Page 9 of 32 FirstFirst ... 567891011121319 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 135 of 469

Thread: Downtown Flushing Development

  1. #121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vlissengen
    At a Community Board 7 hearing in 1993, EPA engineers predicted that the new tank and sewer line systems will raise this rating to an approximate four parts per million — sufficient to support sea life and eliminate much of the odor around the mile long, 200-foot-wide, river.
    14 years later

  2. #122

    Default

    http://www.nylcv.org/Programs/WPC/bl...hing/index.htm


    Flushing is one of the City’s fastest-growing commercial districts and home to a thriving Asian community. Property values have increased, as the area has blossomed into an attractive retail zone. Despite this surge in economic activity and investment, Flushing’s waterfront has been left behind and still bears the scars of past industrial and municipal uses. The Flushing River and its waterfront, through a patchwork of public and private lands, provide opportunities for establishing new connections to link Flushing residents to the East River waterfront and Flushing Meadows/Corona Park.
    Downtown Flushing includes 47 acres of waterfront along the eastern shore of the Flushing River, from 35th Avenue to 40th Road, and extending east to College Point Boulevard. Most of the Flushing waterfront was rezoned in 1998 from manufacturing to commercial plus residential and community facility uses, to focus new development in former manufacturing zones and revitalize the waterfront. In conjunction with the 1998 rezoning, a Waterfront Access Plan (WAP) was adopted which requires that new development along the Flushing River provide a waterfront esplanade, upland connections to the esplanade, and visual corridors in locations specified by the plan. Thus, the several mixed-use projects already planned for the waterfront will simultaneously provide the backbone of this open space system. Eventually, as this esplanade is built out and the City undertakes several capital improvement projects, a system of waterfront access loops can be established along the Flushing waterfront to run from the World’s Fair Promenade on the Flushing Bay all the way into Flushing Meadows-Corona Park to the south.
    The first step towards realizing a revitalized waterfront must be to address environmental quality. Major projects are already planned or being implemented include a Combined-Sewer Overflow Tank near the southern end of the Flushing River. Planned for full operation in 2005, this facility will eliminate nearly all of the sewage that is discharged into the River during instances of heavy rainfall. The US Army Corps of Engineers is currently conducting a flow study of the Flushing Bay watershed, which includes the Flushing River and the larger Flushing Bay area. Also, the New York State Department of Transportation is engaged in a project to reconstruct the Whitestone Expressway bridge across the Flushing River. This area will become the natural western edge for a revitalized waterfront.
    The central piece of the vision for the waterfront is a new open space system that will allow the public to enjoy the River as a destination for recreation and relaxation.
    1. Downtown Flushing Roosevelt Avenue Waterfront Access Project: This project is for construction of a portion of the shore public walkway and a sitting area on the only owned City-owned site located within the Downtown Flushing Waterfront Access Plan. The project consists of improving the deteriorated sidewalk adjoining the Roosevelt Avenue bridge and constructing a 40-foot wide walkway segment along the river. Other improvements could include a bicycle rack, signage, and improved lighting throughout the area.
    2. Esplanade Connection To Flushing Meadow Corona Park: This area is located east of the elevated Van Wyck Expressway and north of the Long Island Rail Road viaduct. The project would seek to collaborate parcels owned by the New York State Department of Transportation and some parts owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. There would be a walkway and a connection into the park over the LIRR viaduct or Flushing River.

