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Thread: City Hall Park

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    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
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    Default City Hall Park

    Did we already discuss yesterday's Sun article that much of the northern part of City Hall Park was going to reopen this summer? (I'd post the article, but the link no longer works).

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I posted the NY1 story on that HERE about a week ago -- used that thread when I found there was no existing thread for CITY HALL

    You and I are the only ones who seem to give a shake

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    I was by today and tried to figure out what new area was opened.

    I care.

    It doesn't seem like anyone is going to get near the steps of city hall.

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    Does "by today" mean you're out of the hospital, BR?

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    Oh yes, I got my stitches out today. Another month or so in the sling and then another month of physical therapy. I hope to be fully operational (and in the best shape of my life by Memorial day. I'm down another 15lbs. I'm at 165 to my pre-accident 190. I'm dreaming of being a beach adonis this summer (a truly "last hurrah"). From there, it is middle age and "let's see how long I can keep this regimen up."

    Off topic, but thanks for asking!

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Parks Dept. to Reopen City Hall Park's North End

    Tribeca Trib
    By Andrea Appleton
    POSTED FEB. 15, 2007

    For more than five years, much of the green oasis of City Hall Park has sat dormant behind locked gates, ostensibly for security reasons. This July a significant chunk of the north end of the park will finally reopen to the public.

    On Feb. 20, Manhattan Borough Parks Commissioner Bill Castro told a meeting of Community Board 1 that five gates will reopen, on Chambers Street, Centre Street and Broadway.




    According to the plan, the northern part of the park, from the back of City Hall to Chambers Street, will be open from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. every day. The northeast and the northwest lawn areas will be open to the public, and the walkway running from Broadway to Centre Street will be reopened. However, access will be restricted when the Ross Academy, a charter school in the Tweed Courthouse, is using portions of the lawns and pathway for recess activities. Castro said this would include the hours between 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. on weekdays, as well as two Saturday mornings a month. A new fence will be erected behind City Hall for security reasons.

    At the meeting, Castro received sustained applause for the decision to reopen the north end of the park. But a Downtown resident whose name over the years has become synonymous with the fight to reopen City Hall Park’s gated areas, which include about two-thirds of the park, stole the show.

    “I want to thank Skip Blumberg for all that he’s done for this park,” said board member Paul Hovitz. The room broke into loud applause, and others called out praise.

    Blumberg and his Friends of City Hall Park have been lobbying to get the park reopened for nearly as long as it’s been closed. Until now, the city claimed that security concerns around City Hall trumped the public’s right to park access.

    Matters came to a head last September, when the group’s attorney, Derek Adler, sent a letter to the mayor’s office, threatening a lawsuit.




    The group claimed that the park’s closing represented an “alienation of public land,” an action that requires the state legislature’s approval. A flurry of meetings with the deputy mayor, the NYPD, and Commissioner Castro followed.

    “The lawsuit made this a priority of theirs,” Blumberg said later, in a phone interview. “But they were giving it back only an inch at a time.”

    After a Feb. 9 meeting, attended by Parks Department representatives, representatives of local elected officials, Friends of City Hall Park, and State Senator Martin Connor, park advocates and the city reached an agreement just in time for the first scheduled announcement, which took place at a meeting of CB1’s Seaport/Civic Center Committee on Feb. 13.

    Those in attendance, when that first announcement was made, seemed overwhelmingly to approve of the park’s reopening. But it also provided a forum for some to voice their reservations.

    “When we’re discussing the northern and the southern end of the park, it’s probably not so much a security question as it is a potential privatizing of what should be public park space,” said Bess Matassa, an aide to Assemblywoman Deborah Glick.

    “I understand it’s not the Parks Department that chose to site a school in the park, but portioning off municipal land and doling it out at certain hours to private groups is something that this community shouldn’t have to deal with.”

    Others, while they applauded the outcome, questioned the time and energy that the reopening required of community groups.“It’s not a good policy for the city to lock up our parks,” said Geoffrey Croft, president of NYC Park Advocates, “and groups with limited resources shouldn’t have to sue the city to get their park space opened.”

    Skip Blumberg, while elated at the prospect of the park reopening, is not resting on his laurels.

