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Thread: Brooklyn Bridge

  1. #31

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    running on the bridge at night is the best. The view is amazing.

  2. #32
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    WILL SMITH 'ATTACKS' NEW YORK

    nypost.com
    By TOM LIDDY and JEREMY OLSHAN
    January 23, 2007

    Don't be alarmed by the fleet of Black Hawk helicopters and military ships converging on the Brooklyn Bridge tonight - it's only the new Will Smith movie, police said yesterday.

    For the next eight days, these mock military vehicles and more than a thousand extras will shoot an evacuation scene for the next Big Willie blockbuster, "I am Legend."

    The post-apocalyptic sci-fi flick is due out this December.

    Filming will start at 4 p.m. and is expected to wrap up weekdays at 10 p.m., police said.

    Despite the rush-hour start time, city transportation officials promise the movie shoot will not turn evening commutes over the next week into a horror show.

    All the action will happen at Dover Street under the bridge, officials said.
    No shooting will take place on the Brooklyn Bridge itself and no approach lanes will be affected.

    But even though the flow of traffic will not be impeded by the set, gawking and rubbernecking are certain to slow things down, officials said.

    Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.

  3. #33
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    But even though the flow of traffic will not be impeded by the set, gawking and rubbernecking are certain to slow things down, officials said.
    New Yorkers are the worst when it come to rubbernecking.

    Just a vehicle stopped on the side of a road is enough to slow traffic down because people want to see what's going on, so imagine what this film shoot will do.

  4. #34

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    Here's a picture taken from the bridge of the Manhattan Bridge. The Empire State Building is massive.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #35

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    very nice shot

    one shot on night

  6. #36
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Brooklyn Bridge to get a little coffee color

    APRIL 25 - MAY 1
    Downtown Express


    The Brooklyn Bridge is getting a $300 million facelift.

    The 1883 landmarked suspension bridge needs a variety of cosmetic and safety fixes. The city Department of Transportation will do the work on nights and some weekends between 2009 and 2014, representatives told the Community Board 1 Landmarks Committee last month.

    “We want to build the structure and not come back again,” said Walter Kulczycki, the project engineer. “We’ll do it one time and do it right.”
    The pavement on the bridge’s ramps is old and cracked, with potholes, Kulzcycki said. Salt and rain have deteriorated the arches.

    The D.O.T. will reconstruct the pavement on the ramps leading to the bridge and rehabilitate the bridge’s supports to strengthen them. The arch blocks need to be reinforced so they are earthquake resistant.

    The D.O.T. will widen the ramp that leads from the southbound FDR Dr. onto the Brooklyn Bridge. The ramp is currently one lane, but there is enough room to create two lanes, which will ease the traffic flow, Kulczycki said.

    On the Brooklyn side, the D.O.T. will also widen the ramp leading off the bridge onto Cadman Plaza West and Old Fulton St.

    The D.O.T. plans to paint the entire bridge, restoring its original light coffee beige color. The painting will be done from two barges starting from the middle of the East River and movin
    g toward opposite shores. The entire process will take two years.
    Along the bridge’s roadway, the D.O.T. will add steel safety barriers to prevent cars from crashing through the bridge’s granite balustrades and landing in the East River. The steel tubes, which are only visible to people crossing the bridge, were the most controversial feature of the project at the C.B. 1 meeting.

    “They’re ugly,” said Bruce Ehrmann, co-chairperson of the Landmarks Committee. “Part of the reason to keep landmarks is to enjoy them. There’s no reason to preserve it if you can’t enjoy it.”

    Project architect Jaime Vasquez agreed that the barriers are not attractive, but said they were necessary.

    Kulczycki added that the D.O.T.’s hands are tied — since the project receives federal funding, the D.O.T. is required to install the barriers.

    The D.O.T. will return to C.B. 1 later this year to explain the construction project in more detail.

    --Julie Shapiro

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_26...lynbridge.html
    © 2008 Community Media, LLC

  7. #37

    Default Brooklyn Bridge at 125

    From The New York Daily News.

    Slide show HERE



    © Copyright 2008 NYDailyNews.com.

  8. #38

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    Very nice Brian. Thanks for sharing that.

  9. #39

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    May 21, 2008, 5:36 pm

    This Way to Brooklyn, This Way

    By Ann Farmer


    Just in time for the 125th anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge, signs were unveiled on the pedestrian walkway welcoming people to Brooklyn and its neighborhoods. (Photo: Christian Hansen for The New York Times)

    The Brooklyn borough president, Marty Markowitz, kicked off the Brooklyn Bridge’s 125th anniversary celebration this afternoon by crooning “Happy Birthday” before joining other officials in unveiling the Brooklyn Bridge Pedestrian Walkway Project. This upgrade to its pedestrian walkway on the Brooklyn side includes new pedestrian signs and a permanent public-art lighting installation to welcome pedestrians exiting the bridge through the stairwell leading into Dumbo.

