovel in the ground in 2009," said New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine. "This project is important not only for transit capacity and continued economic growth, but it will provide crucial redundancy that will enhance rail security."

    The Federal Transit Administration approved the draft environmental impact statement on Thursday and notified New Jersey on Friday afternoon, said Kris Kolluri, New Jersey's transportation commissioner. That step moves the project closer to receiving approval for construction money.

    "It's a major milestone," he said. "It's a significant recognition by the federal government that this is an important project for the region and for the country."

    The approval allows the two states to begin scheduling public hearings. The next step would be final approval of the environmental impact statement.

    After a federal decision expected next year, the states would be able to begin negotiating how much cash the federal government would kick in.

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has already committed up to $2 billion for the project; New Jersey has kicked in an additional $500 million.

    New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer said the project provides regional benefits and is "one of the key bi-state initiatives that I support."

    New Jersey officials hope the federal government will pay half of the cost.

    The project already has some heavy hitters behind it, most notably the four U.S. senators from the two states, and their two governors.

    "It will add needed capacity for commuters, reduce the congestion on our highways and improve our environment," said U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J.

    The new tunnel would double to four tracks the routes between the states, giving NJ Transit flexibility when Amtrak trains slow traffic. Amtrak owns, operates and maintains the Northeast Corridor line into Penn Station, so its trains are given priority over the local transit agency.

    In addition to getting people in and out of Manhattan quickly, it would give commuters in New York's Rockland and Orange counties a direct route into New York without transferring.

  3. #63

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    I hope they atleast gave a thought to other possibilities, like extending to downtown. For the money being spent on a new tunnel and an entire new lower level at Penn Station, I think they might as well go to new territory. Branch off east of Newark, run under Jersey City, and then to downtown.

  4. #64
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
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    What's up with that "environmental impact" stuff? They're planning a tunnel. What could possibly be the impact of removing dirt from dirt? Maybe the dirt and rocks are too dirty?

    Seriously, what gives? We built the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, and quite a few rail tunnels around NYC, all without an EIS. Life went on.

  5. #65

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    Gotta keep the report-writers employed.

  6. #66

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    Where is the dirt going?
    What underground waterways will be cut off?
    By what means will the tunnel be ventilated?
    What is the impact of entrance and exit construction?

    I don't know if you realize this but the ventilation towers in tunnels carry concentrated carcinogenic fumes that can't be near an inhabited area. They also release these toxins in a small area, making their impact larger. A lot of sediment is also kicked up during construction impacting water quality.

    All of the NYC tunnels were designed long before World War II, so I don't think "the environment" was even a field of study back then.

  7. #67
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    The project will also have regional impacts on development and travel patterns. For example, it will help the Midtown CBD continue to grow.

    If the project doesn't have large regional impacts, then why build it at all?

    Since 1970, all government decisions that have an impact on the natural or human environment -- broadly defined -- must assess the impacts and provide an opportunity for public input before they move forward. Yes, these reports are expensive and time-consuming, but they are also ensure that the public is informed of the scope and impacts of major policy decisions before it is too late. It is the price of democracy.

    To read further...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...tal_Policy_Act

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmg View Post
    The project will also have regional impacts on development and travel patterns. For example, it will help the Midtown CBD continue to grow.

    If the project doesn't have large regional impacts, then why build it at all?

    Since 1970, all government decisions that have an impact on the natural or human environment -- broadly defined -- must assess the impacts and provide an opportunity for public input before they move forward. Yes, these reports are expensive and time-consuming, but they are also ensure that the public is informed of the scope and impacts of major policy decisions before it is too late. It is the price of democracy.

    To read further...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...tal_Policy_Act
    Are you saying that the tunnel is not a good idea?

  9. #69
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    no need to debate if its worth building, contract has been signed by joint venture that will build it

  10. #70
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    Feds to give $16M for Hudson tunnel

    Thursday, March 1, 2007
    AP

    NEWARK -- The federal government will fund an initial $16 million in preliminary engineering costs for a $7.5 billion tunnel that would connect New York and New Jersey under the Hudson River, New Jersey's two U.S. senators announced Wednesday.