    “We have given our support of their written plan,” he said, “but there remains the threat of a lawsuit until the park is reopened as promised.”

    As part of that plan, new amenities will appear in the northeast portion of the park. On Feb. 23, the Friends of City Hall Park met with park designer George Velonakis to see a presentation on them. His suggestions included a new triangular lawn in the southern part of the plaza, additional year-round greenery, and an assortment of tables and chairs. Castro has also pledged to increase staffing at the park to ensure proper maintenance.

    “It sounds excellent,” Blumberg said afterwards. “George understands our recommendations for a simple, low-maintenance, year-round ‘green oasis.’”

    Despite their insistence that the fight is not yet over, the Friends of City Hall Park invite all “civic-minded neighbors” to a get-together on March 9. The group will convene at the Murray Street Grill, 6 Murray St., from 6 to 8 p.m. to celebrate their hard-won victory.




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    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
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    Default An open letter about the reopening of the Park

    I don't normally publish private letters, but this came into my mailbox from "Friends of City Hall Park" and is titled an "Open Letter" . . . so here's the update from Skip Blumberg himself .. .

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}

    July 31, 2007

    An open letter to NYC DPR Manhattan Borough Commissioner William Castro

    Good day, Bill ~

    THE GATES TO THE NORTHERN SECTION OF CITY HALL PARK ARE RE-OPENED! Reaching this phase is a special moment and truly exciting for us!

    We must thank you again, Bill, for your persistence and your forward-momentum in achieving this welcome action.

    Our recent joint presentation to the Friends, press and politicos in the park last Tuesday went well. (please see report following). We are glad to receive your update about the fulfillment of our agreement. We hope you understand why it was important to present the short list of other new park-related community issues. Your answers were direct, clear, respectful and friendly to all questioners.

    For all the reasons we have been communicating during the past several years, the re-opening of the northern section of the park is very meaningful to all New Yorkers and especially to those of us who live nearby.

    Clearly, Mayor Bloomberg is a mensch. And he and DPR understand our true goals. The replication of the new fence is well done. But alsoŠ. Hundreds of new plants in the beds! Trimmed trees! Lawns freshly mowed! Fresh paint on the existing metalwork! The Tweed machinery hidden (and protected from overzealous players)! Even scraping the gum from the NE plaza sidewalks!!! We thank DPR and especially recognize Commissioner Benepe for his standards of excellence and quality in his stewardship of City Hall Park.

    We were pleased to see the first benches in place in the NE Plaza last weekŠ before the pavement holes were drilled, and with the benches elevated on their uninstalled moorings, all the benches were already filled with park-lovers! This new seating is an instant success! It is a great beginning to creating more greenspace and park amenities in the plaza and in lower Manhattan. We look forward to meet with you and George Vellonakis at your earliest convenience to thank you and to discuss other options to achieve our agreed improvements to the plaza or other creative ideas. How¹s the week of August 13th? We should also invite CM Gerson¹s office and CB#1.

    DPR is to be commended for the deployment of a very visibly increased DPR staff that prepared for the re-opening. We appreciate that skilled, hard-working, and highly motivated maintenance and gardening staffs are assigned to work in City Hall Park. From supervisors to community service workers, all DPR staff at our park are always pushing hard to make the best possible park. This is a highly trafficked pedestrian crossroads as well as the civic center, a community park and tourist site in a congested neighborhood that is getting ever more congested. Your parkies have their work cut out for themselves. The key is that, from our perspective, the DPR staff, already short staffed, truly cares about keeping the park¹s high quality. Now, with the renewed heavy pedestrian use in the northern section and the hundreds of new plants that have been generously added (as well as the extremely vigorous park use by the RGA Charter School), the DPR workload is increasing by almost double. We urge that you assign the additional seasonal and full-time gardening and maintenance DPR staff which your supervisors recommend and that you promised at the 7/24 meeting. This added crew is needed as of today with the re-opening of the section.

