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Thread: Downtown Flushing Development

  1. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by recognize
    what is the building going up in the distance on the right side of the photograph?
    That may be a condo. I'll check it out as soon as I can.

  2. #107

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    RKO Plaza Condominiums
    "With its stunning Spanish baroque interiors original designed by the renowned architect Thomas Lamb in 1927, the RKO Keith Theater development is poised to become a market-setting project for the Leviev Boymelgreen organization. Located at the nexus of Northern Boulevard and Main Street in the heart of Flushing Queens, the theater, originally one of the premier performing arts and motion picture houses in the borough of Queens, has fallen into disrepair and been closed to the public for almost 20 years. Purchased by the organization in 2002, the building will be strategically redeveloped into a 15-story, mixed-use condominium tower with prime retail space, a senior center, and a dramatic glazed facade designed to evoke the image the old auditorium space. The highlight of the project, however, will be the restoration of the beautifully detailed landmarked ticket lobby and grand foyer which will form the centerpiece of the ground floor retailers and residential lobby. The RKO project will offer 200 spacious residences designed by a class A architectural team comprised of V Studios and Meltzer Mandl. Amenities will include Feng Shui inspired interiors, a state of the art fitness center, and a 200 space parking garage with accessory parking for residents. The RKO project is scheduled for completion in early 2008..."

    http://www.levievboymelgreen.com

  3. #108

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    Here are some shots I produced of the rendering on the website. They were hard to get since there were no direct images, just a stupid flash environment. Enjoy!

  4. #109

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    For laughs, check out the comments posted on RKO Keith on CinemaTreasures, some theater website.

  5. #110

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    How can they list prices for real estate to be sold 2 years from now?
    Last edited by submachine; January 30th, 2006 at 10:49 AM.

  6. #111

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    Been following this thread with great deal of interest for last couple of years. My first posting here. Been living in Flushing for almost ten years.

    http://www.nysun.com/article/26452

    Mayor To Redevelop Iron Triangle in Bid To Transform Flushing

    By DAVID LOMBINO - Staff Reporter of the Sun
    January 25, 2006

    Just east of the parking lot at Shea Stadium lies the Iron Triangle, a 48-acre site zoned for heavy industrial use that is occupied by a ragtag mix of auto related businesses. The area, sealed off from the rest of Queens by highways, train tracks, and mounds of waste, is the site of the city's next redevelopment project, and one of its most ambitious to date.

    Next month, the Bloomberg administration will ask preselected developers to submit proposals to remake Willets Point, aiming for a mix of residential, commercial, retail, and entertainment use. The project is expected to cost billions of dollars and take years to complete.

    The aim of the redevelopment is to transform Flushing into a regional destination, take advantage of the area's extensive road and rail network, provide thousands of new jobs, increase tax revenues, improve the environmental quality of the neighborhood, and spur further growth of the Queens waterfront and downtown Flushing. The redevelopment would complement a new Shea Stadium planned for across the street.

    "The city's goal is to create an experience that is unique to the New York metropolitan region, with a strong sense of place and an attractive new identity," a spokeswoman for the city's development agency, Janel Patterson, said.
    As with some of the other large redevelopment projects in the works that also have the city's approval, such as the Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn and the new Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, members of the local community say City Hall's grand plans neglect neighborhood interests.
    About 80 businesses currently occupy the Iron Triangle, from garages to auto parts stores to a spice manufacturer. While plans for redevelopment of the area have been discussed for years, some neighborhood advocates say the threat of eminent domain is hanging in the air.
    The city has required that all proposals for Willets Point include a relocation plan for the existing businesses, and the city is currently working to finalize a comprehensive "Business Assistance and Workforce Development Program" to assist both businesses and workers affected by the project.

    But the area's City Council member, Hiram Monserrate, a Democrat who calls himself a defender of the "little guy," wants to ensure that those relocation and compensation packages are more generous than offers the city has recently made to owners and tenants ousted by other large-scale development projects.
    So far, Mr. Monserrate said, the city's outreach to the community has been insufficient.

