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Thread: Domino Sugar Refinery in Williamsburg

  1. #31

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    Does just being old make something historic? There's nothing historic about a rundown old sugar refinery. If they still had all the old factories in Brooklyn, and started firing them up and using then for their intended purposes, the same NIMBYs who want to save this old brinkpile would be beotching to high heaven about it.

    Nuke it flat and start from scratch.
    Last edited by MikeW; October 4th, 2006 at 01:06 PM.

  2. #32

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    I was sifting through the Open House NY program when it occured to me that the Domino Factory would be a perfect site for something like the Chelsea Market, which also was an old factory (Nabisco Oreo). Any type of supermarket/large food retailer is really needed in that area and it already has the layout for heavy traffic.

  3. #33
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeW View Post

    If they still had all the old factories in Brooklyn, and started firing them up and using then for their intended purposes, the same NIMBYs who want to save this old brinkpile would be beotching to high heaven about it.
    Nobody is saying "fire up the furnace" ...

    The point is adaptive re-use of existing structures.

    It works pretty much everywhere.

  4. #34
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    I like Ando's idea. The neighborhood will definitely need more commercial space with all the condos. This spot is probably too far from the subway, but that didn't hurt fairway in red hook (though the idea of parking lots makes me angry)

  5. #35
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    I'm sorry but this landmarking of factories is getting a bit inane. If you preserve such old (and decrepit in most cases) relics, I don't know that they will have much function. Many of these places contain toxic elements that would make this a very difficult place to convert into any sort of living, museum or office quarters not to mention whether or not the layouts even allow for these functions. Besides the fact that they are virtually nonfunctional, they are absolute eyesores.
    Last edited by TREPYE; October 6th, 2006 at 01:53 PM.

  6. #36

    Default Domino and the 2005 rezoning

    Quote Originally Posted by sfenn1117 View Post
    Wasn't this site included in the entire waterfront rezoning for high density residential?
    No. This site and a few blocks around it were specifically left out of the rezoning to preserve industrial land there (at least, that was the stated reason). You can see a map of the changes on a .pdf document linked here:
    http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/gre...overview.shtml

  7. #37

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    Just noticed the response. A little after the fact but...

    No. Everywhere else, they'd implode this relic and start fresh. Only NYC goes for this nonsense.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Nobody is saying "fire up the furnace" ...

    The point is adaptive re-use of existing structures.

    It works pretty much everywhere.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeW View Post
    Just noticed the response. A little after the fact but...

    No. Everywhere else, they'd implode this relic and start fresh. Only NYC goes for this nonsense.
    I guess you consider the DUMBO neighborhood sheer "nonsense." I consider it one of the great new NYC neighborhoods.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeW View Post
    No. Everywhere else, they'd implode this relic and start fresh. Only NYC goes for this nonsense.
    That is not even close to being true.

  10. #40

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    No, it's pretty true. Anywhere else in the country, if there was a big block of valuable land being taken up by a derelict industrial facility, it would be plowed under and the land used to build exactly what was need (or at least the most profitable). We're one of the very few cities that insists on preserving our dinosaurs.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    That is not even close to being true.

  11. #41

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    Next time the Yankees go on the road and play the Orioles, make sure to watch the game.

  12. #42

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    I moved posts relating to the development of the Domino Sugar Plant to the Real Estate Forum, here:

    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=14450

    This thread can still serve for discussions about the existing Domino Sugar Plant although discussions about its future development and related preservation should be discussed in the new thread.

  13. #43
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    22 Historic Photos of Domino When It Was Still A Sugar Factory

    by Jessica Dailey






    With the unveiling of Two Trees' plans for the extreme makeover of Brooklyn's Domino Sugar Factory, a new era has begun for the industrial development, but less than a decade ago, the refinery was still churning out the sweet stuff. What New Yorkers know as Domino was created by Frederick Havemeyer in the mid-1800s; by 1887, the operation was renamed the American Refinery Company, and it was one of the world's largest sugar refineries. Here now, we bring you a look back at the factory's sugary past, with twenty-two historic photos of the refinery in action.