    Since this is an open letter having reached our quest, we have to thank all the volunteers, Friends, neighbors, and sponsors including special thanks to Emigrant Savings Bank, Commerce Bank, Murray Street Grill, Soho Services, Papetti Associates LLC, Citizens for NYC, New Yorkers for Parks, and In Motion Productions, Inc, as well as Julie Menin, Noah Pfefferblit, Rick Landman and Michael Levine at CB#1, NYS Senator Martin Connor (as well as Marty Algaze and Matt Viggiano), NYS Assemblymember Deborah Glick (and Bess Matassa), Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum (and Jane Schatz), NYS Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (and Paul Goldstein), NYC Councilmember Alan Gerson (as well as Tammy To, Sayar Lonial, and Cindy Voorspuy), Boro Pres Scott Stringer (and Gregory Brender), U.S. Representative Gerald Nadler, City Hall Counsel Anthony Crowell, Deputy Mayor Patti Harris, and Derek Adler and Tom Rozner (our legal counsel at Hughes, Hubbard and Reed)!

    We look forward to continuing our good working relationship with City Hall and being kept up-to-date on any relevant deadlines or revisions as we approach the completion of all aspects of our 2/13/07 agreement. We are available for consultation as affirmed in the agreement or for any other assistance we may give in support of DPR to make for the best possible City Hall Park.

    The report of last Tuesday¹s get-together (attached and following) is towards that goal.

    We thank you for this glorious day.

    For all friends of Ctiy Hall Park ~

    Skip Blumberg
    Friends of City Hall Park

  8. #8

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    Mayor Bloomberg orders $1M worth of repairs on sidewalk near City Hall

    BY ADAM LISBERG
    DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU
    Monday, April 14th 2008, 4:00 AM

    Problem with your sidewalk? Perhaps you should ask the mayor to drop by.
    The city is spending $1 million to fix thebluestone sidewalks around City Hall after Mayor Bloomberg watched several people - including two staffers - slip and fall on rainy days.

    "He walked in and said, 'What are we doing about this?'" said mayoral spokesman Jason Post. "Then he made a call."

    That was sometime in the fall. By mid-December, the controller's office gave the Parks Department an emergency safety exemption to have a contractor do the work quickly. In February, crews started blasting the sidewalks with a blowtorch - or "thermal roughening," as they call it - to burn away the slippery top layer of stone.

    The city has known about the problem for at least five years, after lawyer Steven Kartagener slipped on a rainy, leaf-covered slab in November 2002 and tore the meniscus and ligaments in his knee.

    "When it's wet, it's like glass," Kartagener said. "I stepped on it, and my foot went out from under me, and I went flying."

    He filed a notice of claim against the city, but did not file suit. However, a woman who slipped on ice and snow there in 2002 sued for her injuries and won a $15,000 settlement.

    The blowtorch process started on the east side of the park, near the entrance to the 4, 5 and 6 subway lines - the same exit Bloomberg uses every day.

    It will continue around the rest of the block over the next two months.

    Copyright 2088 The New York Daily News.

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    Suddenly were are transported into the future! Whoa!

  10. #10
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Regina Kellerman, 84, Locator of New York’s First City Hall, Dies

    NY TIMES
    By BRUCE WEBER
    May 20, 2008

    Regina Kellerman, an architectural historian whose research led to the literal unearthing of New York City’s first City Hall, died on May 13 in Mount Vernon, N.Y. She was 84 and lived in Greenwich Village, the neighborhood in Manhattan where much of her work was focused and about whose buildings she may have known more than anyone else.

    The cause was pulmonary failure, said David Hennessey, a nephew.

    It was in 1970, after five years of work on a doctoral dissertation both in New York and the Netherlands, that Ms. Kellerman was able to pinpoint the exact location — on Pearl Street, near Coenties Alley — of the three-story building that was used as a stadthuis, or city hall, from 1653, when the city was incorporated by the Dutch, until 1699, when the building was torn down by the English. The site was excavated, and remnants of a building, which were removed, were found right where she said they would be.

    Ms. Kellerman had a seemingly inexhaustible interest in the streets and structures of Lower Manhattan. In the early 1960s, when the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission was making its initial recommendations for structures to be designated, she worked as a volunteer researcher, later becoming the commission’s research director. Her work was instrumental in the commission’s designation of historic districts in Greenwich Village in 1969 and in SoHo in 1973.

