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Thread: Graffiti

  1. #1
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    Default Graffiti

    we need help !!
    we are arriving on 9 september to nyc from barcelona, spain, we want to do a graffitti in Ny, doesent matter the place
    we have two questions:
    where can we buy spray paints ?
    where can we garff ? better a legal wall, where they are ?
    someone can help us or come with us to graff togheter, we also speak spanish
    we have graffitis in barcelona and in warsaw too, we have some photos of them
    we will be very thakfull for your help !!
    Balboa & Ware

  2. #2
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    Default help!!

    The Lower East Side is one neighborhood that has really embraced "graffitti art". *Ifyou want to create something that will remain for a period oft ime and have a serious design, I suggest you find your way into the community gardens. *I think any number of them would offer you a substantial wall to create a well thought out design. *I'm assuming you're not looking to simply do an elaborate tag.

  3. #3
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    Default help!!

    thank you very much for your suggestion, but I'm sorry, i do not understand what does it means community garden... with who may I speak ? we try to do something elaborated and our dream is to do this in NY, please a bit more information...
    gracias

  4. #4
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    Default help!!

    There are community gardens in many areas around NYC. More so in poorer, or once poor, areas where the vacant lots are turned into gardens maintained by the community.

    http://www.greenguerillas.org/
    http://www.interactivist.net/gardens/

    There used to be a place to do graffiti - like a museum or center - in Queens called Phun Factory, but I couldn't find a website. *Might want to try there, too.

    It might be tougher than you think. *Graffiti is being cracked down on heavily in NYC right now. *Everyone is tired of it, really. *Good luck. *Welcome to NYC. *Enjoy your vacation. *Please, do more than just tag up!

  5. #5
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    Default help!!

    thank you very much billyblancoNYC !!

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  8. #8

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    March 10, 2004

    ABOUT NEW YORK

    Michelangelo Did Ceilings. He Does Walls.

    By DAN BARRY

    HE did that tire shop, that mattress place and that pizzeria. He did that auto parts store, that police-equipment store and that funeral home. He did it all: inside buildings, outside buildings and on the sides of so many subway cars slithering through the city.

    "I painted everywhere," he says, looking out upon the Bronx through a car's rain-spattered window. "Every five feet was a Tracy."

    As he points from the passenger seat to the corners he has claimed on the urban canvas, the man known as Tracy 168, or Wild Style - or, simply, Michael Tracy - riffs on his life as an artist from the streets, spicing his grumbling singsong of prayer and epithet with stories of fistfights, hardships and premature death.

    I jumped off that bridge one time when I was getting chased. {hellip} I lived there, and there, and there. ... I used to jump from the roof onto the fire escape to get into my apartment. I didn't have a key. I don't believe in keys. {hellip} Make a U-turn here. {hellip}

    If graffiti is the artistic equivalent of jazz, then Michael Tracy may very well be an Armstrong. He was among a small band of innovators in the late 1960's and early 1970's who began to adorn New York with bubble letters, cartoon characters and psychedelic images that hissed from spray-paint cans. Many of those stylists have cashed in, moved on or died off, but Tracy 168 is still out there: white-haired, spraying paint.

    At 46, he is a minor cult figure in demand, his work acquired by museums and commissioned by skateboard companies, fashion designers and magazines. But he also tries hard to maintain his credibility as a street kid who refuses to forget the Harlem and Bronx neighborhoods of his youth. The many jobs he has held do not just support his art, he says, they are part of his art.

    "I told this boss one time, 'You fire me, and I'll punch you in the face,' " he says. " 'You're terminated,' he tells me. 'O.K.,' I says. 'As long as you didn't fire me.'

    "Tracy humor."

    He writes notes to himself on the back of his left hand. He wears three wristwatches, with only one telling the correct time. The other two are set five minutes fast and two minutes fast, he says, "so that I'm ahead of death."

    He often ends his stories with "next," and sometimes plants false details - what he calls "giraffes" or "elephants" - into his tales to test the integrity of his listeners. He speaks with a dems-and-dose inflection that eases when he begins to discuss his work. It is then that he reveals the deepness of thought behind everything he paints; the whirring and blurring of influences that range from the Bible to Hanna-Barbera.