    A new large sign on the pedestrian walkway says, “Welcome to Brooklyn,” and embedded into the walkway are the names of various Brooklyn neighborhoods, along with the walking distance to those neighborhoods (in both feet and meters).

    “For many years, no one knew where Dumbo was,” said Mr. Markowitz, standing in front of the stairwell at Prospect and Washington Streets that leads up to the pedestrian walkway to the bridge, as tourists coming down the steps during the commemoration stopped to examine the new neighborhood map at the bottom. “It was a comedy of errors as tourists searched for the entrance to the most famous bridge on the planet.”

    The project was instigated by the Dumbo Improvement District, whose executive director, Tucker Reed, pushed for it.

    Pointing out how the new sidewalk lighting, by Tillett Lighting Design and KT3D, visually guides people to the stairwell, Mr. Markowitz added, “We’ve made it much easier for the world’s tourists.”

    Adam Tanski of Emphasis Design, which designed the new signs, explained that the project was kicked off two years ago with a study that indicated only a small percentage of pedestrians crossing the bridge penetrated Brooklyn. “The normal pedestrian who came down the stairs was lost and confused and wanted to know where to find the closest subway to Manhattan,” he said.

    In fact, the team that installed the project had to take time out each day to play tour guide. Mike Zysk, the director of field operations for Unicorn Construction, said that while his team installed the project, hundreds of people coming down the stairs stopped to ask where the E train was or where they could get a bite to eat. “They’d ask what we were doing,” Mr. Zysk said. “We’d say, ‘Funny you should ask, we’re working the This Way project.’ “

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...ght-under-you/

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  10. #40
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    Thumbs up

    I saw the fireworks and light show / illumination of the Bridge tonight for its 125th Anniversary.

    Spectacular!

  11. #41

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    Lucky you. I wish I could have been there to see it.

    If you hear of any video coverage or photographs, please let us know.

  12. #42

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    BR, I just found this.

    May 22, 2008, 10:56 pm

    Celebrating an Engineering Marvel, Born in Tragedy

    By Jennifer 8. Lee


    The 125th anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge is being marked with a series of celebrations, starting with a concert and lighting ceremony Thursday night. (Photo: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times) Slide Show

    The Brooklyn Bridge: a marvel of engineering, or a death trap? Both, within the first week of its opening.

    The opening of the Brooklyn Bridge [pdf] on May 24, 1883, was a joyous occasion with “two great cities united.” That 125th anniversary is being marked with a series of celebrations over the holiday weekend. But few remember that the bridge’s public debut was marred days later by a stampede [pdf] in which a dozen people were crushed to death, and 35 others injured. The May 30 mayhem was exacerbated by a false rumor that the bridge was going to collapse.

    The traffic that surged onto the Brooklyn bridge as soon as it opened was overwhelming and dominated by pedestrians who were charged one cent to pass. There was room for 15,000 people on the footpaths at any one time (though overcrowding sometimes drove it to as high as 20,000).

    On the second day, there was “a crush of foot passengers from 11 o’clock in the morning to 7 o’clock at night.” The pedestrians “collected at the entrance, compressed themselves into a funnel about 15 feet in width and then ran the gantlet, one by one, of the tolltakers.”

    Until then, to cross the river, people had to take the ferry.

    With subways now, it is rare to see such vast crowds on foot on the bridge, except in emergencies like Sept. 11 and blackouts.

    The dense flow of people over the bridge made it fertile ground for pickpockets (newspaper accounts talk about a lot of men discovering that they were missing watches) and other hazards. Six days after the opening, the deadly stampede occurred.

    According to the most commonly accepted account, one cited by The New-York Times, the stampede started when a woman fell down the wooden steps on the Manhattan side, and another woman screamed (perhaps because she saw the woman being dragged by a police office officer who had sprung to her aid)

    But another version of the events, cited by The New York Tribune, and considered more credible by The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, starts with a German man descending the steps when a pickpocket tried to steal his watch. His wife screamed, and the thief’s accomplices started yelling that the bridge was going to collapse, leading to a rumor-induced panic.