    The two-track tunnel, a massive project discussed for more than a decade, would double commuter rail capacity between the two states. Construction could begin as soon as 2009 and be complete by 2016.

    The funding share among the states, the federal government and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has yet to be determined. In general, new mass-transit projects receive about 50 percent in federal matching funds, said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for New Jersey Transit.

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has already committed up to $2 billion for the project; New Jersey has kicked in an additional $500 million.

    The public will have a chance to comment on the project at a series of public hearings on March 13 in Newark, March 14 in North Bergen and March 27 in New York.

  11. #71
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation Public Hearings!

    NJ TRANSIT ANNOUNCES HEARINGS ON ACCESS TO THE REGION’S CORE STUDY
    Public invited to comment on Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    March 5, 2007
    NJT-07-018
    Contact: Penny Bassett Hackett or Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

    NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT will conduct the first of several public hearing and information sessions Tuesday, March 13, to give the public an opportunity to learn about the findings of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Access to the Region’s Core (ARC) study—which features a new trans-Hudson tunnel as its centerpiece—as well as ask questions and offer comments.

    Information regarding the ARC DEIS, and accompanying documents, is available on the project website: www.accesstotheregionscore.com.

    The hearings will be conducted in an open house format and will include informational displays and presentations. Members of the public may register in advance to speak at the hearings by calling (877) ARC-0999.

    To ensure an inclusive public comment process, NJ TRANSIT has scheduled three public hearings—each with a daytime and evening session—as well as two information sessions at locations in New Jersey and New York from March 13 through March 27.


    Public hearing schedule

    Public hearings will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. as follows:

    Tuesday, March 13 - North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority, One Newark Center (17th Floor), Raymond Boulevard, Newark, NJ

    Wednesday, March 14 - Schuetzen Park (Main Ballroom), 3167 Kennedy Boulevard, North Bergen, NJ

    Tuesday, March 27 - Fashion Institute of Technology (Great Hall), 27th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues, Manhattan, NY



    Additional information sessions

    In addition to the scheduled public hearings, NJ TRANSIT will hold two “informational sessions” in Rockland and Orange counties, New York, to receive comment from members of the public who are unable to attend one of the three public hearings. As a practical matter, public hearings and information sessions will be conducted in a similar manner, except that only private testimony will be accepted at the information sessions.

    NJ TRANSIT informational sessions will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. as follows:

    Tuesday, March 20 - Palisades Center Mall (4th Floor Community Room), 1000 Palisades Center Drive, West Nyack, NY

    Thursday, March 22 - Orange County Government Center (Legislative Chambers), 255 Main Street, Goshen, NY


    Members of the public also may submit comments concerning ARC DEIS findings through April 10, 2007 via email to deis@accesstotheregionscore.com or via standard mail delivery to: Tom Schulze, NJ TRANSIT ARC Project Director, One Penn Plaza East, 4th Floor, Newark, NJ 07105.


    About Access to the Region’s Core

    The Access to the Region’s Core (ARC) program includes two new single-track railroad tunnels between New Jersey and New York, additional station capacity under 34th Street in Manhattan, and signal and track improvements along and adjacent to the Northeast Corridor.

    The project will allow for the introduction of “one-seat” rail service to New York on the Main, Bergen County, Pascack Valley and Raritan Valley lines, the Montclair-Boonton Line west of Montclair, North Jersey Coast Line south to Bay Head, as well as the Morristown Line west of Dover. It will also create the capacity for future rail extensions.

    The project includes expanded station capacity north of New York Penn Station under 34th Street, with underground connections to several New York City subway lines (A, B, C, D, E, F, N, Q, R, V, W, 1, 2, 3) and PATH trains.


    About the DEIS

    The Access to the Region’s Core Draft Environmental Impact Statement builds on findings of a Major Investment Study (MIS) conducted by NJ TRANSIT, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Completed in April 2003, the MIS identified and evaluated alternatives to provide additional trans-Hudson passenger access.

