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Thread: Brooklyn waterfront development

  1. #16
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Definitely the prettiest power plant I've ever seen...

  2. #17
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Could be a WHOLE LOT worse. Not bad at all, actually. It does look nice like a "tower." *Plus, if it's clean(er) and we need the power and they offer some parkland, galleries, jobs, etc., what's that horrible?

  3. #18
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    The renderings show the Elmhurst gas tanks in the background.

  4. #19

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    I don't know. *Something about having a park next to a power plant doesn't feel right inside of me. *However, this is the type of urban planning and compromise that works for all sides. *Besides, I don't see any other meaningfult developements in the are except other industrial edifices.

  5. #20

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    May 13, 2003

    City Opposes Power Plant on Waterfront

    By THOMAS J. LUECK

    The Bloomberg administration said yesterday that it would oppose a plan to build a 1,100-megawatt power plant on the Brooklyn waterfront. The plant has been proposed on a scenic parcel in Williamsburg that many regard as one of the most promising tracts of undeveloped land in the city.

    "While the administration acknowledges the need to create new generating capacity within New York City to keep up with our demand for power, it is also our job to make sure that new facilities are in the right place," said Jennifer Falk, a spokeswoman for the mayor.

    She said City Hall favored housing and open space on the land rather than a power plant. She said that within weeks the administration would announce its own plan for a 1.6-mile stretch of Brooklyn waterfront that includes the site.

    The power plant was proposed by TransGas Energy, which contracted to buy the blighted eight-acre site of a fuel oil depot for the project and said it would also include art galleries and a sculpture park. The site is close to Williamsburg's gallery and restaurant district and has a sweeping view of Manhattan.

    Opposition by the city does not necessarily halt the project, since the state controls the location of new power plants. Adam Victor, the owner of TransGas, said yesterday that state regulators would conduct a 12-month review of its application, and that the city's position would be weighed against arguments in favor of the plant.

    The state regulators "should see this for what it is, another reminder that everybody wants power, but nobody wants plants."

    The plant envisioned by Mr. Victor would generate enough electricity to light one million homes, burn relatively clean natural gas and recycle its waste heat to make steam that would heat buildings in Manhattan. Ms. Falk said that TransGas Energy had provided an "innovative design" and that the city would "work proactively to identify alternative locations" for the plant.

    Mr. Victor responded last night by saying, "There is no other place it can be sited," in part because the Williamsburg parcel would provide access to Manhattan's steam pipes through a new tunnel to be built under the East River.

    David Yassky, a member of City Council whose district includes the site, said late yesterday that "the mayor has made a terrific decision to move forward with waterfront revitalization."

    "A power plant would destroy that chance," he said.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  6. #21
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    I pretty much agree that this is better as residential and park/leisure, but the city and state are awful at doing anything. *Lokk at friggin' Queens West! *Will this actually get done. *it should, but will it? *

  7. #22

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    June 19, 2003

    City Seeking to Rezone Brooklyn Waterfront

    By TARA BAHRAMPOUR

    City officials yesterday announced a rezoning plan that would open the crumbling East River sections of Williamsburg and Greenpoint in Brooklyn to housing and recreation.

    The plan is the first concrete step that the Bloomberg administration has taken since it announced last month that it would oppose a proposed 1,100-megawatt power plant on the Williamsburg waterfront. The city's plan calls instead for housing and open space on the 1.6-mile stretch of Brooklyn riverfront between the Williamsburg and Pulaski Bridges, and increased residential and commercial zoning in a 170-block swath inland.

    Community groups that had long opposed the power plant applauded the city's plan, which includes zoning for residential towers along the waterfront and provisions for low-income housing among market-rate apartments.

    "It's historic," said Adam Perlmutter, a lawyer for the Greenpoint-Williamsburg Waterfront Task Force, which opposed the plant. "It's an opportunity to put a waterfront out there worthy of Sydney, Seattle, and San Francisco."

    The area has been largely zoned for manufacturing for 42 years. In recent decades, as waterfront industries were replaced by residents and stores, the area took on a patchwork of uses.

    "We walked block by block, street by street, and it became clear that a standard rezoning was inappropriate," said Amanda M. Burden, the chairwoman of the City Planning Commission.