    Agonizing!” read the lead headine from The Eagle, which devoted an extra to the panic. It also highlighted “The Stairway that Led to Death.”
    As The Times described at the time [pdf]:
    Those on the promenade above the stairway,knowing nothing of the fearful crush on the steps, surged ahead with irresistible force, and in a moment the whole stairway was packed with dead and dying men, women and children, piled upon another in a writhing, struggling mass. Cries, shrieks, yells, and groans filled the air at the stairway, while those on the promenade above yelled and shouted as they were pushed forward and rolled and tumbled over the poor unfortunates who were being crushed and trampled to death beneath them.
    The situation was made worse by “a gang of New York toughs” who formed a dense line by putting their arms on each other’s shoulders and charged.

    The police officers on duty didn’t have the ability to shut off the bridge on the other side. So for some time, the crowd kept pouring onto the bridge even as people were getting crushed on the other end. Officers were eventually stationed in the middle of the bridge to turn people back.

    To relieve the strain of people, a bridge employee found a chisel and a hammer nearby and hammered at iron bolts and nuts until he broke away a section of the iron fence to relieve the crush. Also wood planks were laid so people could walk over the fence.

    The Times reported the injuries in graphic detail [pdf]:
    The first rescuers to reach the spot found the dead and dying wedged together in the narrow space as if they had fastened in a vise. So tightly were they packed and squeezed that from dozens of persons blood was oozing from ears and noses. The bodies were piled four or five deep at the foot of the stairway and most of those at the bottom were women.
    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle wrote, “The sight was one that was never equaled for horror.” The dead were laid in a row, their faces covered with hats or another article of clothing.

    After the bodies and the crowds were cleared, all that was left was bloodstains on the steps, mens and women’s hats, umbrellas and parasols, and a thousand steel pens lost by a peddler. But the clean-up was relatively speedy. As the Times described at the time [pdf]:
    An hour after the disaster the only evidence that anything unusual had occurred at the stairway was the opening in the iron railing where a section of the latter was torn away in order that bodies might be more quickly taken from the mass in the stairway.
    Among the proposals to advert future disasters: tripling the police force on the bridge, accelerating the plans for a telephone connection from one end of the bridge to another, and removing the stairs in favor of an inclined plane.

    And of course, lawsuits were filed against the bridge trustees.

    Anniversary Events

    The Brooklyn Bridge lights will be turned on from 9 to 11 p.m. each night through Memorial Day. The celebrations and observances include lectures, dances, performances, a film series presented at the foot of the bridge, information tents, guided tours, and more. [Complete Schedule, NYCVisit.com.]

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...l?ref=nyregion

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  13. #43

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    City Throws Bash For Brooklyn Bridge's 125th Birthday

    by Gillian Reagan | May 22, 2008


    Getty Images
    Newspaper illustration of the celebration at the grand opening of the bridge, May 24, 1883.

    Break out the bubbly! The Brooklyn Bridge is way way way over the hill at 125 this year and New York is celebrating with several birthday bashes this weekend including concerts, movie nights, fireworks, dancing and ... uh mini-golf.

    The only requisite birthday event missing is karaoke but maybe the Brooklyn Philharmonic and Broadway master Marvin Hamlisch can get the crowd crooning with a hearty rendition of "One" from A Chorus Line.
    Starting at 7:45 p.m. tonight, at the Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, the Philharmonic and Mr. Hamlisch will kick off the celebration tonight with a concert followed by fireworks.

    The Bridge will light up the night tonight and every night from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. through Memorial Day after a ceremony.

    You can also take a peek into artist Paul St. George's Telectroscope that allows you to see all the way to London! More information and events from NYCVisit.com follows here:
    Friday, May 23
    Brooklyn Bridge Film Series: Pack a picnic dinner and enjoy the sunset at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge as DJs spin tunes. Stick around for an open-air showing of Walt Disney Pictures’ Enchanted (2007; rated PG), a modern-day fairy tale set in Manhattan. It will be preceded by two short historic films—Panorama from the Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1903) and Manhatta (1921). Music begins at 6pm; film starts at 8:30pm. This event is free—along with the popcorn. (Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, enter at Main Street, Brooklyn)
    To experience New York City film from inside the theater, head to Tribeca Cinemas to catch Mo’ Better Blues (1990; rated R) from Brooklyn’s own Spike Lee, starring Denzel Washington as a Brooklyn-born jazz trumpeter. Arrive early as seating is limited. Doors open at 6:30pm; film begins at 7pm. Free. (54 Varick Street at Laight Street, Manhattan)