    "The administration has a worldview that is pro-big business," he said. "Are they talking about building schools, affordable housing, maintaining some of the businesses there, relocation plans?"
    Mr. Monserrate said he has seen a proposal for Willets Point that envisioned a "supermall, even bigger."
    A professor of urban planning at Hunter College, Tom Angotti, will soon release a study he is writing with a team of graduate students on the existing businesses of Willets Point, their employees, as well as a land use analysis and potential development alternatives.

    "Once again, the city's process seems to be evading discussion with the local businesspeople and hanging the threat of eminent domain over them without involving them in the process," Mr. Angotti said.
    City officials said the planning process has been inclusive and that they have met with businesses and representatives of the community, as well as with the president of Queens, Helen Marshall, the state, and the appropriate city agencies.

    Mr. Angotti said redevelopment of Willets Point would displace a diverse, valuable local economy.
    "These are jobs that are available to people that don't have many other entry options into the job market," he said. "The impression is created that there is nobody there. That it's a junkyard. It's just not true."

    A spokesman for Ms. Marshall, Dan Andrews said the borough president "does not believe that all the companies, or at least the bigger companies, would relocate, would be absorbed into one of the existing proposals."
    Redeveloping the area will be no easy task. The city's request for developers' expressions of interest said that since the 1950s the area has had "severe infrastructure constraints, including lack of sanitary sewers," bad drainage, and unpaved sidewalks and streets.

    Redeveloping the area will be no easy task. The city's request for developers' expressions of interest said that since the 1950s the area has had "severe infrastructure constraints, including lack of sanitary sewers," bad drainage, and unpaved sidewalks and streets.

    In addition, there is strong potential for contaminated soil that would require remediation. The loose organic silt below would require more expensive pile-supported foundations.

    From a planning perspective, Mr. Angotti said Willets Point offers the advantage of easy access to highways, subways, and commuter rails, and the disadvantage of being isolated from other residential neighborhoods by a virtual moat of transportation infrastructure.

    A Queens developer, Lester Petracca, whose company Triangle Equities chose not to submit a project proposal, called it "a very, very large project" and "a great site."

    Mr. Petracca said any development would face potential challenges from traffic mitigation, the need to relocate the existing owners, and environmental remediation.

    The city is currently undertaking environmental, engineering, and soil studies, as well as infrastructure analyses. Next month, the city will ask 13 firms - the respondents to a request for expression of interest issued in November 2004 and due in March 2005 - for development proposals.

  7. #112
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    But the area's City Council member, Hiram Monserrate, a Democrat who calls himself a defender of the "little guy,"
    Little criminal guys is more like it. Amazing. They pollute the land and now they want to extort the city for all they can. They're lucky the city and some environmental agency aren't throwing them all in jail. Trying to paint themselves as the "poor little guys." These "poor" auto shop owners drive nice fancy luxury cars while ripping off their customers. What a joke.

  8. #113

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    Who cares about these businesses? They've done nothing but ruin the environment and make it virtually unsustainable for occupation. THEY should pay the city for reparations. I don't hold anything against Monserrate though. He, as well as other politicians look out in their constituents' interests.

  9. #114

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    After hearing Bloomberg's State of the City address, I heard Bloomberg referring to a "$500 million project" in Flushing. He was mostly likely referring to Flushing Commons. Nothing has happened at the site yet.

  10. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGator
    since the 1950s the area has had "severe infrastructure constraints, including lack of sanitary sewers," bad drainage, and unpaved sidewalks and streets.

    In addition, there is strong potential for contaminated soil that would require remediation. The loose organic silt below would require more expensive pile-supported foundations.
    The Flushing "River" at low-tide STINKS so bad you can smell it from the Whitestone Expressway / Van Wyck, and its been that way since I was a kid.

  11. #116
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    Exactly. And now we finally have an administration that cares enough and is willing to do something about it but these greedy chop shop owners are trying to keep this place remaining in the filthy, wretched state it is in now.