    In 1981, she became the founding executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and the pamphlet she produced there, “The Architecture of the Greenwich Village Waterfront,” formed the basis of the argument for the westward extension of the Village historic district in 2006.

    “She conducted a building-by-building survey — who built them, who lived in them, why they were important to the area,” said Sheryl Woodruff, the society’s director of operations. “A lot of it, of course, was important in terms of the area’s maritime history.”

    Ms. Kellerman’s survey made the case that much had been left out of the original district, Ms. Woodruff said, “the part of the village that had not been seen as landmarkable, where the houses were built for the working class and were not as grand as the town houses of the central village.”

    Regina Maria Kohrman was born in Danbury, Conn., on Nov. 23, 1923. Her father, Hubert Kohrman, was a dentist who patented an apparatus for making artificial teeth. She attended Yale and Columbia and received her Ph.D. in architectural history from Pennsylvania State University. In 1953, she married Richard Kellerman, a reporter who later became director of public affairs for CBS Inc. and a deputy commissioner for public affairs for the New York City Police Department. He died in 1980.

    Her survivors include her companion, Eugene Brody of Mount Vernon, N.Y., and a sister, Mary Snow of New Milford, Conn.

    “In the early ’80s, I lived three blocks from her,” Mr. Hennessey, her nephew, said. “You’d go for a walk, and she could look at any building and tell you what year it was built and who the architect was. She knew the Village and SoHo inside and out.”

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

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    Neighbors wary of DOT plans for City Hall Park bike path

    By Matt Dunning
    POSTED JUNE 11, 2009




    Despite adamant neighborhood opposition, a Community Board 1 committee approved a plan to run a bicycle path through a quiet walkway and seating area of City Hall Park.

    The city’s Department of Transportation (DOT) unveiled plans to install a bicycle path through the recently reopened north end of City Hall Park at a meeting of the Seaport/Civic Center Committee June 10. The committee approved the plan, but not before attaching a list of restrictions to the path’s use that would force cyclists to dismount their bikes in the park.

    The DOT’s director of Bicycle and Pedestrian Programs, Ryan Russo, said the path would occupy the south side of the existing walkway connecting Warren Street and Centre Street, and would provide a valuable thruway for cyclists crossing Manhattan from Hudson River Park to the Brooklyn Bridge.

    “No facility exists right now for bringing cyclists from the greenway to the bridge, and making that high-quality connection is essential for regular people choosing cycling as a transportation option,” Russo said.

    Currently, Russo said, most bikers trying to cross Lower Manhattan from Hudson River Park use Chambers Street, which he said is too challenging for the average rider, and dangerous, too.

    “It’s narrow, it’s two-way, you’ve got left turns, right turns, turning conflicts, trucks loading, buses, pedestrians, jaywalking, all sorts of activity making it very challenging for cyclists,” Russo said.

    After examining crash bicycle crash statistics in Lower Manhattan, particularly on Chambers Street, Russo said the DOT determined a designated bike lane on Warren Street would be a much safer option for cyclists. The proposal includes signage and street markings indicating the lane’s boundaries and directional flow. On the City Hall Park walkway, Russo said plans would include bicycle stamps on the south half of the walkway, as well as signage and asphalt ramps where the walkway meets Broadway and Centre Street.

    “We’re very excited about this project,” Russo said. “We think it’s going to work.”

    Russo’s optimism seemed lost on committee members and most neighborhood residents at the meeting. Committee member Ann De Falco said she worried about pedestrian/cyclist conflict, and was especially concerned about the safety of parents with baby strollers and older pedestrians. Peter Glazier, another committee member, said he was afraid a bike path would eventually attract skateboarders and rollerbladers to the park as well.

    “We’ve seen this happen down here underneath the Brooklyn Bridge,” Galzier said. “There’s nothing that’s going to prohibit them from doing that here. If you allow bikes [into the park], skateboarders are not going to be far behind and the rollerbladers are not going to be far behind them.”

    Warren Street resident Rick Landman, a member of the Friends of City Hall Park neighborhood group, said he doubted whether there was enough room on the walkway, which fluctuates between 10 and 23 feet wide, to accommodate both cyclists and pedestrians, let alone those who simply want to sit and enjoy the park. Landman also said he would oppose any bench removal in the name of a bike lane, though Russo assured the assembly that the DOT did not plan on removing any benches or other seating from the park.