    Brooklyn Bridge Information Tents: The American Society of Civil Engineers and the Roebling Chapter of the Society for Industrial Archeology will offer guided tours of the Bridge through Sunday, 10am–5pm. Free. (Brooklyn Bridge by Manhattan and Brooklyn-side arches)


    Saturday, May 24
    Brooklyn Bridge Film Series: Did you know the Brooklyn Bridge was once called the East River Bridge? Learn all sorts of information about the landmark from Brooklyn Bridge (1981), a documentary directed by Ken Burns. Seating is limited at this event presented by the Brooklyn Academy of Music. The film begins at 4:30pm; tickets available starting at 1:30pm. Free. (30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn)
    Enjoy the views from the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge and sing along to the musical It Happened in Brooklyn (1947), starring Frank Sinatra as a Brooklynite returning home from the war. The feature will be preceded by two short historic films—Panorama from the Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1903) and Manhatta (1921). DJs will begin spinning tunes at 6pm; film starts at 8:30pm. This event is free—along with the popcorn. (Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, enter at Main Street, Brooklyn)

    Lecture Series: In honor of the Bridge’s 125th birthday, the Brooklyn Historical Society will host of weekend of lectures and readings at their headquarters (128 Pierrepont Street at Clinton Street, Brooklyn, 718-222-4111) each hour from 1–4pm. Additional lectures will be held at Surrogates Court (31 Chambers Street, Room 209, Manhattan) from 1–3pm. Seating is limited at all readings. For a complete schedule, visit the Official Guide to the Brooklyn Bridge 125th Birthday Celebration. Free.

    Brooklyn Bridge Walking Tour: Ron Schweiger, the official historian for Brooklyn, will give a tour of the Brooklyn Bridge at 11am. Call 718-802-3846 for more information. Free. (Meet at Manhattan-side arch of the Brooklyn Bridge)

    Brooklyn Icons Mini-Golf: This mini-golf course features some of Brooklyn’s most famous sites, including the Brooklyn Bridge, Grand Army Plaza and the Brooklyn Cyclones’ baseball stadium, KeySpan Park. Golf clubs and balls are provided on-site. This event will be held Saturday and Sunday, 1–5pm. For more information, go to visitbrooklyn.org or call 718-802-3846. Free. (Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, enter on Main Street, Brooklyn)


    Sunday, May 25
    Tour de Brooklyn: For the fourth year in a row, 2,000 bicyclists will ride all around Brooklyn in this leisurely 18-mile bike tour. Participate or just cheer from the sidelines. For advance registration, go to tourdebrooklyn.org. Family friendly. Free.

    Brooklyn Bridge Walking Tours: At 11am, Ron Schweiger, the official historian for Brooklyn, will give a tour of the Brooklyn Bridge (meet at the Manhattan-side arch of Brooklyn Bridge). At 1pm and 4pm, Dave Fieder—aka “Dave the Bridge Man”—will also give tours of the landmark (meet at Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge). Call 718-802-3846 for more information. Free.

    Lecture Series: In honor of the Bridge’s 125th birthday, the Brooklyn Historical Society will host of weekend of lectures and readings at their headquarters (128 Pierrepont Street at Clinton Street, Brooklyn, 718-222-4111) each hour from 1–3pm. Additional lectures will be held at Surrogate's Court (31 Chambers Street, Room 209, Manhattan) from 1–4pm. Seating is limited at all readings. For a complete schedule, visit the Official Guide to the Brooklyn Bridge 125th Birthday Celebration. Free.

    Dance and Musical Performances: Various dance and music groups will celebrate the spirit of the Brooklyn Bridge with performances from 1–5pm. For a complete schedule of events, go to visitbrooklyn.org or visit the Official Guide to the Brooklyn Bridge 125th Birthday Celebration. All performances are free. (Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, enter at Main Street, Brooklyn)

    Additional Information
    For more cultural activities, visit our Calendar of Events, or go to nyc.gov or visitbrooklyn.org. For a complete schedule, check out the Official Guide to the Brooklyn Bridge 125th Birthday Celebration.



    http://www.observer.com/2008/city-th...125th-birthday

    © 2008 Observer Media Group,
    Last edited by brianac; May 23rd, 2008 at 07:25 AM.

  14. #44
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    I saw it too, it really was spectacular. Always love when the big boats and ships in the vicinity blow their horns after a fireworks show, and many in the crowd spontaneously broke out into 'Happy Birthday' to the Brooklyn Bridge. would be nice if the towers could be illuminated more often, those gothic arches aglow are amazing.

  15. #45

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    NYaK

    In two lines of text you have given a great idea of the atmosphere of the occasion and made me very envious of you all being there.

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