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Thread: Brooklyn Bridge

  1. #61

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    Took this one from the M9 bus, with minor editing in Picasa & major editing in, of all things, Paint.



  2. #62

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    Brooklyn Bridge to get face-lift thanks to Feds, says Bloomberg

    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Monday, March 30th 2009, 1:26 PM

    Antonelli/News Federal stiumlus money will fund a face-lift of the 125-year-old Brooklyn Bridge.


    New paint for the Brooklyn Bridge is on the list of projects that will get federal stimulus money.


    Mayor Michael Bloomberg and New York's senators are announcing the six infrastructure projects that will get the $261 million.

    The list includes a project to spruce up the Brooklyn Bridge with new paint and wider ramps leading off and on.

    A Staten Island ferry terminal will also get new traffic ramps.

    Two Bruckner Expressway bridges over the Bronx River will get a new protective coating. And the Greenpoint Avenue Bridge that connects Brooklyn and Queens will get a makeover.

    The mayor says the federal stimulus money is helping create jobs and is going toward projects that might have otherwise been cut.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/..._thanks_t.html

    © 2009 Daily News

  3. #63

    Default Brooklyn Bridge - Designed by John A. Redding

    Thanks very very much for the last picture of the Brooklyn Bridge posted.

  4. #64

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    Four-year Rehab of Brooklyn Bridge to Begin in December

    By Matt Dunning

    UPDATED Sep. 10


    A four-year rehabilitation of the Brooklyn Bridge could begin in as early as December, city transportation officials said earlier this week.

    The landmark 126-year-old bridge is in dire need of repair, according to the city’s Department of Transportation. Its concrete roadway is cracked and worn. Its approaches and off-ramps are far too narrow to accommodate the 145,000 vehicles using the bridge each day, and much of the metalwork on the bridge—the anchorages, joints and railings—needs to be replaced and painted.

    “If we don’t do something about it soon, it’s going to have some huge problems,” Rajendra Navalurkar, an engineer working on the project, told Community Board 1’s Seaport Committee during a Sept. 8 meeting. “It’s really a wide variety of work that needs to be done.”

    When the work begins, on Dec. 1, Navalurkar said, the DOT will shut down the Manhattan-bound lanes of the bridge at night (from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.) and on some weekends (from 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. on Saturdays and 9 a.m. on Sundays), diverting traffic over the Manhattan Bridge or through the Brooklyn-Battery tunnel. Traffic heading east over the bridge into Brooklyn will not be interrupted, and the pedestrian walkway will remain open during construction.

    The first phase of the project will see many of the approaches and off-ramps on both sides of the bridge widened to two lanes. Both concrete roadways will be sliced up and removed, then replaced with prefabricated slabs of concrete that will be lowered into place and joined together. Joannene Kidder, a staff manager in the DOT’s bridge division, said using pre-made slabs of roadway would mean less noise for nearby residents.

    “All of this helps to eliminate the [more common] excavation and jack hammering,” Kidder said, “but there’s no such thing as silent construction.”

    Another daunting task included in the project, awarded to Stanska Koch earlier this year, will be repainting bridge’s iconic arches and steel suspension cables, which haven’t seen a drop of fresh paint in more than two decades. Navalurkar said crews would clean the old, lead-based paint off of the bridge in enclosed negative-pressure cocoons to keep it from entering the air.

    Planning for the bridge’s rehabilitation began in 2007, when a State Department of Transportation report revealed the bridge was structurally deficient by federal standards. Large cracks and missing mortar were found in one of the massive stone blocks that anchor the bridge to the bottom of the East River. Several steel support beams that hold up the bridge’s approach ramps were corroded. The state released its report one month after the August 2007 collapse of the 1-35W bridge outside Minneapolis, in which 13 people died.

    Navalurkar said one of the trickiest parts of the project’s design was mapping out the complex series of detours needed to keep traffic flowing in both Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan. When the Manhattan-bound lanes on the Brooklyn Bridge are closed, inbound traffic from the Manhattan Bridge will be diverted up Chrystie Street and down the Bowery, away from an already-congested Canal Street.

    “The heart of this project is [getting] this work done and minimizing the impact for everybody concerned,” Navalurkar said. “Really, the key is maintenance and protection of traffic.”

    For the most part, members of the Seaport Committee seemed satisfied with the DOT’s plan for mitigating traffic woes during the construction.

    “I thought they covered all their bases,” committee chairman John Fratta said. “They covered a lot of the concerns that we had. We know its going to be a long project and there are going to be hardships, but its something that needs to get done.”

    Committee members asked for toll-free passage on the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel during lane closures on the bridge, a move they said might prevent detoured traffic from tying up the toll-free Manhattan Bridge.

    “The possibility of making the [tunnel] available for free during that time, and only during that time, would seem to make sense,” committee member Paul Hovitz said. “It would take a lot of the brunt off of the streets that the traffic exits onto.”

