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Thread: 60 Wall Street sold for half a billion dollars

  1. #16

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    It's cheesy. It belongs somewhere down South, like Dallas or Hotlanta.

  2. #17
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    I personally don't have any strong feelings (positive or negative) about 60 Wall.

    New York has had several architectural eras. My favorite - and I believe the most aesthetically worthy - was the "Late Classic" phase of the 1920s-40s:


    When Internationalism took over in the 1950s-1970s, a lot of ungainly buildings were put up, including the hideous Water Street Wall (One & Two New York Plaza, 55 Water, etc.), which shattered the graceful spires, natural facades and mountain-like composition of Downtown.


    However, the rise of the WTC with its incredible size, symmetry and power (although not attractive buildings on an individual basis) gave a new identity and energy to the skyline - easing the loss of classic New York. They were so dominating that they made all other buildings/styles in the vicinity irrelevant - the only place the eye would go would be to the Twin Towers (and occasionally to Woolworth).


    Then came Post-Modernism, of which 60 Wall is an example. The era included Pelli's World Financial Center, which went a long way to restoring the mountain dynamic of Lower Manhattan:




    With the dominance of the World Trade Center and the mishmash of International, Classic and Post-Modern buildings, I think 60 Wall was a fairly innocuous addition - not nearly as good as WFC but not doing any more damage to the aesthetics than had already been done by One New York Plaza, 55 Water and their ilk:


    After 9/11, without the anchoring mass of the WTC, I do feel like the Lower Manhattan skyline in its current form is awkward and unbalanced. 60 Wall doesn't help that problem. But with late-modern additions at the new WTC I think it will regain its dominance.


    In short, I think 60 Wall is decent, but far from a great work. I like that is not a giant black box (like US Steel), doesn't have a flat top and is fairly tall. It is strong and powerful, but it's also fat and doesn't acknowledge it neighbors very well. I find the columns at the top gimmicky and don't care for its color scheme.

    Where would you rank it among its post-modern peer group of:
    -WFC
    -Worldwide Plaza
    -AT&T Building
    -Lipstick Building
    -Carnegie Hall Tower
    Last edited by RandySavage; January 11th, 2010 at 10:03 PM.

  3. #18
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    Was it irony or tribute that the neo-classic building 60 Wall replaced also featured columns in its crown (National City Co. Building on far right of below):


  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider View Post
    Yes. It is the faux columns and then everything above them to the roof and below them to the ground.
    Really, the roof bothers you? With all of the flat boxes in the area it's the roof that bothers you? Alright, I guess.

    RandySavage pretty much wrote what was stuck inside my head.

  5. #20
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    It's a hog.

  6. #21

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    I too don't understand the hate for the building, but I will say that it looks like the go-go-Gekko '80s more than anything else in the city.
    Last edited by kz1000ps; January 14th, 2010 at 01:42 AM.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by kz1000ps View Post
    I too don't understand the hate for the building, but I will say that it looks like the go-go-Gekko '80s more than anything else in the city.
    Exclusive shot of the inside:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by HoveringCheesecake; January 14th, 2010 at 11:49 AM.

  8. #23
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    It is your typical 1980's post modernism.

    I also think that people generally don't like mansard roofs (or hints of one) for whatever reason on modern buildings. See the Elysian in Chicago and how it is bashed on SSP.

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Mansard roofs on a building this size tend to be a bit overpowering -- there's too many mechanicals hidden away inside and the mass up top looks heavy, rather than like a crown.

  10. #25
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    I performed a little digital magic to make 60 Wall (and 1CMP) disappear from this pic and show what this view might look like. Base photo by rfcgraphics.com:


  11. #26

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    If you didn't tell us, few of us would have noticed. The first thing I caught was the Visionaire wasn't built yet.

  12. #27
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    It's like a very fat aunt trying to squeeze between two kids on the sofa.

  13. #28
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    I think the architect had a villa in Tuscany. Sixty Wall Street looks like a column from the Siena duomo with a french mansard roof. Barf.


  14. #29

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    I guess it would be counterintuitive to illuminate the mansard roof after installing solar panels. Any way, kudos to Deutsche Bank -Citigroup take note:


    Michael Beck


    January 25, 2012
    Deutsche Bank completes roof-mounted solar project at Americas’ headquarters

    Deutsche Bank today announced the completion and operation of a 122.4 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system at its Americas’ headquarters in New York, located at 60 Wall Street. The roof-mounted array will reduce the Bank’s electricity consumption from the grid and will decrease carbon emissions by 100 metric tons per year.

    60 Wall, a 50 story, 745 foot tall skyscraper, is occupied solely by Deutsche Bank. The PV System, which is located on the inclined south and east portions of the roof is the largest solar PV array in Manhattan and is currently the highest elevated solar PV flat panel array in the world, topping off at 737 feet above the ground. The installation was designed by professional engineers and has been approved by local governmental authorities.


    Solar panels on roof at 60 Wall

    “We are firmly committed to being a leader in sustainability and innovation,” said Seth Waugh, CEO of Deutsche Bank Americas and Member of the Group Executive Committee.. “This project is one part of a comprehensive global program to reduce the Bank’s consumption of fossil fuels and shift to more renewable sources of energy. Our goal is to neutralize the Bank’s global CO2 emissions by 2013.”

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said, “New York City has the most ambitious sustainability plan in the world in part because we’re working with private sector partners to reduce our carbon emissions, rely on cleaner energy sources, and meet the goals of our long-term sustainability program, PlaNYC. Deutsche Bank’s landmark achievement builds upon our shared work to build a greener, greater New York.”



    The 60 Wall Street initiative is the third solar project in North America completed by Deutsche Bank, including the two-phase installation of a 1.267 megawatt solar PV system at its Piscataway, NJ, office. Deutsche Bank’s Piscataway solar electric system completed in 2011, has delivered a net-zero electric building. A fourth project of a 1.5 megawatt system is underway at Deutsche Bank’s Parsippany, NJ facility with planned completion later this year.

    Demonstrating its commitment to sustainability, Deutsche Bank has increased its use of clean electricity from seven percent to 65 percent globally over the last four years. In the US and Canada, 100% of its purchased electricity is generated from wind power. The Bank was recognized as a corporate pioneer and founder of the WindMade™ label, the first global consumer label that identifies products made with wind energy.




    Photos here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/deutsch...n/photostream/






    http://www.flickr.com/photos/deutschebank/

    Deutsche Bank New York - Solar PanelsDeutsche Bank has installed what is currently the largest solar photovoltaic system in Manhattan and the highest elevated solar photovoltaic flat panel system in the world on the roof of its Americas Headquarters at 60 Wall Street.

    You can read more about Deutsche Bank and Sustainability here: www.banking-on-green.com
    Read more about Deutsche Bank in the USA here: www.db.com/usa/

  15. #30

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    Great idea. Maybe they can do the same at Worldwide Plaza.

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