    Wetlands Along The Flushing River
    A critical piece of the waterfront’s future is the site just south of Northern Boulevard, which is currently occupied by a concrete plant and an adjacent City-owned parcel used for surface parking. A park on this site would be an important addition to the area’s open space, and would anchor the waterfront esplanade at its northern end.
    Looking ahead, the waterfront will be a nexus of activity in Downtown Flushing and serve as a connection to Willets Point across the river. Several longer-term initiatives will improve mobility to and through the area and connect the zoning mandated Flushing River waterfront esplanade to the Flushing Bay Promenade, Willets Point, and Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. This pedestrian loop system would provide unique waterfront access opportunities because it would traverse through recreational, industrial, natural and redeveloping portions of the waterfront.
    1. In order to develop the loop system of waterfront access, a pedestrian bridge crossing the Flushing River would help to create a link between Downtown Flushing and redevelopment on Willets Point, as well as the existing Flushing Bay Promenade, north of Shea Stadium. A bridge would also help the public access the natural edge of the river, which is dominated by wetlands and relatively low elevated highways and ramps. An elevated boardwalk, which would protect the natural resources of the wetlands areas, would be possible as a link to the pedestrian bridge on the western side of the river, and would serve as the access point for pedestrians and bicyclist to reach the Promenade.
    2. Ferry service could be explored and could be incorporated into plans for the waterfront park as they proceed.
    3. A new entrance to the #7 subway station on Prince Street would bring transit riders closer to the waterfront and serve residents of the new housing developments there. Also, the redesign of College Point Boulevard would make it more pedestrian friendly, eliminating a barrier to pedestrians walking between the downtown core and the waterfront.
    Top of page

  3. #123

    Default

    City wants proposals for 'Triangle'

    Link to article.

    BY DONALD BERTRAND
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    The future of the "Iron Triangle," a gritty 48-acre cluster of junkyards in Willets Point just east of Shea Stadium, brightened a bit last week.

    New York City's Economic Development Corp. issued a Targeted Request for Proposals for the redevelopment of Willets Point.

    The 12-block Iron Triangle is the largest single stretch of garages and junkyards in the city, with more than 80 auto repair shops and salvage yards among its businesses.

    "This targeted [area] is another step forward in our efforts to transform the underused, underserved Iron Triangle into a new regional destination with a vibrant mix of uses to enhance the area's assets, such as the communities of Flushing and Corona and the Flushing Bay waterfront," said EDC President Andrew Alper.

    The request for proposals is being sent to a group of developers who were selected from 13 proposals received in response to a Request for Expressions of Interest issued in November 2004.

    The development corporation would not say how many of the 13 were still in the running.

    The responses are due May 5.

    Alper said the goal of the proposal request is to select a development partner or partners to implement what EDC calls "a viable strategic redevelopment plan to be outlined in the upcoming environmental review and public review processes."

    "The high quality and enthusiasm of the responses we received to the [2004 request] clearly demonstrate the confidence of the development community in the potential of a new Willets Point," Alper said.

    Last summer the development corporation designated a developer to build a $500 million project that will create a new town square in downtown Flushing, along with 500 residential units, 350,000 square feet of retail space, a hotel and a community center on the site of what is now a municipal parking lot.

    The selection of the Willets Point developer will be made after the public review process, said EDC spokeswoman Janel Patterson.

    Over the past year, the development group has conducted environmental, engineering and soil studies, along with infrastructure analysis and site surveys of the area.

    In the next few months, it will select a consultant to prepare an environmental impact statement and begin the public review process for the redevelopment effort.

    In addition, a business assistance and workforce development program is being finalized to assist businesses and workers that may be affected by the redevelopment.

    "This marks a milestone in a decade-long effort to transform this part of Queens into a centerpiece of opportunity and renewal for the entire city," said Councilman John Liu (D-Flushing).

    "It's fairly exciting, and the EDC deserves credit for moving it along. This ties in well with the planned new Mets stadium."


    Originally published on February 13, 2006[/b]

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This is good news - it certainly means Willets Point is closer to redevelopment. The article also mentions the planned Flushing Commons on the Parking Lot 1, though no construction dates are mentioned.

  4. #124

    Default

    The website for Queens Crossing has been updated, although I don't like their use of Flash. The navigation reloads every time you go to another page! They do provide some new information, like this piece from their "Travel page":

    Retailers around Queens Crossing is the new Queens Center, Macy’s, JCPenney, Coach, Banana Republic, Armani Exchange, Aldo, Club Monaco, Bath & Body Works, Kay Jewelers and more.