    “It’s certainly something that’s getting serious consideration,” Kidder answered. “It’s by no means a dead issue.”

    http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/2009...-december.html

    Copyright © 2009 The Tribeca Trib

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    Its concrete roadway is cracked and worn. Its approaches and off-ramps are far too narrow to accommodate the 145,000 vehicles using the bridge each day, and much of the metalwork on the bridge—the anchorages, joints and railings—needs to be replaced and painted.

    Another daunting task included in the project, awarded to Stanska Koch earlier this year, will be repainting bridge’s iconic arches and steel suspension cables, which haven’t seen a drop of fresh paint in more than two decades.
    I'm really quite surprised and shocked that such a beloved landmark is not lovingly tended regularly. I know it wouldn't be cheap and there are many other priorities with limited funding available, but still...there's only one beautiful, unique, irreplaceable BB.

    This is terrible:


    (from the above article)

  6. #66

  7. #67

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    it may be only me but I always find - well not always but you know what I mean - Brooklyn and Manhattan Bgds. sombre, spooky, brooding. I have that poster for Once Upon a Time in America in my mind. Dark forbidding ghostly shapes.....shiver.

  8. #68

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    Nice view from the web cam about 10 minutes ago.


  9. #69
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  10. #70
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    Flashback: Brooklyn Bridge At 127


    Tower of Brooklyn Bridge under construction (Brooklyn Public Library)





    Today the Brooklyn Bridge turns 127 years old, making it around 27 years older than its less-respected neighbor, the Manhattan Bridge. We've already taken a less visual look back at the bridge, noting that it wasn't always beloved by locals (many believed it would take away from the New York Harbor's beauty).
    Today Inside the Apple points out that the grand opening ceremony was elaborate, and included President Chester A. Arthur, Governor Grover Cleveland, and the mayors of New York and Brooklyn (this is back when they were still independent cities!). Visitors in those days paid one penny to cross the bridge by foot, and just after the ceremony a group got scared the bridge was collapsing, causing havoc and leading to the trampling death of 12 people.

    http://gothamist.com/2010/05/24/flas...0Pic=1#gallery

  11. #71
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    Sustaining the Forest, Maintaining a Bridge

    By CATE DOTY

    There are 11,000 tropical wood planks in the Brooklyn Bridge boardwalk, and millions of feet and wheels tread on them every year. Eventually, the boards wear out and must be replaced. Currently, the city uses similar tropical hardwoods, though under pressure from rain-forest advocates, it has begun to test alternative materials.

    But a Manhattan architectural designer and sustainable-development consultant has proposed a third way: a dedicated, sustainably managed patch of rain forest to grow Brooklyn Bridge planks.

    “If we’re going to take wood and use wood,” said Scott Francisco, the designer, “let’s do it in a way that’s beneficial.” Mr. Francisco calls his project the Brooklyn Bridge Forest.
    While Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg promised the United Nations General Assembly that the city would reduce its use of tropical hardwoods, Mr. Francisco argues that the bridge’s boardwalk, a landmark for New Yorkers and tourists alike, should be made out of natural wood, not a synthetic or recycled product, and he says the bridge’s engineers agree.

    So his plan is to solicit donations – probably starting around $1,000 a board, Mr. Francisco said, although a sliding scale is possible – in exchange for the donor’s name burnished into a boardwalk plank.

    The donations would in turn finance an endowment and stewardship for a 5,000-acre forest in an as-yet determined country — perhaps Guyana, which has several sustainable forestry projects. The wood for the boardwalk and future replacements would come from the forest, which would be maintained by the project and protected from development and from non-sustainable agriculture.

    The forest would not grow in Brooklyn, but the bridge would grow from the forest.
    “We want to create a link between the product where it’s used and the forest that it came from,” Mr. Francisco said. “This is an acreage that is going to be managed and monitored within the life of the bridge.”

    Mr. Francisco said that he had been in touch with the city’s Transportation Department, which maintains the bridge and its boardwalk, but that it was too early to discuss any actual partnership with them. The department did not immediately respond for a request to comment on the proposal.

    The idea flies in the face of Mayor Bloomberg’s statement on limiting the use of rain-forest wood in public infrastructure. Rain-forest protection groups also take a hard line against the cutting of any tropical hardwoods, regardless of stewardship. But Mr. Francisco said that rain-forest wood would continue to be harvested in any case, and added that his project provided a way to sustain a forest while using its wood and creating public awareness of the environmental impact.

    The project is in its infancy; right now Mr. Francisco is looking for corporate underwriting. He also realizes he is wading into a contentious debate over the rain forests.

