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Thread: Woolworth Building - 233 Broadway - by Cass Gilbert

  1. #91
    The Dude Abides
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    Thanks for those photos, Darryl. That second one is a view I don't think I've ever seen, and it reminded me of another famous terra cotta-clad skyscraper...



    The Smith Tower of Seattle - built in 1914 (one year after the Woolworth), it was the 6th tallest building in the world at the time (3rd tallest outside Manhattan). 462 feet, still lookin' good today:


  2. #92

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    The Great Dame, in full glory, here, and here.

  3. #93
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    there are for-rent signs up now in the former chase ground floor space. according to the signs there is an olympic size pool in the basement. interesting.

  4. #94

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    "they produce GFRC Terra Cotta replacement elements "

    There's no such thing as glass fiber reinforced concrete Terra Cotta! call it GFRC, plastic or whatever, it's still just poured or sprayed molded concrete, and it's no substitute for an honest historic restoration in my opinion, it's a fake, pseudo, paper thin look-alike that smacks of cheapness compared to the original hand-made Terra Cotta.

    Much of the problems can be traced right back to POOR MAINTENANCE, and unless that changes, no matter what replaces what, it will not hold up either.

    Sculpting models to re-create traditional elements is not difficult, I do it every week as a self-taught sculptor most of my models are done in an average of 20-25 hours.
    Some samples of my architectural sculpted clay models all done from photos;

    Keystone, after keystones on 208 Eldridge St (demolished 1977)


    Public School 168, after dormer gargoyles


    Public School 168, after dormer gargoyles


    Spandrel panel after one at the Brooklyn museum's sculpture garden


    Art Deco after a frieze on a Chicago theater


    Keystone after keystones on 202 Eldridge st (demolished 1977)


    Work in progress, keystone, after keystones on 621 East 5th st (standing)
    Last edited by UrbanSculptures; February 29th, 2008 at 09:45 PM.

  5. #95
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    not lit up tonight. anyone know why?

  6. #96

  7. #97
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    12 Barfclay had its crown lit up pink last night.

  8. #98
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    yup, it started up a few weeks back and seems to be lit every night now - much to my glee. other than that 1 (maybe 2) night a few days back woolyb seems to be lit per the norm. hopefully the gehry and stern buidlings will have lit crowns as well.

  9. #99
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    I didn't know they put up plaques here. I gotta check it out the next time I pass by.

    Kinda like NY's own little version of Grauman's Chinese theater. I like it.

    Super Bowl-Winning Giants Get Canyon of Heroes Honor



    By FERNANDA SANTOS
    Published: June 11, 2008

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined the defensive end Justin Tuck of the New York Giants in Lower Manhattan on Tuesday morning to unveil a sidewalk plaque commemorating the Giants’ historic win over the heavily favored New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLII.

    “Like Lower Manhattan, the New York Giants know what it is to be underestimated, even written off,” Mayor Bloomberg said during the ceremony, which unfolded under scorching heat outside the Woolworth Building on Broadway, where the plaque was set. The plaque is one of the more than 200 granite strips in a route known as the Canyon of Heroes, marking those who have been honored by the city with ticker-tape parades.

    Mr. Tuck, who wore a beige four-button suit but no Super Bowl ring, thanked the fans and his family for their support and said, “It’s just a special moment not only to bring this trophy back to New York City and the tristate area, but in doing so beating a Boston team.”

    Mr. Bloomberg, who was born and grew up in Massachusetts, said after the ceremony — and after Mr. Tuck had left — that he was not a Patriots fan because “the Patriots didn’t exist” when he lived in Massachusetts. (The franchise, then known as the Boston Patriots, began as an American Football League team in 1960, right around the time Mr. Bloomberg left for college in Maryland.)

    He also said that he did not root for the Giants or the New York Jets when he was younger and was, in fact, a Colts fan.

    “I hate to admit this, but when I was in college, I was a rabid Colts fan because I went to school in Baltimore,” said Mr. Bloomberg, who graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1964, when the Colts, now in Indiana, still played in Baltimore.

    When it comes to basketball, the mayor said he roots for the Boston Celtics. But when it comes to baseball, his allegiances remain a mystery.

    Mr. Bloomberg would disclose only that he was not a fan of the Boston Red Sox — and, this being New York, the statement was perhaps his saving grace.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  10. #100
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The plaques are inset into the sidewalk along Broadway commemorating those who have had a ticker tape parade in their honor -- the plaques are chronological, with the earliest starting near Bowling Green and then moving north (on the west side of the street) ...

    Heady Days, Immortalized Where the Ticker Tape Fell


    Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times
    Jorge Condez, left, and Paul Corrales
    setting a plaque commemorating 1986
    ticker-tape honors for the Mets,
    on Broadway near Vesey Street.

    NY TIMES
    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    September 30, 2008

    BLOCKS

    In the midst of the longest ticker-tape drought in a quarter century, lower Broadway - the Canyon of Heroes - has been paved instead with 164 granite plaques from Bowling Green to the Woolworth Building.

    They commemorate ticker-tape parades from October 1886, when the Statue of Liberty was dedicated, to October 2000, when the Yankees last won the World Series. They were commissioned before 9/11 under a plan by the Alliance for Downtown New York to improve the streetscape with new sidewalks, lampposts, signs and wastebaskets.