    As the car idles at the corner of Arthur Avenue and East Fordham Road, he points to another of his murals, one done years ago for an auto parts store - and, he says, to beautify the neighborhood. It shows Fred Flintstone, Wilma, Pebbles and the Rubbles, all in one Stone Age car. Car, auto parts store, got it.

    Actually, Mr. Tracy says, it is about family.

    "Family is important," he says. "It's a family picture. You've got the husband, the wife, the kid and the happy neighbors."

    As for that man-sized TRACY 168 he recently painted in Queens - visible from the No. 7 train - he says the meaning is simple: "I'm still here."

    HE does not paint blood or guns; there is no glorifying violence. His focus, he says, is in lifting the human spirit of the city, particularly in the wake of Sept. 11. On the metal grates of the Brother's police-equipment store on Webster Avenue, for example, he painted the World Trade Center towers, a police helicopter, a police car and a street sign shaped like a Celtic cross.

    After the 9/11 catastrophe, which occurred two years after the death of his mother, he lived out of his car for a while. The truth, he says. No giraffe.

    "This is what I learned," he says. "I live here. I live in the moment."

    Night has come to the Bronx in the rain. The car's headlights shine on a panoramic mural adorning the R. G. Ortiz Funeral Home on the Grand Concourse. It shows a heavenlike paradise of lush trees and water that seems an extension of Poe Park across the street.

    It reminds him of his mother, and maybe of the victims of 9/11, but not of his own mortality. His three watches are mere fashion accessories, Tracy 168 says, because he does not expect to die.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  9. #9

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    March 28, 2004

    'I Wanted My Name to Travel Everywhere'

    By BG183

    BG183, known more formally as Sotero Ortiz, painted graffiti on hundreds of subway cars in the 1980's. He stopped in 1986 and now works commercially.

    THE first time was like, "Yo, man, I'm crazy or something! I'm painting a train!'' It was a rush, doing something illegal. But then you're disappointed because you don't see your name on a moving train. You had to do a lot of damage before you saw your name.

    There were so many trains it took me almost two months before I saw my name, and I was painting 50 to 100 cars a day, painting BG, BG, BG, over and over again. I wanted my name to travel everywhere, for everyone to see it. So I painted, first in black. Then I filled the letters with colors. After a few months, people started asking me: "Are you BG? Man, you're doing a lot of destruction!'' I was proud. I got respect.

    We were painting together, calling ourselves the TATS Cru, for Top Artists Talents. From one end to the other, the train became one big graffiti. In the TATS Cru were Bio, Nicer, Cem2, Kenn, Mack, Brim, Raz and myself. We did so much damage, we were in the M.T.A.'s 10 most wanted.

    In the beginning we hit the trains that were close to the Bronx, the number trains. Then we discovered the ghost yard up in Manhattan where trains went for repair. All the trains were there, including the letter trains. We snuck in through the back and painted all day. A train might wait a week before it got repaired, so we had time. We could hit 200 trains a day. We took turns to look out for officials or other graffiti artists who might paint over us.

    Sometimes we ran because a repairman saw us; we'd hide for a while, then return. Or we fought with the other graffiti guys, stealing their paint and their sneakers. We had policemen yell, "Stop or I'll shoot,'' which makes you run even faster. We never got caught.

    At the ghost yard we explored new styles, and we also painted characters. I started to be called BG 183 because I had 183 different styles. We did a lot of exploring, like real artists. Graffiti is about how you take a B and change it so much it doesn't look like a B but it's still shaped like a B. Then it's the colors, and the control of the spray can. I was able not to drip, to fill the letters right, to mix colors so people would say, "Wow, that's incredible.''

    Now the TATS Cru does all legal work and we make a living. Today everybody uses graffiti style, from DKNY to Adidas to Versace. If not for the M.T.A. I'd probably be in jail or on drugs. Painting trains helped me find myself as a person, as an artist. I'm all about graffiti. It's my life.