    Those retailers are nowhere near Flushing, except for Macy's. Unless those are the tenents...

  5. #125

    Default

    Here's a scan of the Flushing Commons project from a local paper (TimesLedger) - it provides a good view of the park and adjacent walkways:


  6. #126
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    So what's the status with FC? Is it still a go?

  7. #127

    Default

    I hope so. I recall they have to do environmental and community reviews. Hopefully those will go well.

  8. #128

  9. #129

    Default

    Progress is being made at both the Queens Crossing and Flushing Metro Center sites. For the former, they are already placing the exterior panels on the structure itself. Unfortunately, it's nowhere near Manhattan-quality and is the same-old architecture that seems to be used all around here.

    As for the latter, all of the old warehouses have long been bulldozed and the land is being expanded via infill and metal plates that will hold the water back. I'd imagine we'll see some actual buildings in the coming months.

  10. #130

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Strattonport
    Progress is being made at both the Queens Crossing and Flushing Metro Center sites. For the former, they are already placing the exterior panels on the structure itself. Unfortunately, it's nowhere near Manhattan-quality and is the same-old architecture that seems to be used all around here.
    I thought it was "Flushing Town Center", but yeah its a bunch of bulldozers and broken up foundations.

    Queens Crossing is looking odd, 5 stories higher than surrounding buildings...

  11. #131
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Here's Flushing Commons once again:

  12. #132
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Flushing Metro Center
    Flushing, NY

    Perkins Eastman provided site planning review and conceptual design services for this 14-acre, 3.2M sf mixed-use complex near the heart of downtown Flushing, Queens. Developed by Muss Development Company, the project uniquely mixes residential units with a four-story, big-box retail base. The entire complex includes 950 residential apartments, more than 725,000 sf of retail space, and parking for 2,650 vehicles. The residential units will be a mixture of mixture of one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments, augmenting the housing options for a growing neighborhood that includes many businesses and cultural attractions, and offers proximity to major airports and highways, as well as convenient subway and LIRR access. With trains running on both sides and low-flying aircraft limiting the height of the residential towers to ten stories, the site constraints of the project are particularly challenging. The project will also include a small community center as well as the public promenade along Flushing Bay, the first phase of a larger waterfront master plan. The entire project will be constructed in three phases over a ten-year period.


  13. #133

    Thumbs up Flushing Commons

    The Flushing Commons site is still going forward. The public commenting meeting occurred this evening at the Queens Library. If anyone still wishes to make comments about the scope of environmental analysis being performed they may do so in writing by following the information provided at the following website.

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/oec/html/home/home.shtml

    Construction would not begin on this project for at least another 12 months, probably closer to two years from now. It's not slated to be opened until 2010 or later.

    The MUSS development has cleared the site and I believe is awaiting the final city approvals on the design. I saw a big empty site this evening while passing by on the train.

    Willet's Point submittals were due last week. If the process is anything similar to the selection process for Flushing Commons, it could be almost two years before a development team is selected.







  14. #134

    Default

    If I knew that meeting was today, I would've went.

    In any case, the .PDF files provided on that page give plenty of information on the project. Worth a look.

  15. #135
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    2010?
    Or later?!!

    Isn't that when the Freedom Tower, the Calatrava PATH station, the Fulton Street station, the new Mets and Yankee stadiums, not to mention a host of other much bigger projects are suppose to be completed?

Page 9 of 32 FirstFirst ... 567891011121319 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 02:30 AM
  2. Study Calls for Adding Ferries to Link Suburbs to Downtown
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: March 11th, 2008, 04:47 AM
  3. 'The Downtown Bronx'?
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: November 14th, 2005, 06:30 PM
  4. Future of Flushing Airport Site
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 13th, 2004, 09:15 PM
  5. Memorials Proliferate in Crowded Downtown
    By Fabb in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 16th, 2004, 07:44 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software