    “Things get very delicate when you start talking about tropical hardwoods,” Mr. Francisco said.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...er=rss&emc=rss

  12. #72
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    Past and Present: Brooklyn Bridge Approach



    Public transportation across the Brooklyn Bridge was one of the major reasons for the bridge’s existence. The bridge opened to pedestrian and vehicular traffic in 1883. The first trolley service rolled along the tracks from the Sand Street Terminal in 1898. The tracks ran on the outermost sides of the bridge, on the same roadway as the horse-drawn vehicles. Above, the elevated railroad lines ran across the bridge to Park Row, in Manhattan, operated by the Brooklyn Elevated Railroad Company. They began in 1883, the year the bridge opened, and were cable cars. The system was electrified in 1896, but the cable method was often used to cross the bridge itself. The photo on the left was taken in 1903, and what strikes me more than the sight of all those tracks, is the multitude of advertising bombarding the public. (I highly recommend going to the Shorpy site and viewing the photo full sized. You can pick out workers on scaffolds, and read every single ad with amazing clarity and detail). Now, as seen on the right, we only have the pedestrian lanes and the lanes for the thousands of cars and vehicles that cross every day. Thank goodness those ads are gone. The past was not always better.


    (Photo: Shorpy.com)


    (Photo: Google Maps)

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...d_presen_3.php

  13. #73
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    Is There A Historic Wine Cellar Hidden Beneath The Brooklyn Bridge?

    By Yi Chen

    Photographer Stanely Greenberg has taken some interesting photos of architecture designs and infrastructures that are often hidden to the everyday passersby. One of the photos is a cave-like tunnel that happens to be an abandoned wine cellar beneath the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. Although no longer in use, the thick, granite-walled cellar has been kept in excellent condition.



    After a bit of history digging, Nicola from Edible Geography discovered that the hidden space was indeed rented out to wine makers to help offset the building cost of the bridge. The temperature under the bridge was consistently cool, even in the hot summer months, perfect for storing expensive wines and champagnes. According to the New York Times, companies like ‘Lyuties Brothers’ paid as much as “$5,000 for wine storage in a vault on the Manhattan side.”

    Unfortunately, these vaults no longer store wines, but rather house maintenance materials. It would be great to see the now abandoned space utilized again for events like drink tasting, secret restaurant dining or converted into a time capsule to store New York-brewed beer beverages.


  14. #74

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    Proposal Could Triple Pedestrian Space on the Brooklyn Bridge

    August 9, 2012 | Michael Lawlor.


    Camera-wielding scofflaw risks crossing into bike lane (Flickr/g.bremer)

    Every day, an average 4,000 pedestrians and 3,100 cyclists cross the upper-level pathway of the Brooklyn Bridge. Commuters, tourists, and joggers vie for space on the congested path, whose width varies from 16 feet to as little as 8 feet—creating a bottleneck for two-way bike traffic. For years observers have recounted harrowing tales of near collisions on the overcrowded span, like the bike-phobic Post pitting reckless cyclists against merely oblivious tourists and the Times calling for the appropriation of a traffic lane for bike use. But now a proposal to double the width of the path could offer a solution to the overcrowding.

    Proposed changes to improve pedestrian access (Courtesy Office of Brad Lander)



    The answer to this conflict is expansion, according to three City Council members from districts adjacent the Bridge: Margaret Chin representing Lower Manhattan and Brad Lander and Stephen Levin representing the Brooklyn waterfront from Greenpoint through Carroll Gardens. “As the lower Manhattan and Brownstone Brooklyn communities continue to grow, the Brooklyn Bridge is becoming an increasingly vital connection,” council member Chin wrote in a statement. “We must ensure this historic destination is equipped to handle our city’s growing transportation demands.”

    Currently the pathway widens as it passes around the iconic bridge towers supporting the bridge’s suspension cables, extending over the innermost traffic lanes below. The council members propose widening the entire pathway to that width, creating a dedicated bike lane on the northern side and an additional pedestrian lane on the south side, thus tripling pedestrian capacity.


    Detail of buttress showing existing path (solid orange) and proposed extension (dotted orange)
    (Courtesy Office of Brad Lander)

    The proposal has not yet been discussed with designers or engineers, and council member Levin suggested a design competition to create a more refined plan. No budget or plans for funding have been established and no timeframe has been set for such a project.

    The council members suggest that it could be integrated with current plans for a redesign of the approach at Tillary Street on the Brooklyn side of the bridge, which currently leaves pedestrians and cyclists to pile up in the middle of the road waiting for a crosswalk. Increased capacity will also demand a redesign of the Manhattan approach, as bottlenecking already creates congestion there as well.

    Any alterations to the bridge will require the approval of city preservationists, as the main span is a city-designated landmark, a national historic landmark, and a national historic civil engineering landmark. Modification would not be unprecedented, however, as the original trolley and railways were removed from the bridge in the 1950s.


    Brooklyn Bridge ca. 1903 showing walkway enclosed by elevated train lines on top and trolley lines on side
    (Courtesy Office of Brad Lander)

    Copyright © 2011 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC



    Rats! I had this idea years ago.

  15. #75
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    That sounds great!

    So long as the mountings are still there and in good condition, it should be little trouble to get the track supports back in and use them as pathways.


    I estimate it would cost only $2.4B!!!

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