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Thread: Biking in New York City

  1. #526

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    the ultimate bait and switch.

  2. #527
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    ^TWHS


    q

  3. #528

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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    Isn't it just for a year?
    Wait, what? Six months of which grass doesn't grow?

  4. #529
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Who cares? The new lawn will look fantastic tomorrow when all the photographers are there.

  5. #530
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Default From our friends at Curbed -

    Although Two Trees principal Jed Walentas was present and unwilling to take credit for the improvements, he was widely toasted by the politicians and community leaders in attendance. Of course, the pop-up park will only be open for about a year, at which point the bulldozers will arrive to begin construction on the SHoP-designed megaproject's first building.

  6. #531
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Being able to walk across the Verrazano Narrows bridge would be awesome, I imagine.


    Verrazano Bridge Path Advocates Release Map, Ask MTA to Commit to Study

    by Stephen Miller

    The Harbor Ring Committee, a coalition working to complete the missing link in a route around New York Harbor with a bicycle and pedestrian path across the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, has released a map of the bike route, a 50-mile loop across four boroughs and Hudson County, New Jersey. Meanwhile, advocates are trying to get the MTA to firmly commit to a feasibility study they hope could pave the way for building the bridge path.



    Advocates for a biking and walking path on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge have released a map for the Harbor Loop, a 50-mile route with a key missing link.

    Image: Harbor Loop Committee

    In the spring, advocates circulated a petition calling on Governor Cuomo to support a bridge path. While the governor hasn’t come out with an endorsement, it did get the attention of MTA Bridges and Tunnels. “A feasibility study, addressing a host of issues including cost, structural issues, operational issues and impact on the surrounding neighborhoods would have to be conducted,” spokesperson Judie Glave said, adding that the agency “is considering studying this issue as part of a future reconstruction project” that would not begin until 2014 or later.

    Advocates, who have been in touch with MTA Bridges and Tunnels President James Ferrara, say they hope the planned relocation of ramps on the Brooklyn side between the bridge and the Belt Parkway will include a path feasibility study. A separate ongoing capital project that could affect plans for a bike/ped path involves replacing and widening the upper deck to accommodate a bus and carpool lane.

    “Honestly, this study I think would be a formality,” Harbor Ring Committee member David Wenger told Streetsblog. The bridge, designed by architects Ammann & Whitney, includes space for paths, but they were never built. In 1997, the same firm prepared a feasibility study for the Department of City Planning, including a preferred option for a path design that was similar to the path on the George Washington Bridge, another Amman & Whitney project.

    The new feasibility study would likely update the old one, including more information about security and how the ramp would interact with reconfigured Brooklyn-side ramps. ”There should be no reason why this should not be feasible,” Wegner said.

    As advocates push for a study next year, the online petition has gathered more than 2,000 signatures, plus about 500 signatures on paper. Comments from petition signers have been very helpful in convincing elected officials and the MTA of the path’s value, Wenger said. Nearly a quarter of all commenters say they would use the path as part of their daily commute.

    In the meantime, the effort continues to rack up endorsements from elected officials, including Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, State Senator Marty Golden, and City Council members Deborah Rose and Vincent Gentile. Democratic City Council nominee John Mancuso has also endorsed the plan. The Harbor Ring Committee will soon reach out to borough president candidates, as well as more state legislators in both Staten Island and Brooklyn, Meredith Sladek of Transportation Alternatives said.

    With the completion of a multi-use path on the new Goethals Bridge scheduled for 2017, Sladek said that the group might look at extending the loop route to include more of New Jersey, as well as the George Washington Bridge.

    For those who can’t wait until a bridge path is built, the committee has already organized rides on the route and will soon print up to 5,000 copies of its newly-released Harbor Ring map for distribution to local bike shops. The map includes detailed information about the route, local bike shops, and transit. There’s just one pesky gap.

    http://www.streetsblog.org/2013/09/2...mmit-to-study/

  7. #532
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    so you're supposed to take a boat back from jersey? what the heck kind of bike path is that, might as well have a boat take you under the verrazano while you're at it

  8. #533

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    Groningen: The world's CyclingCity


  9. #534

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    I heard this morning that membership fees may increase by 50%. Not sure if they mean just for yearly memberships or all.


    FILE -JULY 2: According to reports July 2, 2014, REQX Ventures, a company affiliated with Equinox and Related Companies, a real estate company that owns Equinox, will buy at least 51 percent of Alta Bicycle Share, which runs Citi Bike share in New York City. Alta also runs bike share programs in Boston, the Bay Area, Washington, Toronto, Chicago, Columbus and Chattanooga.
    NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 21: Citi Bikes await riders at a bicycle station in Manhattan on March 21, 2014 in New York City. The leaders of Citi Bike are trying to raise millions of dollars to keep the money-losing bike-share program in business, following a severe winter which greatly reduced bicycle usage in New York City. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) (Credit: Getty Images / John Moore)


    Transit
    Citi Bike to test valet service at East Village dock


    By DAN RIVOLI July 2, 2014


    Citi Bike is taking a page from restaurants and hotels by testing a valet service at a dock where people can avoid the frustration of trying to find a place to park their ride.
    The weeknight valet service, which will launch at a dock on Avenue A and 7th Street on Monday, will be manned with at least two employees who will remove bikes once the dock fills up so that a couple of spaces will be always be available from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

    "On weekday evenings, the stations there definitely tend to fill up very quickly," said Citi Bike spokeswoman Dani Simons. "It's a very popular neighborhood for people."
    The valet will have a special debut from 6 to 11 p.m. Friday at two stations, Pearl St. and Hanover Square in Manhattan; and Henry and Poplar streets in Brooklyn.