  12. #117

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    Revitalizing Willets Point is crucial as a whole in terms of Queens' development. With Flushing already on the fast track to improvement, Willets Point will need to serve as a bridge between Flushing and communities further west.

    Oh and as for progress on Queens Crossing, it seems the general shape of the building is complete. Fireproof cladding is already on some portions of the infrastructure.

  13. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby
    these chop shop owners are trying to keep this place

    I dont think they have a choice, the land would be bought for a fixed price under eminent domain laws, and rezoned from M3-1 to non-industrial. Also
    City officials, including Mr. Monserrate and Councilman John C. Liu, say many Iron Triangle businesses have long been operating illegally and constantly violate city regulations.
    Last edited by submachine; January 28th, 2006 at 03:06 PM.

  14. #119
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    Well that's good to hear.
    I just hate how everyone think it's all right to get as much as they can from the city. People think, "well, it's the city's money so I don't care." But the fact is the city's money is essentially our money--the city taxpayers' money--so they should care.

  15. #120

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    Flushing River's infamous stink may come to end before 2007 comes upon us...

    Tank answer to Flushing River sewage stench

    Queens Courier article

    BY VICTOR ROSS
    Thursday, January 26, 2006 4:50 PM CST

    The City Environmental Protection agency's [DEP] new 28-million gallon Flushing Bay sewage retention tank and a new area-wide combined sewer system will become operational this November, The Queens Courier has learned.

    The nine-year, $300 million project promises to not only end the pervasive summertime stench from the polluted Flushing River, but to also speed development of Downtown Flushing and the "Iron Triangle" business complexes.

    Councilman John Liu called the new project, “a tremendous boon towards restoring the Flushing River as the centerpiece of our community and revitalizing this important natural resource."

    The project is designed to improve water quality in Flushing Bay by vastly reducing the amount of sewage that overflows from the combined sewers into the Flushing River, which is the largest tributary to the bay.

    Built on the site of three former baseball fields beneath Kissena Park, at Fowler Ave., the reinforced-concrete tank is over 800 feet long, more than 500 feet wide, and 20 feet high. Sitting on the roof of the completed tank will be two Parks Department state-of-the-art soccer fields. Also scheduled is a $14 million renovated promenade along the Flushing River waterfront.
    A rising population and an inadequate combined sewer system with no significant storage capacity, Flushing's 15 ancient sewer lines routinely discharge millions of gallons of raw sewage and rain water into the smelly Flushing River during inclement weather.

    The river, EPA engineers say, cannot support aquatic life because it has a nearly zero oxygen rating.

    At a Community Board 7 hearing in 1993, EPA engineers predicted that the new tank and sewer line systems will raise this rating to an approximate four parts per million — sufficient to support sea life and eliminate much of the odor around the mile long, 200-foot-wide, river.

    After a heavy storm, the new retention tank will temporarily store the rain or melted snow and local sewage for 12 to 18 hours, until it can be pumped to the nearby Tallmans Island Sewage Treatment Plant.

    Congressmen Gary Ackerman and Joseph Crowley have already garnered an additional $15 million for dredging the Flushing River and Bay this coming spring to decrease odors that are common during low tide, and also reduce floatable trash in the bay.

    The huge tank promises to cut the combined sewage overflow into the river by 90 percent.

    Designed to contain the sewage odors within the huge tank, the DEP has stressed the giant unit's two ongoing programs:

    *The odor from the stored sewage will be captured, treated and deodorized by a dual control system which "scrubs" the air and then treats it via a carbon absorption system.

    *During excessively rainy weather, the sewage tank overflow will be disinfected to diminish toxic waste discharge into the river.

    The project began construction in July, 1997, and is one of three major combined sewer overflow abatement projects, that include Alley Pond Park in Douglaston and one in Brooklyn.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    What irks me is that it took nearly a decade to get this thing built. I suppose it doesn't matter at this point. This very well spells the end of that awful stink and will help speed up development in Flushing.

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