    The commission's 18-month study used community input to come up with a combination of residential, mixed use, and commercial zoning. The proposed zoning map is full of indentations where the zoning was fine-tuned to fit in with current use. The proposal includes low-to-middle-income housing, legalization of lofts, extensive public access to the waterfront, and a riverside esplanade with adjacent recreational space. In line with a request to protect existing industry, the plan preserves manufacturing in currently industrial areas like the Domino's Sugar factory. The most striking change would be the erection of 150- to 350-foot-high residential towers in a landscape that is nearly as flat as it was a century ago.

    Community groups and elected officials praised the plan yesterday. "They seem to be determined to make this a centerpiece of a very unique waterfront community," said Christopher Olechowski, the chairman of Community Board 1's rezoning task force.

    Supporters cited the plan's designation of a state park at an 8-acre riverfront site at North 12th Street where TransGas Energy has applied to the state to build a power plant. David Flanagan, a spokesman for the State Public Service Commission, said that it is very early in the state approvals process but that " zoning will be a key issue for the case."

    The park would be financed by the Olympics and used for beach volleyball and archery if the Games come to New York in 2012. A few blocks south, New York University plans to build playing fields, which would also be used for the Games. A spokeswoman for the City Planning Commission said that the plan calls for open space on the site, even without the Olympics.

    Daniel L. Doctoroff, deputy mayor for economic development and rebuilding, said that the area should remain recreational space. The TransGas application, he said, is not consistent with the city's proposal.

    Over years of industrial use, parts of Greenpoint and Williamsburg have suffered from environmental contamination. Adam Victor, the owner of TransGas, said it would cost at least $35 million to clean the North 12th Street site enough to use it as a park. But Mr. Doctoroff said there was no study to back that figure and added that cleanup would be paid for by corporations that had caused the contamination. The city also plans to offer up to $200 million to help developers clean up the sites.

    Last night the city presented the plan to a Community Board 1 zoning task force, and on Tuesday it will present it to the public. In coming months, the department will review the plan with Community Board 1, business, neighborhood and civic groups, and elected officials, with final approval required by the City Council.

    Some residents have fought new industrial plants and new residential towers. But Steve Hindy, owner of the Brooklyn Brewery on North 11th Street and a member of Community Board 1, said allowing towers was necessary. "There's a pretty large number of people in the community that are opposed to anything above five or six stories," he said. "But 30 years of saying no to housing proposals on the waterfront is what brought us the proposal for a garbage transfer station, which we were very lucky to defeat, and it's what brought us the proposal for the power plant, which we hope to defeat. So I hope people realize that they've got to say yes to something here."


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  8. #23

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    #Moderation Mode



    <a href="http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/topic.cgi?forum=3&topic=202" target="_self">Moved here</a>

  9. #24

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Hey, sorry if this has been mentioned, or if this is strictly a Greenpoint thread, but there's some waterfront developments going on South of Greenpoint too.

    In addition to the Brooklyn Bridge Park, which maybe expanding to 6 piers, before it's even started. Additionally, The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, also known as the Jehovah’s Witnesses, announced this week their interest *in selling their landmark printing facility at 360 furman st. on the Brooklyn Piers between Jorealemon st & Atlantic ave.

    “It’s a million square feet and it has absolutely spectacular views of the Harbor and Lower manhattan.

    It's a gorgeous 1928 factory building with enormous potentional for great loft/residential or commecial space.

    You can read more about it here:

    http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/i...23/26_23bp.pdf

    (I haven't posted here before, but I'm impressed with the relative civility of these boards compared with most of cyberspace.)

  10. #25

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Here's a few other links to this news, with some photos. The building is right between piers 5 & 6 and, surrounded by the future brooklyn Bridge park. Any residentional development will have astronomical prices, with the views of Wall st., the Verrazano bridge, statue of liberty and brooklyn bridge. Oy!

    http://www.watchtowerinformationservice.org/furman.htm

    http://www.jw-media.org/region/ameri...sa_e030529.htm

    http://www.nydailynews.com/business/...9p-85813c.html

  11. #26
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    I didn't even know it was owned by them.

    It would do well as a residential conversion, though I doubt too many people would enjoy looking out their windows and seeing the BQE.

  12. #27

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Better that large scale development is created on the Brooklyn shore than on the Jersey shore.

  13. #28

    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    What the city has in mind.

    Rendering by Morello Art & Design
    Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects

  14. #29
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    What is this from??

  15. #30
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    Default Brooklyn waterfront development

    Ah, W'burg and Greenpoint. *I wonder if this is their plan for Red Hook, too. *

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