    The valet program will last through Labor Day, though riders will have to try their luck finding a dock with space on weekends and major holidays, as well as during extreme weather events and heavy rain.
    To free up spaces elsewhere in the East Village, large tricycles that can carry up to four Citi Bikes at a time will be used to speed up rebalancing at docks, instead of relying on trucks that move slowly through traffic.

    Simons said Citi Bike had been quietly testing their plan out in other East Village docks before landing on the Avenue A and 7th Street location. If the pilot is successful, Citi Bike will look to expand the service into other neighborhoods that need extra spots, according to Simons.

    "The valet bike parking is something I think provides a sense of reassurance," she said, for people to "find bike parking during our peak season, during peak hours in this neighborhood with peak demand for bike share."

    http://www.amny.com/transit/citi-bik...dock-1.8645968

  10. #535
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    One thing they need to work on is the damned loud noise - CHUNK CHUNK CHUNK - that is heard every time folks try (and try again) to re-dock their "borrowed" bikes. But I guess when you're slamming metal into metal that should be expected (not that the bike share team thought about that -- or cares much about it, either).

  11. #536

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    They are bringing attention to that, though. I read their advice somewhere that docking works fine without slamming, just gently guiding the bike.

  12. #537
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Painting The Town Green

    New York City's de Blasio administration plans to build on Bloomberg's bike legacy.

    by Henry Melcher


    Courtesy NYCDOT

    In early September, New York City Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg hopped on a Citi Bike and pedaled up Manhattan’s newest protected bike lane. She was headed to a press conference where Bicycling Magazine would announce that the country’s biggest city was also its most bike-friendly. In just one year, New York had jumped from seventh place to first—topping the likes of Portland, Minneapolis, and Boulder.

    Trottenberg touted New York’s bike culture, but acknowledged that the city’s top billing was not necessarily her doing. After all, she had only been commissioner for nine months. The credit, she explained, went to her predecessor, Janette Sadik-Khan, the firebrand commissioner who fundamentally transformed New York City’s streets under Mayor Bloomberg. At the announcement, Trottenberg promised that the new administration would build on that impressive legacy.

    During Bloomberg’s tenure, over 350 miles of bike lanes were created (about 30 of which were protected), 16,000 bike racks were installed, and Citi Bike was launched. According to a new Department of Transportation (DOT) report, these investments paid huge dividends: As significantly more cyclists appeared on city streets from 2001 to 2013 the risk of them getting seriously injured dropped 74 percent.

    The city routinely studies safety and traffic patterns.

    During these years, the politics of bike lanes shifted dramatically as well. There is perhaps nobody who personifies that change more than Bill de Blasio. The politician who once called Sadik-Khan a “radical” and labeled himself an “incrementalist” on bike lanes, is now trying to double the amount New Yorkers bike by 2020. De Blasio likely knows that if he is serious about hitting that ambitious goal, he will not be able to do things incrementally.

    While the mayor and his DOT have not offered many specifics about where and when bike lanes will be installed, de Blasio has pledged to add more bike lanes and expand Citi Bike into the outer boroughs. But before the popular, yet financially strained, bikeshare program can be completed it has to be bailed-out. Now, after months of negotiations, it is widely expected that Related Companies will do just that. If a deal is finalized, more blue bikes should appear on the road next year.

    Despite the mayor’s promise to make the city better for cyclists, he has been met with skepticism, and often criticism, from some bike advocates. They say the NYPD is too aggressively ticketing cyclists, too often parking in bike lanes, and that bike safety is not featured prominently enough in Vision Zero—the administration’s initiative to reduce, or eliminate, pedestrian fatalities.

    Paul Steely White, the executive director of Transportation Alternatives, disagrees. He said that the administration’s focus on street safety will improve conditions for everyone, including cyclists. “In establishing Vision Zero as the new framework for New York City transportation policy, the administration set the stage for a significant gain with the bike network,” he said. Looking forward, Steely White hopes the administration will make a strong push for bike lanes, especially on major arterial roads, but in the meantime, he explained, lowering the city’s default speed limit makes a big difference for anybody crisscrossing the city by bike.

    As the final bike lanes planned under Mayor Bloomberg appear on city streets, there is reason for cyclists to be optimistic about what’s next for New York’s bike infrastructure. If Citi Bikes start appearing in more neighborhoods, there will likely be enough public, and political pressure, to ensure that bike lanes start forming around them. In Manhattan, the Trottenberg-led DOT could continue the island’s impressive transformation into a bike-friendly hub by approving plans for a pair of bike lanes that cut through the heart of Midtown—one going up 6th Avenue and the other down 5th Avenue. A decade ago, that type of proposal would have been unthinkable, but things have changed dramatically since then. And soon enough cyclists will know if Mayor de Blasio really has too.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articl...5#.VCEmYxZuW3w

  13. #538
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    For those who've drunk too much Starbucks and eaten too much subway?

    Meanwhile, back to architecture, this is Art Deco gem 261 Fifth Avenue, designed by Buchman & Kahn, 1929.

    http://www.newyorkitecture.com/261-fifth-avenue/
    Last edited by Merry; March 23rd, 2015 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Updated link

  14. #539

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    ^
    Correction: That's 261 Fifth Ave.

    The retail signage is controlled by LPC, although Subway is pushing the envelope.

  15. #540
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ Thanks, Zippy, fixed.

    Subway certainly doesn't match the other side of the entrance. How many times do they have to mention their name?!

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