    The findings of the MIS serve as the foundation for the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), a requirement of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 that ensures a full and open evaluation of environmental issues and alternatives for major transportation projects applying for federal funding. The DEIS compiles an assessment of the proposed project’s effects on social, economic and environmental conditions.

    The ARC DEIS is sponsored by NJ TRANSIT in partnership with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

  12. #72
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Cool Can you dig it? YEA...Can you dig it? YEA...Caann Yoouu Diig It? YEEAAA!!!

    New train tunnel to NYC? Most can dig idea

    Thursday, March 15, 2007
    By ALI WINSTON
    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

    NORTH BERGEN - A small but supportive crowd turned out yesterday for an afternoon hearing at Scheutzen Park for a massive $6.3 billion commuter rail project that includes a new tunnel under the Hudson River, a new train station at 34th street in New York City, and a new rail yard in Kearny.

    Held the day after another hearing in Newark - a final one is scheduled for Tuesday in New York - the hearing gave residents an opportunity to voice their opinions about a public works project that proponents say would be a boon to commuters, local infrastructure, and the environment.

    The goal of the NJ Transit project - the Trans-Hudson Express Tunnel - is to increase ridership by adding two tracks that would run to a new station at 34th Street between Sixth and Eighth avenues in Manhattan.

    In addition, modifications to the Frank R. Lautenberg Secaucus Junction Station would allow NJ Transit riders on the North Jersey Coast, Montclair-Boonton, Raritan Valley, Pascack Valley, and the Main and Bergen County lines to travel directly to New York City.

    "It's a terrific idea, I hope the project goes ahead," said Steve Hirschman, of Teaneck, who attended yesterday's hearing.

    A regular rider on the Pascack Valley line, Hirschman complained about the extra 15 minutes added to his commute because of the transfer in Secaucus and of train delays caused by congestion in the existing tunnel.

    "It's a win-win situation," he said.

    The project, slated to begin in 2009 with service beginning in 2016, has been lauded by politicians, environmentalists, and unions.

    U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, for whom the Secaucus station is named, and Rep. Albio Sires, D-West New York, both testified in support at Tuesday's hearing in Newark. The Sierra Club, the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission, and the Hudson County Building and Construction Trades Council have all spoken in favor of the project.

    The project has received $2.5 billion in funding from the state and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and would increase peak morning service to Manhattan from 23 to 48 trains per hour, according to the environmental impact report.

  13. #73

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    Yeah, that modification is a huge loop that will have trains running through the station twice and render the BRAND NEW transfer station completely useless

  14. #74
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    I wonder what will become of the station? I know JC wants to extend the lightrail over the 6th St. Embankment and through the Bergen Arches to Secaucus Junction it goes. I hope that doesn't affect the route.

  15. #75

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    I still think that the loop is a foolish waste of money. The tunnels and new lower level not so much, because perhaps now with NJT using the new tunnels and new lower level, there can be a boost in Amtrak as well as NJT service, possibly even Metro North from the Hudson Line.

    However, I'd rather see all the efforts and money(including that being used for the tunnel/new lower level) being used to send trains to downtown. It would line up perfectly with the West of Hudson lines(Pascack Valley, Bergen, Main, Port Jervis), and would be easily accesible by all the other lines currently running to Hoboken.

    It'd be 3 terminals(which is essentially what this project is doing), but in 3 different places, versus 3 terminals in 2 places. This line would actually run via the Bergen Arches

    As far as HBLR is concerned, I believe that was ONE of multiple proposals. I think most of the future work is at the southern end of the line in Bayonne. I personally would like to see the line run across the bay to Newark. I don't see much of a use for a line from Secaucus since you can already bet from Secaucus to Hoboken. Also, if you're destination is Jersey City, you transfer in Hoboken or Newark to PATH(or also HBLR in Hoboken).

    I guess my reasoning against HBLR via the Bergen Arches is becuase I think the better use would be another commuter rail line, this one to downtown with a stop in Jersey City. Over the years, they've tried to shove all the trains from multiple waterfront terminals into just 2(Hoboken and Penn). It's just not going to work.

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