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Thread: Biking in New York City

  1. #436

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    Yes, my impression was that the lady Dorothy (from the WSJ) was speaking of the NYC resident demographic: so that seemed correct to me as well.



    ON to another story- here is a little photo quiz for anyone who may be interested: who is the man in the photo. I spotted him today, he seemed to be having a difficult time getting his citibike; putting in his key, pulling on the bike, it would not come out, he would make a call, try again. This photo captures his obvious state of confusion: head scratching and all...LOL

    Here is a hint: this particular bike dock is located just outside the Chelsea Market, inside the building there are many TV studios - 'one of which is NY1'. That should be enough; my next hint will be his initials - but I don't think that will be necessary.

    Last edited by infoshare; June 3rd, 2013 at 04:42 PM.

  2. #437

  3. #438

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    Quoting from this article - The Paranoid Style in Bicycle Politics: A Bicoastal Freak-Out "If the critics were merely expressing their personal displeasure at the prospect of cities better suited to bike travel (or doubts about the efficacy of a particular policy aimed at making cities more bike friendly) that would be fine. Instead they co-opt the language of freedom and oppression, as if orienting cities toward automobiles is natural and libertarian, while bike shares and bike lanes are harbingers of tyranny. That is vapid, paranoid, philosophically incoherent nonsense."

  4. #439
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    Cacophonic polysyllabic pejoratives do not engender an amorphous rejoinder.

    I agree with what they said, but saying a position is idiotic does not, ironically, require so much to do so.

  5. #440

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    Regarding the article Edward mentioned - http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/...ak-out/276514/

    The article points out something that was quite false in Dorothy's opposition to the citi bike share program: she felt she needed to present a 'grand narrative' that goes beyon her own parochial self interest - thus invoking themes of "totalitarianism" and "oppression".

    Why can't people just fess up and be more honest with themselves (and others) as Lofter did in his previous post, and say what the 'real' issue is: "it takes up too much space in my local park", or I dont like the look of those big blue bikes and iron racks on my street, it takes up space and local resources for something that is no use to ME, ect.

    Lofter want's his park space back: now THAT'S being forthcoming. LOL http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showth...l=1#post431124

    I get her point about bloombergs' autocratic style of governing; but I call BS on her political philosophy 'grand narrative' .
    Last edited by infoshare; June 4th, 2013 at 12:31 PM.

  6. #441
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    The irony is that accessible bicycles to the masses is forcibly democratic and the antithesis of totalitarianism

  7. #442
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    Actually, this does not fit any one pure model of government philosophy or economic behavior.

    It IS Capitalistic (they ain't free), but I find it hard to assign any other model to it.

    The difficult thing is simple. In order to have enough to make it practical at any one point, you also make it a rather cumbersome eyesore. The very places you would want to take off or touch down at are rather small venues that do not lend themselves to long lines of industrial grandma bikes with growth challenged storage attachments.

    The one thing I have been watching for, but have not seen yet, is the inherent migration of bikes from one point to another depending on the time of day. I do not remember seeing anything about relocation of the bikes to accommodate this (although I am sure it has been discussed). This will be a bigger issue if people start using them for summer commutes...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    Actually, this does not fit any one pure model of government philosophy or economic behavior. It IS Capitalistic (they ain't free), but I find it hard to assign any other model to it.
    It would be Socialist if there was no cost to the user, Totalitarian if they forced you to use it, Fascist if only White Men could use it, and it would be Capitalistic if it sought to turn a profit. Instead the program seeks to provide a self-sufficient public service.

    I label that as good government


    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    The difficult thing is simple. In order to have enough to make it practical at any one point, you also make it a rather cumbersome eyesore.


    This looks better to you?


    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    The one thing I have been watching for, but have not seen yet, is the inherent migration of bikes from one point to another depending on the time of day. I do not remember seeing anything about relocation of the bikes to accommodate this (although I am sure it has been discussed). This will be a bigger issue if people start using them for summer commutes...
    The reservation system monitors inventory at each location. Depending on current stock or open slots and usage patterns, a van is dispatched to remove or add bikes to specific stations:


  9. #444

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    Problems with the stations still persist - some stations do not work at all (you cannot take or return a bike), some bicycle stalls do no work, their app and website report incorrect number of bicycles.

  10. #445

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    The difficult thing is simple. In order to have enough to make it practical at any one point, you also make it a rather cumbersome eyesore. The very places you would want to take off or touch down at are rather small venues that do not lend themselves to long lines of industrial grandma bikes with growth challenged storage attachments.
    The bikes replace automobiles, not neighborhood parks. This is a choice between being able to get to Central Park on your lunch break or breathing automobile fumes and getting lung disease.

  11. #446

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    Yes, Problems with internal operational glitches:as well as some community opposition.
    The refuse-nics have been raising a 'dirty' protest in Brooklyn Heights --- http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/b...MxqyzgTgl6GXKJ

  12. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward View Post
    The bikes replace automobiles, not neighborhood parks. This is a choice between being able to get to Central Park on your lunch break or breathing automobile fumes and getting lung disease.
    Ed, there are some places (I will have to confirm, they may be few) that are not "parking spots", but public spaces.... I just remember seeing one that was on the edge of a park.....

  13. #448

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    Ed, there are some places...

    I just remember seeing one that was on the edge of a park.....
    You should state where these places are, so we can discuss them.

    "On the edge of a park" means what? Does it interfere with the park?

    There's a station on the edge of Battery Park. A wide expanse of sidewalk.

    It shares a public space with a Bike & Roll rental station, and a few vending cards.



    So if someone doesn't want a public space "cluttered," they would have a problem with any of these items.

    The majority of stations that I've seen are along curbs in what were parking spaces. There's one on the sidewalk at 14th St near West St - behind the stairway to the High Line.

  14. #449

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    I've seen a whole lot of people riding on the citi bikes the past few days (quite a few on the HRBP) and have not had a problem with any of it.
    Not even with the docks on the end of my own block.
    A few stations are definitely in bad places and will need to be moved, but after that (and a few other kinks)...
    What i really find annoying : (0:25)

  15. #450
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    The Hudson river path is more dangerous to cyclists than regular streets, the worst offenders are crossing pedestrians who don't look and those that walk on the path taking up wide areas

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