    “The whole atmosphere is going to change,” said Landman, who said he’s never had a problem cycling on Chambers Street. “Within the last year or so when they reopened the north end of the park, it really became our more like our community park again. All of the sudden the people that want to sit and talk or read, now they feel like they’re in the middle of a bike lane. I’m not anti-cyclist, but I really think this is not the right location.”

    Not everyone at the meeting opposed the DOT’s proposal. Seaport resident Andrea Katz said she thought a bike path connecting the Brooklyn Bridge to Hudson River Park might actually reduce traffic in Lower Manhattan by encouraging more New Yorkers to ditch their cars and pick up a bicycle.

    “In my experience in that park, I think there is room for a bike path,” Katz said. “Every bike path I’ve ever been on in this city has been imperfect, but we are also getting all of these new buildings here, and with all these people moving into the city looking to ride bicycles, you’re going to have thousands of new cyclists. You have to have someplace to put them.”

    After much deliberation, the committee voted to approve the DOT’s proposal. However, it attached a lengthy list of restrictions of use and other provisos to the proposal before sending it to CB1’s general meeting later this month. Chief among the restrictions, the committee said cyclists would be required to get off their bikes and walk them through the park, rather than ride them. Committee chairman John Fratta said Parks Enforcement Patrol officers would have to be stationed at both ends of the walkway to make sure riders were adhering to the dismount rule. The committee also said the bicycle stamps on the walkway pavement needed to be bigger, and that the DOT could not remove any benches from the park.

    http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/news...yhallpath.html

    The Tribeca Trib · 401 Broadway, 5th Floor · New York, NY · 10013 · 212.219.9709

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    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Yeah!

    They should put the bike lanes where they are the most inconvenient and least likely to be used by people on bikes!!!!



    I understand what they are saying, but if you do not accomodate the riders, you are really not doing anything worth, well, doing!

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post

    ... a plan to run a bicycle path through a quiet walkway and seating area of City Hall Park.

    ... a list of restrictions to the path’s use that would force cyclists to dismount their bikes in the park.

    ... worried about pedestrian/cyclist conflict, and was especially concerned about the safety of parents with baby strollers and older pedestrians ...
    The solution is right there ^

    Cyclists who choose to use the new path through CIty Hall Park should dsimount and walk their bike for that short stretch. if they do not want to dismount then they can ride on the streets around City Hall -- either north along Chambers or south to Park Row.

    Bottom line: There is really no easy way to get a bicycle from the streets of Manhattan onto the Brooklyn Bridge bike path without dismounting at some point.

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Set in Stone:
    DOT Installed Bike Path Despite CB1 Rejection




    TRIBECA TRIB
    By Matt Dunning
    JULY 2, 2008

    It seems the city’s Department of Transportation was only paying Community Board 1 a courtesy last month when it showed them plans for a new bike path through City Hall Park.

    CB1 members and neighbors of the Lower Manhatten park were stunned June 30 to find that the DOT had installed a bike path through the heart of the park’s quiet northern walkway, despite the board’s overwhelming rejection of the plan less than two weeks earlier. Members of the board lashed out at the city, and in particular, the Bloomberg administration, after discovering their vote had apparently fallen on deaf ears.

    “Typical Bloomberg,” said CB1 member Paul Hovitz. “He’s really not interested in community input unless it supports his position.”

    In June, the DOT unveiled plans for a bike path connecting Hudson River Park to the Brooklyn Bridge. The proposed path was to run the length of Warren Street from the river to the bridge, with a short, connecting jaunt through the north end of City Hall Park, between City Hall and the Tweed Courthouse. After seeing the plans, CB1 voted not to support the plan. Two weeks later, the path — indicated by markers set in the pavement and several small signs — was installed anyway.

    Julie Menin, CB1’s chairwoman, said she was shocked.

    “We couldn’t have been more emphatic in that we strongly objected to the [path],” Menin said. “To do this in, really, our only open space in that area doesn’t make any sense at all.”