    As told to Franklin Servan-Schreiber

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  10. #10

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    May 9, 2004

    NEW YORK OBSERVED

    Painting the Town Red, Blue, Pink

    By PETER EDIDIN

    WHEN Peter Sutherland, a young photographer and documentary filmmaker, decided to create a portrait series of New York's graffiti writers, he had first to find them.

    The people who, depending on your point of view, despoil or enhance the city's public spaces with felt-tip marker and spray paint, are of necessity a shy and mostly nocturnal species. Their activity is illegal and increasingly subject to arrest and prosecution by the city, which sees graffiti not only as vandalism but as creating the sort of disorderly environment that Mayor Bloomberg calls "an invitation for criminal behavior."

    Mr. Sutherland ultimately succeeded in finding and photographing more than 50 writers, most of them in disguise. The work has been collected in a new book called "Autograf: New York City's Graffiti Writers,'' published this month by powerHouse Books. Among his subjects are some of the most prominent members of this underground community - known by their graffiti names, or tags, like Stay High 149, Claw, Revs and UFO.

    A number of those portrayed in the book agreed to be interviewed about their peculiar calling. Here are excerpts from some of those conversations.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  11. #11

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    This article drove me so nuts I was prompted to write a letter to the City Section. (It was cut down a bit and published -- next to another that defended grafitti -- in the May 16th paper.)

    >>

    To Whom it May Concern at the City Section:

    May 9th's article on graffiti writers ("Painting the Town Red, Blue, Pink...") encourages a form of vandalism that is a scourge on NYC. According to the article's author, "The people who, depending on your point of view, despoil or enhance the city's public spaces" are "shy." Some of the "most prominent members" of this community are interviewed, along with their ugly handiwork.

    Would your newspaper be quick to publish interviews with these vandals if their destructive energies were loosed on the Times headquarters?

    Few New Yorkers think pens and spray paint enhance their neighborhoods. Graffiti is a filthy, destructive habit that takes the luster off this jewel of a city. Please do not publish articles that encourage it.

  12. #12

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    The Graffiti problem has been something that NYC has had to contend with now for 30 years. I donít think any other social problem aside than urban decay has affected and touched NYers more than this subject. Everyone has an opinion on it! Like it or not respect or despise itís here and will not go away! Like the MTA did 15 year ago you can curb it but cannot negate it like a weed in your lawn it will always put up if not maintained.

    It sure costs to counter attack this social problem right out of tax payers pocketís but the alternative to not doing it IS???.Subway cars from the 80ís!!!!

    Like the war on terrorism which is now a way of life, the principle behind this social movement is the same. Preventive maintenance but you cannot eradicate it!

  13. #13
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Grafitti is simply the youth trying to make their mark.

    Just like a dog or cat will leave their mark or scent on something, so will man. Bears do it, wolves, tigers, cats, dogs, almost ANY territorial pack or other animal does it in some way or another.

    When kids are in school, they doodle on the desks and lockers, they do it EVERYWHERE.

    Thing is, it seems to amplify in areas where kids do not have any other method of expression. In the suburbs, kids eventually find some other venue to express, or just plain be heard. In the city, these kids go nowhere.

    We have to find out more about WHY these kids keep going to find a way to stop it.

    As for some of the art, I think it is good in some areas, or on things like plain white box-cars. But the grafitti-names are rather narcissistic(sp) and don't add much of anything.

    It doubly irks me when some of these guys can't even respect someone that has done something more complicated than a name scrawl and decide to paint ocer it with their markings.

    I don't know......

  14. #14
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    This is a crime, plain and simple. Why is every piece of shit romanticized now. It's not expression, it's vandalism. Just think how you would like it if some punk spray painted your home. I actually felt bad when in Europe that my city is the "home" of this mess that has spread across the globe.

    Maybe if commisioned, it would be somewhat ok, as far as the ghetto-ization of america is increasingly ok, but 99% of this is disrespectful and disgusting. I can't stand to see it. Nothing can be nice with these little punks. Look at the friggin' BQE. It's no where near complete and it looks like a war zone. I would love to see these people punished for all the shit that they spray.

  15. #15
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    So maybe the wall murals should not be classified as the same thing as Grafitti?

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