    The Domino Sugar Factory: a Relic of the Industrial Waterfront [East River History]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...ar_factory.php

  14. #44
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Domino Gets Approvals For Demo: Tear-Down Should Start Next Month

    By Erica Martin


    The landmarked refinery won’t be demolished. (Photo: Dima James’s Flickr)

    The Domino Sugar factory has been lying idly all summer on the Williamsburg waterfront, but its condominium future as high-rise apartments is now officially upon us, as part of the complex has been approved for demolition by the Department of Buildings. A rear building at 2 Grand Street was approved on July 29 and multiple attached buildings at 314 Kent Ave were approved a few days ago, on August 20.

    According to Dave Lombino, Director of Special Projects at Two Trees, the approvals are the first of many that will be necessary before the company can actually begin demolition, which he projects will take place sometime next month.

    Once they’ve received all permits, Two Trees will demolish the northernmost section of the factory, on Kent and Grand, and the large southern section that stretches from the Williamsburg Bridge to the landmarked refinery building, which Two Trees intends to restore, although its interior will be turned into office space.

    “We need to demolish some of the buildings now in order to be able to start work on the quarter-mile long waterfront bulkhead,” said Lombino. “The bulkhead is a significant piece of work that needs to happen before any parkland or buildings are constructed west of Kent Avenue many months down the road.”

    The first building to be constructed will not be on the waterfront, but on the site of the current Havemeyer Park, the pop-up bike trail, “urban farm,” and outdoor movie theater built by Two Trees on a vacant area of the factory grounds at the corner of Kent Ave and South 3rd Street. It will not be affected by this first burst of work, however, and its lease lasts until May of 2014, at which time Two Trees “may or may not” extend it, according to Lombino. Half the 660 units planned for this first high-rise will be affordable housing.


    Havemeyer Park. (Photo: Scott Lynch’s Flickr)

    Megan Sperry, who directed a documentary last year about gentrification in New York called The Domino Effect, and who regularly collaborates with opposition organization Save Domino, believes Two Trees is being “shady” by rushing into demolition. A post on her movie’s blog accuses Two Trees of ignoring the community by beginning demolition without first going through a Uniform Land Use Review Process (ULURP), the series of meetings with the community board and the city planning commission that must take place before the new plan is approved.

    “They want to pretend that they are ‘making progress’ so that the community will believe that they have lost the battle,” said Sperry. “I have had conversations with people in the community who believe that it’s a ‘done deal,’ which to me is very disheartening. It seems that the community has gotten used to losing to the developer.”

    Two Trees bought the Domino Factory from Community Preservation Corporation Resources (CPC) last year. CPC’s own plan for developing the site was much hated by the community, but the ULURP for rezoning that it held in 2010 nevertheless ended with an approval. In March of this year, Two Trees unveiled their radical redesign of CPC’s plan.

    Community organization NAG, which is no fan of gentrification and is currently fighting tooth and nail against the developments in Greenpoint, released a statement two days ago offering its reluctant support of Two Trees’s new version of a developed Domino, citing its increase in open space and affordable housing, as well as its promise to put local businesses in its retail space.

    According to Lombino, Two Trees will indeed be conducting a ULURP, and is putting together the first public review for the process this fall. They’ve started the demolition process before the ULURP because they already have the rezoning they need to do so, left over from the previous owner’s approved plan.

    “We’re confident it will move forward,” said Lombino, of the plan. “But we have always said that in the event our new plan does not gain approval, we will develop under the existing zoning. The abatement, demo and waterfront work is a prerequisite to developing either plan.”

    http://bedfordandbowery.com/2013/08/...rt-next-month/

  15. #45

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    Slop architects is bringing Bangkok to Brooklyn with their take on the Elephant Building. For more, refer to YIMBY:

    http://newyorkyimby.com/2014/01/new-...velopment.html

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