    Menin said she would raise those objections with Luis Sanches, the DOT’s Lower Manhattan Borough Commissioner.

    “They have to reconsider this,” Menin said. “It poses too much of a safety risk to pedestrians and children playing in the park.”

    Skip Blumberg, whose Friends of City Hall Park was instrumental in getting the park path reopened in 2007, said he wanted to meet with city officials as soon as possible to resolve the bike path issue.

    “We’re hoping the mayor is a good neighbor,” Blumberg said, adding that he had requested a meeting with Deputy Mayor Patricia Harris. “We want to sit down and deal with them in a reasonable way.”




    Specifically, Blumberg said he wants the city to require cyclists to dismount and walk their bikes through the park. Last month, DOT officials seemed to entertain that possibility when they appeared before the board’s Seaport/Civic Center Committee.

    The department has since said that a dismount rule will not be implemented in the park. Now Blumberg said city officials could find themselves on the business end of organized protests, or worse.

    “We always have a legal option, and we’ll go to the press, and we’ll follow with a lawsuit,” Blumberg said. “A tornado of protests is swarming, and it’s hard to know what the result would be. We know that City Hall is capable of action, and we hope we can avoid a big spectacle.”

    “This is part of a pattern of disrespect,” he added, referring to an as-yet unfulfilled agreement between his group and the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, which provides a number of amenities for park users in exchange for the city’s closure of more than 2 acres of the park for security reasons. “It’s very disappointing.”

    Laura Braddock, who lives three blocks from the park, said she couldn’t remember the last time the city had rolled out such an ill-conceived plan, and worried the path initiative could trigger a public backlash against the very cyclists the city says it is trying to protect.

    “It’s the dumbest idea I’ve heard in a while,” Braddock said. “It’s just nuts to have the park overloaded like this. It’s going to turn more people against bikes.”

    When the DOT first presented the idea of a bike path in the park, many worried about the possibility of injuries, both to pedestrians and cyclists. Now that the path is in place, frequent users of the park say injuries are no longer a possibility; they’re an inevitability.

    “Bloomberg is going to look very silly when someone is seriously hurt on that path, and that clock is ticking,” said CB1 member Roger Byrom, a Warren Street resident. “It’s going to happen.”

    According to the DOT, Chambers Street has the most bike accidents of any Downtown cross street between Worth and Barclay. Most cyclists crossing Lower Manhattan from Hudson River Park use Chambers Street, which is too challenging for the average rider, DOT officials said. With the park path in place and the Warren Street leg of the bike route slated to be completed sometime in the next few weeks, DOT spokesman Seth Solomonow said the department is counting on success in other parts of the city to replicate itself in City Hall Park.

    “Shared spaces like this are found elsewhere in the city and in public areas around the country and the world,” Solomonow said. “We will monitor the changes and make any necessary adjustments, with feedback from the community."

    A second DOT spokesman would not say why CB1’s recommendations were apparently omitted from the path’s implementation, but that the department believes that any safety concerns the board might have had were addressed in the path’s initial design.

    Despite assurances of safety, the consensus among park users seemed to be that the path could only result in one thing.

    “I think it’s a bad mistake, and I think they’re going to have a lot of accidents on their hands,” daily parkgoer and nearby Broadway resident Norma Fontane said. “A lot of kids are going to get hurt, and the elderly, they can’t get out of the way fast enough. This is not the right avenue for them. They’re going to have a lot of problems, and maybe a lot of lawsuits for the city.”

    Fontane was even more incensed when told the department had ignored her local community board’s recommendation.

    “How could [the DOT] do that,” she wondered as she fed a small flock of pigeons against the southern fence of the walkway. “That’s not right. It’s like the President. He just does whatever he wants, and we don’t have a choice, do we?”

  15. #15
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    ... The department has since said that a dismount rule will not be implemented in the park.

    ... Blumberg said city officials could find themselves on the business end of organized protests, or worse.
    Not that I'm advocating civil disobedience or anything as truly American as that , but as a pro-bike / pro-let's get along type ...

    It would seem that a mere 4 - 5 folks standing and talking on that rather narrow pathway would mean that a cyclist had no choice but to dismount and walk the bike through the park ...

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