    Only in recent weeks has the parade chronology been finished from beginning to end. Thirty-six intermediate plaques will be installed as permitted by construction projects along the route.

    Against the shadow of Sept. 11, 2001, these plaques recall a carefree, exuberant, giddy spirit that may be difficult to conjure again downtown, even if the Yankees do their part.

    Carefree? How about the parade in May 1962 when President Félix Houphouët-Boigny of the Ivory Coast was cheered as "Scott Carpenter" by spectators who mistakenly assumed he was a newly returned astronaut.

    Exuberant? How about the 1,900 tons of paper showered on Douglas (Wrong Way) Corrigan in August 1938 after his flight from New York to Ireland "instead of his 'intended' destination of California," as the plaque says, with quotation marks that constitute one of the few instances of editorializing.

    Giddy? How about May 1950, when there was a parade every day for three days, beginning with one for Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan of Pakistan. He was assassinated a year later, one of many foreign leaders who were hailed in the Canyon of Heroes and then jailed, deposed or murdered back home.

    "It was almost like a death sentence to get a ticker-tape parade," said Kenneth R. Cobb, the director of the municipal archives, who has compiled a parade history.

    After several spontaneous outbursts, one of the first organized uses of paper tape from stock-market tickers occurred Nov. 18, 1919, in a parade for the Prince of Wales, later the Duke of Windsor.

    Grover A. Whalen, the city's official greeter, recalled in his 1955 autobiography, "Mr. New York," that he arranged a word-of-mouth campaign among downtown businesses to give the prince a spectacular reception with streams of ticker tape. It wound up including torn-up phone books. (Hmmm. A city official, proud of his Irish descent, contriving to welcome the Prince of Wales by inundating him with waste paper thrown out of windows in tall buildings.)

    Watching the paper fall on the Yankees in 1996, Carl Weisbrod, the president of the Downtown Alliance, and Suzanne O'Keefe, the vice president for design, agreed that something should be done to commemorate the parades.

    As part of the $20 million streetscape project, under the direction of Cooper, Robertson & Partners, the design studio Pentagram came up with the idea of simple granite sidewalk strips - not unlike the ticker-tape ribbons that remain after a parade, said Michael Bierut, a Pentagram partner - with the date and a few words of description.

    (An illustrated brochure and map with information about all 200 parades can be picked up at kiosks outside City Hall and the World Trade Center PATH station or through the alliance, at downtownny.com or 212-835-2789.)

    The plaques were made by Dale Travis Associates, the firm responsible for the silver-leaf lettering in the Freedom Tower cornerstone. The granite blocks, 8 inches wide and 3 inches deep, were cut with a water jet, Dale L. Travis said. Then the two-inch stainless-steel letters were inserted, held by pins and thermoplastic grout.

    Last week, Jorge Condez and Paul Corrales of A.F.C. Enterprises set some of the last plaques, including "October 28, 1986 * New York Mets, World Series Champions," into place near Vesey Street.

    THREE years and 11 months have passed since the last parade, the longest interval since the 1978 Yankees broke a nine-year dry spell in the Canyon of Heroes.

    The next parade will not be easy. The image of a paper blizzard suspended in midair among the downtown skyscrapers, once a visual metaphor for civic celebration, was transformed on Sept. 11, 2001, into a metaphor for cataclysm.

    Is it still? Mr. Bierut hopes not. "Part of the resiliency of the city is retaining its own meaning for those metaphors and not surrendering them," he said. "The post-terror condition has acclimated people to view any disruption of routine as a cause for alarm. There will come a time when the disruption of the routine of city life is seen as something wonderful."

    "Ticker-tape parades were the very essence of that," Mr. Bierut said.

    Just in case, Ms. O'Keefe said, there are 33 blank spots available on Broadway and Park Row to mark future parades. At the current pace, she figured, that ought to last a century and a half.

    Copyright 2004The New York Times

  11. #101

    Default A New History for an Old Skyscraper


    The Woolworth Building, known for its height when it opened in 1913, is being extensively renovated. (Photo: Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times)


    A new book about the Woolworth building HERE

  12. #102

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    September 9, 2008, 4:31 pm

    Scraping a Very Low Sky

    By David W. Dunlap


    The Gothic pinnacle of the Woolworth Building, right, appeared to be scraping the sky on Monday. (Photo: David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)

    Neither critics nor clerics could restrain themselves when the Woolworth Building was completed in 1913 as the tallest in the world. Montgomery Schuyler, the leading architectural writer of his day, said the building “cleaves the empyrean.” (He might more easily have said it splits the sky.) The Rev. S. Parkes Cadman called it the Cathedral of Commerce and described it as “piercing space like a battlement in the paradise of God.”

    Ninety-five years later, it is tougher to look at the 161st tallest building in the world and see it in quite so romantic a light.

    But the approach of Tuesday’s storm gave that 792-foot Gothic pinnacle an empyrean worth cleaving. And it more than rose to the challenge.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...-very-low-sky/

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  13. #103
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    If it was possible to hump a building, Ms. WoolyB would be my humpee. I love thee WoolyB.

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  15. #105
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    nice pics. It was lit up all pink for Saturday's Breast Cancer Walk.

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